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Potter Valley and Eel River

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  • George Chaniot
    10 May 2014 -- The annual Peregrine Audubon Field Trip to Potter Valley and Eel River went off today with eleven people participating. We visited The Old
    Message 1 of 5 , May 10, 2014
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      10 May 2014 -- The annual Peregrine Audubon Field Trip to Potter Valley and
      Eel River went off today with eleven people participating. We visited The
      Old Bridge on Potter Valley Road, the Pioneer Crossing Bridge on the Eel,
      the old logging road upstream from the bridge, Trout Creek campground, Cape
      Horn Dam, and Burris Lane. Some highlights were WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS, a
      very cooperative MACGILLIVRAY's WARBLER seen well by all, and a
      YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT all at the Pioneer Bridge, and a LAZULI BUNTING and an
      OLIVE-SiDED FLYCATCHER along the logging road.

      A full list is below. Maybe some of the participants can help me proof
      it.

      George Chaniot
      Potter Valley, MEN, CA

      Wood Duck
      Mallard
      Wild Turkey
      California Quail
      Pied-billed Grebe
      Double-crested Cormorant
      Turkey Vulture
      Osprey
      Bald Eagle
      Red-shouldered Hawk
      Red-tailed Hawk
      Golden Eagle
      American Kestrel
      American Coot
      Killdeer
      Spotted Sandpiper
      Rock Pigeon
      Rock Pigeon
      Eurasian Collared-Dove
      Mourning Dove
      White-throated Swift
      Anna's Hummingbird
      Acorn Woodpecker
      Red-breasted Sapsucker
      Northern Flicker
      Pileated Woodpecker
      Olive-sided Flycatcher
      Western Wood-Pewee
      Pacific-slope Flycatcher
      Black Phoebe
      Ash-throated Flycatcher
      Western Kingbird
      Cassin's Vireo
      Warbling Vireo
      Steller's Jay
      Common Raven
      Tree Swallow
      N. Rough-winged Swallow
      Cliff Swallow
      Barn Swallow
      Chestnut-backed Chickadee
      Bushtit
      White-breasted Nuthatch
      American Dipper
      House Wren
      American Robin
      Northern Mockingbird
      European Starling
      Orange-crowned Warbler
      Nashville Warbler
      Yellow Warbler
      Hermit Warbler
      MacGillivray's Warbler
      Wilson's Warbler
      Yellow-breasted Chat
      Western Tanager
      Spotted Towhee
      California Towhee
      Chipping Sparrow
      Lark Sparrow
      Song Sparrow
      Oregon D-e Junco
      Black-headed Grosbeak
      Lazuli Bunting
      Red-winged Blackbird
      Western Meadowlark
      Brewer's Blackbird
      Brown-headed Cowbird
      Bullock's Oriole
      Lesser Goldfinch
      70 species bluebird? scrub-jay? crow? house finch?
    • Kate Marianchild
      Hello Birders, I met Krissa Klein at Mill Creek Pond on Monday and she showed me six or seven nests of various species that she d found. One was a titmouse
      Message 2 of 5 , May 13, 2014
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        Hello Birders, 

        I met Krissa Klein at Mill Creek Pond on Monday and she showed me six or seven nests of various species that she'd found. One was a titmouse nest in a hollow steel fence post. The parents were bringing large lepidopteran larvae, but they weren't coming as often as I thought they should be. I told her what I knew: that those posts are death traps for ash-throated flycatchers. They like open-topped nests, but they get trapped in steel fence posts because they can't spread their wings to fly out. I'd never heard of oak titmice using the posts as nest cavities. The adults were obviously small enough to fly in and out (we watched them doing that), but I knew that baby titmice fledge by jumping out of their nest cavities and I couldn't imagine they would be able to climb up the inside of a steel post. Neither of us had a flashlight to peer down into it to see how far along the babies were. One of the parents performed the wing-quivering begging display on the top of the post, which seemed odd and made us think the parents might be at their wits' end and the chicks might be at risk of imminent abandonment. After Krissa left I poked some long cattail fronds into the post and determined that the babies were at the bottom, about four feet down. That night I ran into  Krissa  and said I thought it was important for one of us to get back there ASAP. She offered to go the next morning (Sunday). On Sunday afternoon I got this email from her:

        Titmice have been rescued!

        Hi Kate,
        Three baby titmice have fledged! It ended up being easier than I thought, when I realized I could just tip the fencepost over. Two of the babies climbed out immediately, to the delight of the parents.

        I tipped the post over even more to get the last one free, because it seemed stuck, and found that there was a dead and rotting fourth one in there with them, so it's a good thing we got them out.

        When I left the parents were leading them off up the hill towards some bushes.



        I have a picture from Krissa of a chick on the ground in front of the tipped-over post, but I can't figure out how to post it on Mendobirds (do I have to start an album?)


        Kate
      • Janet King
        Hi Kate’ It is important that fence posts that are not capped be capped. Metal, pvc or other slippery material post become death traps for baby birds and
        Message 3 of 5 , May 13, 2014
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          Hi Kate’
          It is important that fence posts that are not capped be capped.  Metal, pvc or other slippery material post become death traps for baby birds and other small critters.  We all need to alert the public to this hazard.    Thanks, for this post.    Janet King
           
          Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 10:09 AM
          Subject: [Mendobirds] Rescue of titmouse chicks
           
           

          Hello Birders,

           
          I met Krissa Klein at Mill Creek Pond on Monday and she showed me six or seven nests of various species that she'd found. One was a titmouse nest in a hollow steel fence post. The parents were bringing large lepidopteran larvae, but they weren't coming as often as I thought they should be. I told her what I knew: that those posts are death traps for ash-throated flycatchers. They like open-topped nests, but they get trapped in steel fence posts because they can't spread their wings to fly out. I'd never heard of oak titmice using the posts as nest cavities. The adults were obviously small enough to fly in and out (we watched them doing that), but I knew that baby titmice fledge by jumping out of their nest cavities and I couldn't imagine they would be able to climb up the inside of a steel post. Neither of us had a flashlight to peer down into it to see how far along the babies were. One of the parents performed the wing-q! uivering begging display on the top of the post, which seemed odd and made us think the parents might be at their wits' end and the chicks might be at risk of imminent abandonment. After Krissa left I poked some long cattail fronds into the post and determined that the babies were at the bottom, about four feet down. That night I ran into  Krissa  and said I thought it was important for one of us to get back there ASAP. She offered to go the next morning (Sunday). On Sunday afternoon I got this email from her:
           
          Titmice have been rescued!
           
          Hi Kate,
          Three baby titmice have fledged! It ended up being easier than I thought, when I realized I could just tip the fencepost over. Two of the babies climbed out immediately, to the delight of the parents.
           
          I tipped the post over even more to get the last one free, because it seemed stuck, and found that there was! a dead and rotting fourth one in there with them, so it's a good thin g we got them out.
           
          When I left the parents were leading them off up the hill towards some bushes.
           
           
           
          I have a picture from Krissa of a chick on the ground in front of the tipped-over post, but I can't figure out how to post it on Mendobirds (do I have to start an album?)
           
           
          Kate
        • Rick & Jeanne Jackson
          Would it be possible for you to post a photo of the fence post – or send one to me? I would be happy to write about this in my nature column but showing
          Message 4 of 5 , May 13, 2014
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            Would it be possible for you to post a photo of the fence post – or send one to me? I would be happy to write about this in my nature column but showing people is always best. Thanks, Jeanne, Anchor Bay
            Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 11:31 AM
            Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] Rescue of titmouse chicks
             

            Hi Kate’
            It is important that fence posts that are not capped be capped.  Metal, pvc or other slippery material post become death traps for baby birds and other small critters.  We all need to alert the public to this hazard.    Thanks, for this post.    Janet King
             
            Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 10:09 AM
            Subject: [Mendobirds] Rescue of titmouse chicks
             
             

            Hello Birders,

             
            I met Krissa Klein at Mill Creek Pond on Monday and she showed me six or seven nests of various species that she'd found. One was a titmouse nest in a hollow steel fence post. The parents were bringing large lepidopteran larvae, but they weren't coming as often as I thought they should be. I told her what I knew: that those posts are death traps for ash-throated flycatchers. They like open-topped nests, but they get trapped in steel fence posts because they can't spread their wings to fly out. I'd never heard of oak titmice using the posts as nest cavities. The adults were obviously small enough to fly in and out (we watched them doing that), but I knew that baby titmice fledge by jumping out of their nest cavities and I couldn't imagine they would be able to climb up the inside of a steel post. Neither of us had a flashlight to peer down into it to see how far along the babies were. One of the parents performed the wing-q! uivering begging display on the top of the post, which seemed odd and made us think the parents might be at their wits' end and the chicks might be at risk of imminent abandonment. After Krissa left I poked some long cattail fronds into the post and determined that the babies were at the bottom, about four feet down. That night I ran into  Krissa  and said I thought it was important for one of us to get back there ASAP. She offered to go the next morning (Sunday). On Sunday afternoon I got this email from her:
             
            Titmice have been rescued!
             
            Hi Kate,
            Three baby titmice have fledged! It ended up being easier than I thought, when I realized I could just tip the fencepost over. Two of the babies climbed out immediately, to the delight of the parents.
             
            I tipped the post over even more to get the last one free, because it seemed stuck, and found that there was! a dead and rotting fourth one in there with them, so it's a good thin g we got them out.
             
            When I left the parents were leading them off up the hill towards some bushes.
             
             
             
            I have a picture from Krissa of a chick on the ground in front of the tipped-over post, but I can't figure out how to post it on Mendobirds (do I have to start an album?)
             
             
            Kate
          • Diane Hichwa
            A great Rescue job! And an important warning to pass on that hollow metal fence posts need to be capped. From: Rick & Jeanne Jackson jackson2@mcn.org
            Message 5 of 5 , May 13, 2014
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              A great Rescue job!  And an important warning to pass on that hollow metal fence posts need to be capped.

              From: "'Rick & Jeanne Jackson' jackson2@... [Mendobirds]" <Mendobirds@yahoogroups.com>
              Reply-To: Jeanne & Rick Jackson <jackson2@...>
              Date: Tue, 13 May 2014 11:40:24 -0700
              To: Janet King <kingfarm@...>, Kate Marianchild <katem@...>, Mendobirds <mendobirds@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] Rescue of titmouse chicks

               

              Would it be possible for you to post a photo of the fence post – or send one to me? I would be happy to write about this in my nature column but showing people is always best. Thanks, Jeanne, Anchor Bay
              Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 11:31 AM
              Subject: Re: [Mendobirds] Rescue of titmouse chicks
               

              Hi Kate’
              It is important that fence posts that are not capped be capped.  Metal, pvc or other slippery material post become death traps for baby birds and other small critters.  We all need to alert the public to this hazard.    Thanks, for this post.    Janet King
               
              Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2014 10:09 AM
              Subject: [Mendobirds] Rescue of titmouse chicks
               
               

              Hello Birders,

               
              I met Krissa Klein at Mill Creek Pond on Monday and she showed me six or seven nests of various species that she'd found. One was a titmouse nest in a hollow steel fence post. The parents were bringing large lepidopteran larvae, but they weren't coming as often as I thought they should be. I told her what I knew: that those posts are death traps for ash-throated flycatchers. They like open-topped nests, but they get trapped in steel fence posts because they can't spread their wings to fly out. I'd never heard of oak titmice using the posts as nest cavities. The adults were obviously small enough to fly in and out (we watched them doing that), but I knew that baby titmice fledge by jumping out of their nest cavities and I couldn't imagine they would be able to climb up the inside of a steel post. Neither of us had a flashlight to peer down into it to see how far along the babies were. One of the parents performed the wing-q! uivering begging display on the top of the post, which seemed odd and made us think the parents might be at their wits' end and the chicks might be at risk of imminent abandonment. After Krissa left I poked some long cattail fronds into the post and determined that the babies were at the bottom, about four feet down. That night I ran into  Krissa  and said I thought it was important for one of us to get back there ASAP. She offered to go the next morning (Sunday). On Sunday afternoon I got this email from her:
               
              Titmice have been rescued!
               
              Hi Kate,
              Three baby titmice have fledged! It ended up being easier than I thought, when I realized I could just tip the fencepost over. Two of the babies climbed out immediately, to the delight of the parents.
               
              I tipped the post over even more to get the last one free, because it seemed stuck, and found that there was! a dead and rotting fourth one in there with them, so it's a good thin g we got them out.
               
              When I left the parents were leading them off up the hill towards some bushes.
               
               
               
              I have a picture from Krissa of a chick on the ground in front of the tipped-over post, but I can't figure out how to post it on Mendobirds (do I have to start an album?)
               
               
              Kate

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