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White-throated Swifts

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  • john_e_hunter@fws.gov
    Mendo birders, On 3-7-05 I saw at least 4 White-throated Swifts (along with some Violet-green Swallows) flying beneath and exploring potential nest sites under
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 10, 2005
      Mendo birders,

      On 3-7-05 I saw at least 4 White-throated Swifts (along with some
      Violet-green Swallows) flying beneath and exploring potential nest sites
      under the north end of the Hwy. 101 bridge over the South Fork Eel River
      just a few miles south of the Humboldt County line. The north end of this
      long bridge is at milepost 103 on Hwy. 101.

      A few miles north in Humboldt County on the same day I had 7-10
      White-throated Swifts along with Violet-green Swallows exploring the Wagner
      Bridge.

      John E. Hunter
      Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office
      1655 Heindon Road
      Arcata, CA 95521
      707-822-7201 (phone)
      707-822-8136 (fax)
      John_E_Hunter@...
    • George Chaniot
      Tue, 04 Jun 2013 -- This morning Park Steiner, Scott Harris, and I saw at least six WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS at the Pioneer Crossing Bridge on the Eel River north
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 4, 2013
        Tue, 04 Jun 2013 -- This morning Park Steiner, Scott Harris, and I saw at
        least six WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS at the Pioneer Crossing Bridge on the Eel
        River north of Potter Valley where we saw them on the 11 May Peregrine
        Audubon field trip. Scott says that he has been seeing them regularly for
        about a month and that they have been nesting in the outer two drain holes
        beneath the north end of the span. Today they were making spectacular low
        passes over the bridge at close range. They tend to be absent for 10-15
        minutes and then appear suddenly like gangbusters.

        George Chaniot
        Potter Valley, MEN, CA
      • George Chaniot
        Sat, 22 Mar 2014 -- This afternoon around 5 PM I went to the Pioneer Bridge over the Eel River N. of Potter Valley to look for the WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 23, 2014
          Sat, 22 Mar 2014 -- This afternoon around 5 PM I went to the Pioneer Bridge
          over the Eel River N. of Potter Valley to look for the WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS
          reported by Steve Stump on March 20th. They were an easy find. At least 5
          were flying around the bridge the whole period I was there. One was
          fluttering around a drain hole on the underside of the bridge - as were
          Northern Rough-winged Swallows. Last year the swifts apparently nested here
          for the first time, and the prospects look good for this year.

          George Chaniot
          Potter Valley, MEN, CA

          From Route 20 take Potter Valley Road, and follow it until it turns into
          Eastside Road. At Hopper's Corner turn right (N) onto Eel River Road.
          Follow it "over the hill" to the Eel River drainage. Take the right fork at
          the top of the hill and follow it to the bridge.
        • Robert Keiffer
          4 April 2016 - I followed up on Roger Adamson s discovery of White-throated Swifts at Frog Woman Rock south of Hopland.   I had been monitoring the site
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 5, 2016
            4 April 2016 - I followed up on Roger Adamson's discovery of White-throated Swifts at Frog Woman Rock south of Hopland.   I had been monitoring the site throughout February and March because during the prior two years White-throated Swifts were found from early February through late February and into March, but for some reason they did not show up this year until Roger's discovery last week.   Yesterday (4/4) I was able to find at least one bird at around 9:30-9:45 am.    There were probably more birds there, but I was only able to see one at a time before it would disappear from sight to the west side of the rock, with the same or another bird appearing again a few minutes later.   Two times I watched a bird fly across the face of the rock, but high up near the top.   On a side note, I saw the pair of Peregrine Falcons swoop down to the face of rock ... and I think they are nesting behind a 3' x 3' tuft of grass that is on the far right side of a crack-like ledge (the historical nesting ledge).

            The best place to view is from the east side of Highway 101, behind the orange markers that close the one north-bound lane.    One should enter this area while driving northbound in order to be safe.  Traffic moves extremely fast through this area.

            Good birding.  Bob Keiffer   Hopland   rjkeiffer@... 
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