Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

PROPOSAL TO KILL BARRED OWLS !

Expand Messages
  • zenzoolittle
    Subject: Proposal To Kill Barred Owls for the WCD, from Stan Moore: Folks -- There are certainly precedents in raptor management history of removing raptors by
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 18, 2005
      Subject: Proposal To Kill Barred Owls

      for the WCD,
      from Stan Moore:

      Folks --

      There are certainly precedents in raptor management
      history of removing raptors by lethal and non-lethal
      means to promote protection of other protected
      (endangered) raptors. We know that great horned owls
      were killed in order to promote survival of endangered
      peregrine falcon chicks at hacksites in the Midwestern
      United States. We know that golden eagles have been
      removed from some of the Channel Islands off the coast
      of California recently by non-lethal means to promote
      recovery of endangered bald eagles. Burrowing owls
      have been removed to protect least terns. And so on
      and so forth.

      We also know that past and current long-term forestry
      practices across the North American continent have
      resulted in an expansion of the range of barred owls
      which have now expanded right across North America
      into the range of spotted owls. Spotted owls are
      imperiled and listed under the Endangered Species Act
      in some of their populations. The same forestry
      management practices which resulted in the expansion
      of range of barred owls were the primary cause of
      endangerment of spotted owls. Now barred owls
      themselves pose a real and growing threat to the
      future persistence of spotted owls.

      A proposed potential "solution" that is now being
      explored and is reported on today by CNN at
      http://www.cnn.com is to experiment with barred owl
      "removal" by shooting barred owls in a particular
      study area in order to determine if removal of the
      barred owls benefits spotted owls.

      Everyone can read the CNN article below, but I would
      tend to heavily respect the view of Eric Forsman, who
      is probably the leading authority on spotted owls.
      This plan cannot succeed at all in the short term.
      Without forestry practices that allow habitat recovery
      over many hundreds, if not thousands of years, this
      plan to shoot barred owls is doomed, but could be a
      nice employment program for a few biologists and
      "shooters". This entire situation is a lose-lose
      situation, and the question is whether we want to kill
      barred owls for being barred owls. It is greatly
      complicated because I believe that all of us would
      like to preserve and protect spotted owls, which are
      endangered with potential extinction, while barred
      owls are not.

      Here is the CNN article:


      Scientists plan owl 'removal' experiment
      June 17, 2005 Posted: 12:00 PM EDT (1600
      GMT)


      Scientists are planning to kill a small number of
      barred owls who they say are crowding out the
      threatened spotted owl in northern California.

      ARCATA, California (AP) -- Federal scientists are
      planning to shoot a small number of barred owls they
      say are crowding out the threatened spotted owl in
      northern California -- an experiment that could lead
      to killing thousands of the larger owls on the West
      Coast.

      Scientists said the "removal" experiment would be the
      best way to quickly determine whether barred owls are
      pushing spotted owls toward extinction. If successful,
      officials would then consider expanding the program.

      "This experiment is a small step," said Brian
      Woodbridge, a biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
      Service office in Yreka, California.

      The final plan was being discussed at a meeting of
      spotted owl experts Wednesday at Humboldt State
      University in Arcata, he said. The experiment could
      start as early as next week.

      Scientists said the northern spotted owls, which
      became a symbol of environmentalists' efforts to
      preserve the old-growth forests on the West Coast, are
      competing with the more common barred owls for nesting
      places and food. The barred owls, which have migrated
      to west from the Great Plains, also kill the spotted
      owls.

      There are no hard numbers on how many spotted owls or
      barred owls are in the West, but some estimates put
      spotted owls at about 8,000 pairs. Barred owls appear
      to greatly outnumber spotted owls in Washington, and
      are about even in Oregon, according to some estimates.

      The experiment site, in the southern Cascade Range, is
      bordered on three sides by mountains and contains only
      eight to 11 barred owls and 32 spotted owls,
      Woodbridge said. Barred owls have already displaced
      two spotted owl pairs and are crowding a third in the
      area.

      The California Academy of Sciences, which has agreed
      to take part in the experiment, already has permits
      from the Fish and Wildlife Service and the California
      Department of Fish and Game to shoot up to 20 barred
      owls for museum studies, meaning the experiment does
      not require a lengthy environmental impact statement.

      Some experts, however, say even if the experiment is
      successful, it will be hard to stop the migration of
      the barred owls.

      "Assuming you find removal is working -- spotted owls
      move back into their territories -- are you prepared
      to do that for the next 10,000 years? Because as soon
      as you stop you're right back where you started," said
      Eric Forsman, a spotted owl biologist for the U.S.
      Forest Service.

      The invasion also could have far-reaching
      ramifications for timberland owners, who log under
      habitat protection plans to maintain spotted owls.
      Some of those plans would allow more logging if
      spotted owls disappear; others could allow less.

      "This is creating a lot of anxiety for us," said
      Lowell Diller, a biologist for Green Diamond Resources
      Co., which owns 450,000 acres of timber east of
      Redwood National Park in Northern California.

      Susan Ash, conservation director for the Audubon
      Society of Portland, whose lawsuit resulted in spotted
      owl protections, said her group supports research, but
      has concerns about killing barred owls.

      "I don't feel we should just jump into something
      without getting a sense of the feelings of all the
      interest groups," she said.

      for the WCD





      ______________________________________________________________________
      __
      ______________________________________________________________________
      __

      Message: 11
      Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2005 22:27:43 -0000
      From: "WCD" <wildlifeconservationdepartment@...>
      Subject: Protest against proposed barred owl cull is entirely
      justifiable

      for the WCD,
      from Stan Moore:

      Killing Barred Owls

      > The California Academy of Sciences, which has agreed
      > to take part in the experiment, already has permits
      > from the Fish and Wildlife Service and the
      > California
      > Department of Fish and Game to shoot up to 20 barred
      > owls for museum studies, meaning the experiment does
      > not require a lengthy environmental impact
      > statement.


      In my view, this issuing of permits for "museum
      studies" is no less a travesty than plans to shoot
      marsh harriers in Austria for the alleged purpose of
      "food habits studies", which provoked international
      outrage. The California Academy of Sciences does not
      need to shoot barred owls to obtain specimens in this
      day and age when rehabbers can provide specimens over
      time, when the Department of Fish and Game and the
      Fish and Wildlife Service can help locate roadkilled
      owls and find other sources for museum specimens.

      This entire operation is obviously a management
      endeavor, not a research effort. For at least fifteen
      years spotted owl biologists have been warning in all
      sorts of publications of the threat of barred owls
      displacing spotted owls. Displacement has already
      been well-documented. Because barred owl populations
      in the range of spotted owls are already
      well-established, the initiation of such a program of
      shooting barred owls to protect spotted owls means
      that the ONLY way the program can be effective will be
      to maintain it indefinitely till the last barred owl
      is removed from the range of spotted owls, which could
      mean killing thousands and thousands of barred owls.
      And even then, there is no guarantee of success,
      particularly as long as habitat is managed under the
      same paradigm that invites barred owls into occupied
      spotted owl habitat.

      In my view, the only possible justification for
      shooting barred owls would be in the context of a
      campaign to restore habitat quality for spotted owls
      across the entire range of spotted owls. This would
      mean altering forestry practices on both public and
      private lands for hundreds of years.

      Killing barred owls is the simplistic solution to a
      complex problem. It may seem to buy some time for
      spotted owls, but unless forestry management changes,
      it is reasonable to believe that spotted owls will
      eventually become extinct with or without barred owls
      in their habitats.

      The greatest immediate concern in my mind is that the
      ploy of using collection of museum specimens to avoid
      environmental impact review for this sort of project
      is an abuse of the scientific process and a disservice
      to the public. Why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
      and the California Department of Fish and Game would
      issue these permits for taking of museum specimens in
      the State of California by shooting is a huge question
      in my own mind. This is a matter that begs public
      protest against the California Academy of Sciences,
      the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the California
      Department of Fish and Game.

      Where is the animal protectionist movement on this
      issues?

      Stan Moore
      San Geronimo, CA

      for the WCD

      re-posted by Lisa C.
    • Talon Tours
      This may not be the format to discuss this particular issue but for lack of the knowledge of another place I would ask if there is yet any group standing
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 19, 2005
        This may not be the format to discuss this particular
        issue but for lack of the knowledge of another place I
        would ask if there is yet any group standing against
        this present 'short term' thinking by the biological
        community.
        Once again biologists fill their 'godlike' role of
        taking life for another experiment. It would seem
        obvious that there can be no long term success from
        this mistake.

        Sincerely,
        Ken Wilson

        --- zenzoolittle <wildview@...> wrote:

        > Subject: Proposal To Kill Barred Owls
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.