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vernal pool

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  • Kate Marianchild
    Monday at 5:30 p.m. at the vernal pool on the Mendocino Headlands there were about 28 red-necked phalaropes, 2 dunlin (in breeding plumage), 6-8 dowitchers,
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2006
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      Monday at 5:30 p.m. at the vernal pool on the Mendocino Headlands there
      were about 28 red-necked phalaropes, 2 dunlin (in breeding plumage),
      6-8 dowitchers, both long and short-billed, I believe, 70 western and
      semi-palmated(?) sandpipers, and 6 Canada Geese. For such a small pool
      it was teeming with life.

      I also pinpointed the nest site of a pair of Northern Harriers. I saw
      them flying together, low, and the male was carrying something small
      like a mouse or vole. I believe they performed a mid-air transfer, but
      I adjusted my binoculars at just the wrong time and missed it. They
      each landed immediately after, the female disappearing into what I
      think is the nest site, and the male landing a distance away without
      prey. I later saw the male carry a piece of dried grass to the assumed
      nest site, and leave carrying nothing.

      I had never seen a pair together before. The difference between the
      grey male and brown female is quite striking.

      Kate
    • AlbionWood
      Saturday, May 6, there were still about a dozen phalaropes at the rapidly-shrinking vernal pool on the Mendocino headlands. Also four Canada geese, but no
      Message 2 of 2 , May 8, 2006
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        Saturday, May 6, there were still about a dozen phalaropes at the
        rapidly-shrinking vernal pool on the Mendocino headlands. Also four
        Canada geese, but no other shorebirds that I saw. A Harrier was hunting
        the meadow, as usual.


        Tim
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