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Fw: [OATHSociety] Re: Savantism, Hacker Culture, and Calendrical Calculation

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  • Nathan Fields (Nth BarFields)
    Not sure if anyone on this list can answer this fellow s questions below. If so, you can email him at eyeless.shiver _at_ gmail.com
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 3, 2011
      Not sure if anyone on this list can answer this fellow's questions below. If
      so, you can email him at eyeless.shiver _at_ gmail.com

      =========================================================
      I have a few questions for you all about matters along the lines of the subject.
      I recently happened upon John Conway's famous Doomsday Algorithm; a precise and
      efficient way to calculate the day of the week for any given date. Growing up,
      I had always heard of so-called idiot or autistic savants who had such mental
      abilities, maybe at the cost of high sensitivity and social incapability. A
      month or two ago, I took it upon myself to look at how such techniques are
      performed. Apparently John H. Conway's algorithm yields perhaps the fastest
      results. Conway himself, for anyone unfamiliar with him, is professor of math
      at Princeton, and one of the original minds responsible for the so-called
      hacking movement, which is not malicious at all, as mainstream media might have
      led us to believe, but instead concerned with free access to information and
      free thought. As it turns out, the mathematical steps required for the esoteric
      savant calculation skill are relatively simple. I was able to learn how to
      calculate with some efficiency after an hour of looking online (wikipedia, more
      specifically). Conway, also according to wikipedia, is able to calculate the
      day of the week using his algorithm in two seconds. This next part is where
      maybe someone in this society can help me. John practiced with a simple program
      that quizzed him on the day of the week from his computer. Presumably, like
      with anything, he went from relatively slow and clunky calculations to slick and
      perfect ones. I'm interested in doing the same thing, and am wondering if
      anyone on here knows of such a simple program that would fit this task.
      Additionally, I'd like to raise the question about savantism in general. Is it
      useful? Are fast counting methods and mental abilities of any real use? Should
      such information be free for everyone, per the hackers' original intentions?
      Should children be taught to calculate in such manners from a young age in
      schools?

      All the best to you all,

      James
      ===================================================


      Nathan Fields (Nth BarFields)
      www.mentathlete.blogspot.com
      www.facebook.com/nth.barfields


      "Some critics think the Internet is making us dumb. The Internet fundamentally
      changes the opportunity set. All the world’s knowledge and all the world’s
      garbage are both just one search away. The Internet appears to exacerbate innate
      tendencies — the smart get smarter while others will simply find new ways to
      waste time or inflict harm.(Tom Vander Ark)"




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • JF
      Hey James/Nathan, ... http://www.memoriad.com/memoriadsoftware.asp ... Date calculations have their roots in the days when mental calculators used to perform
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 4, 2011
        Hey James/Nathan,
        >The memoriad software has a random date generator on it:
        http://www.memoriad.com/memoriadsoftware.asp
        >George's Pegasus files create random dates as well (go on the files section of the group).
        >Random.org is another good customisable source of dates: http://www.random.org/calendar-dates/

        Date calculations have their roots in the days when mental calculators used to perform for people. Nowadays its a mental drag race and a useful way to learn about the concept of modular division. Other than that it's a party trick.

        Human computation skills need only be taught so far (the most the system asks is that in theory a person should be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide anything with just a pencil and some paper and honestly what more do they need?).

        There's no empirical evidence drills such as these help in academic performance but that's probably because experiments centralise around what is essentially recall (addition of single digit numbers very quickly) rather than understanding the logic behind it.

        -My philosophy: Want results? Get people to enjoy it.

        -Josh
      • Jerry
        FWIW, I developed this algorithm after watching Rain Man back in 1989..... Example Date... 7/4/1976 Start by noting the month number, 7 for July. For each
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 7, 2011
          FWIW, I developed this algorithm after watching "Rain Man" back in 1989.....

          Example Date... 7/4/1976

          Start by noting the month number, 7 for July. For each month, I remember a specific number...

          January, October 0
          February, March, November 3
          April, July 6
          May 1
          June 4
          August 2
          September, December 5

          Now, add the six for July to four, the day of the month in question. To ten, add 5/4 times the last two digits of the year. Ignore any fractional part of the answer.

          10 + 76*5/4 = 10 + 95 = 105

          Last, divide the final total by seven.

          If remainder is 0, date was a sunday. If one, a monday etc.

          So the Bicentennial of the USA took place on a Sunday.

          Exception to rule: If month is January or February of a year divisible by four, subtract one from the total.

          This method is good for the 1900 years or years any multiple of 400 years more or less than the 1900 range.

          For the 2000 years ( 2400s or 1600s etc ) move the result back one day.

          For the 2100 years ( 2500s or 1700s etc) etc move the result ahead four days

          For the 2200 years ( 2600s or 1800s etc) move the result ahead two days.

          If given dates in the same century, I can usually do this in a couple of seconds. Changing centuries is like shifting gears.

          Jerry Newport



          --- In MentalCalculation@yahoogroups.com, "JF" <jsh.flynn@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey James/Nathan,
          > >The memoriad software has a random date generator on it:
          > http://www.memoriad.com/memoriadsoftware.asp
          > >George's Pegasus files create random dates as well (go on the files section of the group).
          > >Random.org is another good customisable source of dates: http://www.random.org/calendar-dates/
          >
          > Date calculations have their roots in the days when mental calculators used to perform for people. Nowadays its a mental drag race and a useful way to learn about the concept of modular division. Other than that it's a party trick.
          >
          > Human computation skills need only be taught so far (the most the system asks is that in theory a person should be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide anything with just a pencil and some paper and honestly what more do they need?).
          >
          > There's no empirical evidence drills such as these help in academic performance but that's probably because experiments centralise around what is essentially recall (addition of single digit numbers very quickly) rather than understanding the logic behind it.
          >
          > -My philosophy: Want results? Get people to enjoy it.
          >
          > -Josh
          >
        • Yusnier Viera
          Hi to everybody, Jerry, in my case I prefer to use *January, October 5 February, March, November 1 April, July 4 May 6 June 2 August 0 September, December 3*
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 7, 2011
            Hi to everybody,

            Jerry, in my case I prefer to use

            *January, October 5
            February, March, November 1
            April, July 4
            May 6
            June 2
            August 0
            September, December 3*

            The only difference is that is good for the 2000 years or years any multiple
            of 400 years more or less than the 2000 range. An excellent algorithm for
            17th and 21st century it's good for mental calculator competitors since in
            the contest we have dates in the range between 1600 and 2100 and my
            algorithm is good for two out of the five centuries (1600 years and 2000
            years) which is an advantage.

            For the 1900 years ( 2400s or 1600s etc ) move the result ahead one day.

            For the 1800 years ( 2500s or 1700s etc) etc move the result ahead three
            days

            For the 1700 years ( 2600s or 1800s etc) move the result ahead five days or
            back two days, whichever is easier for you.

            Regards,

            Yusnier Viera.


            On Fri, Jan 7, 2011 at 3:31 PM, Jerry <wholphin48@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            >
            > FWIW, I developed this algorithm after watching "Rain Man" back in
            > 1989.....
            >
            > Example Date... 7/4/1976
            >
            > Start by noting the month number, 7 for July. For each month, I remember a
            > specific number...
            >
            > January, October 0
            > February, March, November 3
            > April, July 6
            > May 1
            > June 4
            > August 2
            > September, December 5
            >
            > Now, add the six for July to four, the day of the month in question. To
            > ten, add 5/4 times the last two digits of the year. Ignore any fractional
            > part of the answer.
            >
            > 10 + 76*5/4 = 10 + 95 = 105
            >
            > Last, divide the final total by seven.
            >
            > If remainder is 0, date was a sunday. If one, a monday etc.
            >
            > So the Bicentennial of the USA took place on a Sunday.
            >
            > Exception to rule: If month is January or February of a year divisible by
            > four, subtract one from the total.
            >
            > This method is good for the 1900 years or years any multiple of 400 years
            > more or less than the 1900 range.
            >
            > For the 2000 years ( 2400s or 1600s etc ) move the result back one day.
            >
            > For the 2100 years ( 2500s or 1700s etc) etc move the result ahead four
            > days
            >
            > For the 2200 years ( 2600s or 1800s etc) move the result ahead two days.
            >
            > If given dates in the same century, I can usually do this in a couple of
            > seconds. Changing centuries is like shifting gears.
            >
            > Jerry Newport
            >
            >
            > --- In MentalCalculation@yahoogroups.com<MentalCalculation%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > "JF" <jsh.flynn@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hey James/Nathan,
            > > >The memoriad software has a random date generator on it:
            > > http://www.memoriad.com/memoriadsoftware.asp
            > > >George's Pegasus files create random dates as well (go on the files
            > section of the group).
            > > >Random.org is another good customisable source of dates:
            > http://www.random.org/calendar-dates/
            > >
            > > Date calculations have their roots in the days when mental calculators
            > used to perform for people. Nowadays its a mental drag race and a useful way
            > to learn about the concept of modular division. Other than that it's a party
            > trick.
            > >
            > > Human computation skills need only be taught so far (the most the system
            > asks is that in theory a person should be able to add, subtract, multiply
            > and divide anything with just a pencil and some paper and honestly what more
            > do they need?).
            > >
            > > There's no empirical evidence drills such as these help in academic
            > performance but that's probably because experiments centralise around what
            > is essentially recall (addition of single digit numbers very quickly) rather
            > than understanding the logic behind it.
            > >
            > > -My philosophy: Want results? Get people to enjoy it.
            > >
            > > -Josh
            > >
            >
            >
            >



            --
            Yusnier Viera
            cell: (786)712-4787
            yusnierv@...
            www.yusnierviera.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Nathan Fields (Nth BarFields)
            Thanks, guys. I ve forwarded these messages to James. I wish I could have helped him more directly, but I m still rather a novice when it comes to mental
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 7, 2011
              Thanks, guys.

              I've forwarded these messages to James. I wish I could have helped him more
              directly, but I'm still rather a novice when it comes to mental calculating. In
              any event, James says thanks.


              Nathan Fields (Nth BarFields)
              www.mentathlete.blogspot.com
              www.facebook.com/nth.barfields


              "Some critics think the Internet is making us dumb. The Internet fundamentally
              changes the opportunity set. All the world’s knowledge and all the world’s
              garbage are both just one search away. The Internet appears to exacerbate innate
              tendencies — the smart get smarter while others will simply find new ways to
              waste time or inflict harm.(Tom Vander Ark)"




              ________________________________
              From: Yusnier Viera <yusnierv@...>
              To: MentalCalculation@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, January 7, 2011 1:53:46 PM
              Subject: Re: [Mental Calculation] Fw: [OATHSociety] Re: Savantism, Hacker
              Culture, and Calendrical Calculation


              Hi to everybody,

              Jerry, in my case I prefer to use

              *January, October 5
              February, March, November 1
              April, July 4
              May 6
              June 2
              August 0
              September, December 3*

              The only difference is that is good for the 2000 years or years any multiple
              of 400 years more or less than the 2000 range. An excellent algorithm for
              17th and 21st century it's good for mental calculator competitors since in
              the contest we have dates in the range between 1600 and 2100 and my
              algorithm is good for two out of the five centuries (1600 years and 2000
              years) which is an advantage.

              For the 1900 years ( 2400s or 1600s etc ) move the result ahead one day.

              For the 1800 years ( 2500s or 1700s etc) etc move the result ahead three
              days

              For the 1700 years ( 2600s or 1800s etc) move the result ahead five days or
              back two days, whichever is easier for you.

              Regards,

              Yusnier Viera.

              On Fri, Jan 7, 2011 at 3:31 PM, Jerry <wholphin48@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              >
              > FWIW, I developed this algorithm after watching "Rain Man" back in
              > 1989.....
              >
              > Example Date... 7/4/1976
              >
              > Start by noting the month number, 7 for July. For each month, I remember a
              > specific number...
              >
              > January, October 0
              > February, March, November 3
              > April, July 6
              > May 1
              > June 4
              > August 2
              > September, December 5
              >
              > Now, add the six for July to four, the day of the month in question. To
              > ten, add 5/4 times the last two digits of the year. Ignore any fractional
              > part of the answer.
              >
              > 10 + 76*5/4 = 10 + 95 = 105
              >
              > Last, divide the final total by seven.
              >
              > If remainder is 0, date was a sunday. If one, a monday etc.
              >
              > So the Bicentennial of the USA took place on a Sunday.
              >
              > Exception to rule: If month is January or February of a year divisible by
              > four, subtract one from the total.
              >
              > This method is good for the 1900 years or years any multiple of 400 years
              > more or less than the 1900 range.
              >
              > For the 2000 years ( 2400s or 1600s etc ) move the result back one day.
              >
              > For the 2100 years ( 2500s or 1700s etc) etc move the result ahead four
              > days
              >
              > For the 2200 years ( 2600s or 1800s etc) move the result ahead two days.
              >
              > If given dates in the same century, I can usually do this in a couple of
              > seconds. Changing centuries is like shifting gears.
              >
              > Jerry Newport
              >
              >
              > --- In MentalCalculation@yahoogroups.com<MentalCalculation%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > "JF" <jsh.flynn@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hey James/Nathan,
              > > >The memoriad software has a random date generator on it:
              > > http://www.memoriad.com/memoriadsoftware.asp
              > > >George's Pegasus files create random dates as well (go on the files
              > section of the group).
              > > >Random.org is another good customisable source of dates:
              > http://www.random.org/calendar-dates/
              > >
              > > Date calculations have their roots in the days when mental calculators
              > used to perform for people. Nowadays its a mental drag race and a useful way
              > to learn about the concept of modular division. Other than that it's a party
              > trick.
              > >
              > > Human computation skills need only be taught so far (the most the system
              > asks is that in theory a person should be able to add, subtract, multiply
              > and divide anything with just a pencil and some paper and honestly what more
              > do they need?).
              > >
              > > There's no empirical evidence drills such as these help in academic
              > performance but that's probably because experiments centralise around what
              > is essentially recall (addition of single digit numbers very quickly) rather
              > than understanding the logic behind it.
              > >
              > > -My philosophy: Want results? Get people to enjoy it.
              > >
              > > -Josh
              > >
              >
              >
              >

              --
              Yusnier Viera
              cell: (786)712-4787
              yusnierv@...
              www.yusnierviera.com

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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