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Re: [Mendobirds] strange ravens

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  • Feather Forestwalker
    Hi, Jessica, I think Ron LeValley hit the nail on the head with regards to the territoriality of their behavior. When ravens are beginning their pair-bonding,
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 23, 2003
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      Hi, Jessica,

      I think Ron LeValley hit the nail on the head with regards to the
      territoriality of their behavior. When ravens are beginning their
      pair-bonding, several females will choose from the group of males, and
      the strongest, most aggressive birds are usually the ones that pair up.
      This is referrering to the first time, since it is known that ravens
      will mate for life and are usually extremely territorial in that they
      chase out interlopers from their breeding territory. The mated pairs
      that have a nest will protect their nest sitte and surrounding area
      starting in late December / early January. You may have noticed groups
      of four or more ravens flying cosely together, heads down in a
      fluffy-head display, females "clokking", males calling. That would be a
      group that is attempting pairing. At other times you may see a pair
      aggressively and very actively chasing off another pair or even four or
      more ravens. That would be a mated pair being territorial.

      Since there was, from your description, a group of them, I would assume
      that there's at least one female in that group that doesn't enjoy the
      competetition she's getting from the others. Males in particular, will
      hammer on a tree branch when agitated by the sight of a predator or
      other threat to the nest area and call incessantly, even at times
      swooping down or over the perceived interloper, but females will chase
      away their rivals. So, they're seeing themselves in the glass and
      assuming they are other females that are acting rather strangely -
      especially considering that the reflection is doing exactly the same
      thing as she is, without regard for "personal space," as it were. If you
      watch them on the rooftops, the moment a competing bird gets "too close"
      to a female in display, that female will peck at her repeatedly.

      Hope that's helped some? I've been watching ravens for a lot of years
      and reading up on their behavior - I especially enjoyed Bernd Heinrich's
      works on the Northern Ravens (Corvus corax principalis) of Maine and
      Vermont. Some of that behavior can be translated into our mixed group of
      Northern and Western Ravens, (Corvus corax sinuatus) I am sure.

      Have a great day,

      Feather
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