Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Lake Cleone SUMMER TANAGER

Expand Messages
  • Joe Parker
    This afternoon, Sat. Sept. 12, the male SUMMER TANAGER was still at Lake Cleone. Take the boardwalk on the north side of the lake from the parking lot. About
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 12, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      This afternoon, Sat. Sept. 12, the male SUMMER TANAGER was still at Lake Cleone. Take the boardwalk on the north side of the lake from the parking lot. About 20 feet before the boardwalk becomes asphalt, a large blackberry bush reaches over the trail. At 3:00 this afternoon, the bird was feeding in this bush.

      Kathy Parker
      Los Gatos
    • Jessica Morton
      Last weekend, I met a couple from Oakland who were enjoying the Tanager in its clearing habitat. They told me it s feeding on bees living in or near the
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 13, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Last weekend, I met a couple from Oakland who were enjoying the
        Tanager in its clearing habitat. They told me it's feeding on bees
        living in or near the clearing; you may know that bees become active
        only when the sun shines on their hive/nest. The Tanager bashed a bee
        in its beak against a tree limb, before removing the sting and then
        eating the bee. This could explain why I never saw the bird after work
        (three tries!), but did at mid-day, when the bees had warmed up enough
        to become part of the food chain again.
        Good birding!
      • Lisa Walker (Feather)
        Hi, Jessica, The bee s are actually yellow-jackets. You are correct about their habit of wandering in and out of their ground-based hive when the sun warms
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 13, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi, Jessica,

          The 'bee's' are actually yellow-jackets. You are correct about their habit of wandering in and out of their ground-based hive when the sun warms it. That was how I was able to find the Tanager.

          It's amazing to me how many people have come by to see him and still he remains. He is sooo beautiful and I count myself fortunate to have even seen him and witnessed the same feeding behavior you described.

          Feather


          --- On Sun, 9/13/09, Jessica Morton <jessica@...> wrote:

          From: Jessica Morton <jessica@...>
          Subject: [Mendobirds] Re:Lake Cleone SUMMER TANAGER
          To: Mendobirds@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, September 13, 2009, 9:16 AM






           





          Last weekend, I met a couple from Oakland who were enjoying the

          Tanager in its clearing habitat. They told me it's feeding on bees

          living in or near the clearing; you may know that bees become active

          only when the sun shines on their hive/nest. The Tanager bashed a bee

          in its beak against a tree limb, before removing the sting and then

          eating the bee. This could explain why I never saw the bird after work

          (three tries!), but did at mid-day, when the bees had warmed up enough

          to become part of the food chain again.

          Good birding!


























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.