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RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate

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  • Diane~~DSMDesignz
    Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my own business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office to start out. But
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 26, 2008
      Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my own
      business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office to start
      out.
      But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost productive
      for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my school was
      telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look for those
      kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was just an
      advertising tactic for the school.

      -------Original Message-------

      From: Lin
      Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
      To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate

      Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee working from
      home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-house
      position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most offices
      outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee from home
      is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.

      If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the risks to
      them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might want to
      have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.





      Linda Walker

      Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
      <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
      A division of K&L Media, LLC
      <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

      Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry







      From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
      Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
      To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate



      Hi,
      I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to work from
      home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers, business
      cards, etc).
      I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's worth
      going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our local
      hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
      I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as what to
      do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
      appreciate any help anyone can give.
      Thanks,
      Diane

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lin
      The overhead costs are more to you as an employee because of hardware/software issues, the risk/liability issues arise within HIPAA and your position. As an
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 26, 2008
        The overhead costs are more to you as an employee because of
        hardware/software issues, the risk/liability issues arise within HIPAA and
        your position. As an employee rather than a third party billing company
        imposes a much greater liability issue working from home than a medical
        billing company with E/O insurance and of course their position as a third
        party medical billing company they would (in most cases) be operating as a
        Business Associate with an BA Agreement.





        Linda Walker

        Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
        <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
        A division of K&L Media, LLC
        <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

        Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry







        From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
        Sent: Saturday, April 26, 2008 11:14 PM
        To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate



        Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my own
        business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office to start
        out.
        But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost productive
        for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my school was
        telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look for those
        kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was just an
        advertising tactic for the school.

        -------Original Message-------

        From: Lin
        Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
        To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>

        Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate

        Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee working from
        home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-house
        position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most offices
        outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee from home
        is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.

        If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the risks to
        them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might want to
        have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.





        Linda Walker

        Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
        <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
        A division of K&L Media, LLC
        <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

        Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry







        From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
        [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com> ]
        On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
        Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
        To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>

        Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate



        Hi,
        I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to work from
        home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers, business
        cards, etc).
        I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's worth
        going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our local
        hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
        I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as what to
        do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
        appreciate any help anyone can give.
        Thanks,
        Diane

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Melinda
        I totally agree with Lin. I would just keep plugging away. I offered some suggestions earlier on the post and you can also check out the MAB (Medical
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 27, 2008
          I totally agree with Lin. I would just keep plugging away. I
          offered some suggestions earlier on the post and you can also check
          out the MAB (Medical Association of Billers) web site
          http://p100.ezboard.com/bmedicalassociationofbillers

          and you can check out what others have said. Part of the forum is
          restricted to members only, but you can check out the following
          without joining the MAB:

          'Help Wanted Section' and 'Questions Asked More Than Once' and under
          that 'Questions Asked A Thousand Times'. They might offer some
          suggestions from those who have come before you and "been there, done
          that."

          Melinda Brown, CMBS
          Ins Biller

          --- In MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com, "Lin" <italiandoll1967@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
          working from
          > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
          house
          > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
          offices
          > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
          from home
          > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
          >
          > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
          risks to
          > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
          want to
          > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Linda Walker
          >
          > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
          > <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
          > A division of K&L Media, LLC
          > <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com
          >
          > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
          > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
          > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
          > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi,
          > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
          work from
          > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
          business
          > cards, etc).
          > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
          worth
          > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
          local
          > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
          > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
          what to
          > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
          > appreciate any help anyone can give.
          > Thanks,
          > Diane
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Melinda
          Diane, From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a physician in
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 27, 2008
            Diane,

            From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
            you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
            physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
            in-house employee and outsourcing.

            Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
            in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
            afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
            though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
            bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
            then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
            adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
            with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

            One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
            billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
            essentially "uncollectable"; because they are so old or so messed up
            that no one can collect on them.

            There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
            billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
            or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
            home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
            good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
            burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
            sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
            agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
            are embezeling.

            Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

            Melinda Brown, CMBS
            Ins Biller

            --- In MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com, Diane~~DSMDesignz
            <DSMDesignz@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
            own
            > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
            to start
            > out.
            > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
            productive
            > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
            school was
            > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
            for those
            > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
            just an
            > advertising tactic for the school.
            >
            > -------Original Message-------
            >
            > From: Lin
            > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
            > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
            >
            > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
            working from
            > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
            house
            > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
            offices
            > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
            from home
            > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
            >
            > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
            risks to
            > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
            want to
            > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Linda Walker
            >
            > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
            > <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
            > A division of K&L Media, LLC
            > <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com
            >
            > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
            > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
            > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
            > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi,
            > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
            work from
            > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
            business
            > cards, etc).
            > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
            worth
            > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
            local
            > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
            > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
            what to
            > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
            > appreciate any help anyone can give.
            > Thanks,
            > Diane
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Lin
            I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own billing company. What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don t want to
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
              I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
              billing company.

              What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
              control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
              billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
              strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
              the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
              control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
              income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
              have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
              medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
              getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
              to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
              doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
              hire in-house staff.

              I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
              practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
              staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
              staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
              both in-house and outsourced billing.





              Linda Walker

              Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
              <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
              A division of K&L Media, LLC
              <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

              Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry









              From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of Melinda
              Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
              To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate



              Diane,

              From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
              you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
              physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
              in-house employee and outsourcing.

              Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
              in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
              afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
              though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
              bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
              then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
              adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
              with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

              One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
              billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
              essentially "uncollectable"; because they are so old or so messed up
              that no one can collect on them.

              There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
              billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
              or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
              home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
              good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
              burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
              sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
              agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
              are embezeling.

              Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

              Melinda Brown, CMBS
              Ins Biller

              --- In MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
              <DSMDesignz@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
              own
              > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
              to start
              > out.
              > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
              productive
              > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
              school was
              > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
              for those
              > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
              just an
              > advertising tactic for the school.
              >
              > -------Original Message-------
              >
              > From: Lin
              > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
              > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
              >
              > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
              working from
              > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
              house
              > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
              offices
              > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
              from home
              > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
              >
              > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
              risks to
              > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
              want to
              > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Linda Walker
              >
              > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
              > <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
              > A division of K&L Media, LLC
              > <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com
              >
              > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
              [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com> ]
              > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
              > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
              > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
              >
              >
              >
              > Hi,
              > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
              work from
              > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
              business
              > cards, etc).
              > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
              worth
              > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
              local
              > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
              > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
              what to
              > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
              > appreciate any help anyone can give.
              > Thanks,
              > Diane
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Terry Pierce
              Hi Linda, I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                Hi Linda,
                I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have burned them in the past.  I have been in the medical billing field for over 13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company.  I have no client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when it's time.  I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group.  I have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for providers.  My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who gets the short end of the stick much to often.  I have confidence, I am a CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure they have defense at the front door (Office Managers). 
                Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                 Terry J. Pierce, CPC



                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Lin <italiandoll1967@...>
                To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate


                I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                billing company.

                What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                hire in-house staff.

                I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                both in-house and outsourced billing.

                Linda Walker

                Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                A division of K&L Media, LLC
                <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com]
                On Behalf Of Melinda
                Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                Diane,

                From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                in-house employee and outsourcing.

                Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                that no one can collect on them.

                There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                are embezeling.

                Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                Melinda Brown, CMBS
                Ins Biller

                --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                own
                > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                to start
                > out.
                > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                productive
                > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                school was
                > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                for those
                > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                just an
                > advertising tactic for the school.
                >
                > -------Original Message----- --
                >
                > From: Lin
                > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                >
                > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                working from
                > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                house
                > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                offices
                > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                from home
                > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                >
                > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                risks to
                > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                want to
                > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Linda Walker
                >
                > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                > <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                >
                > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                >
                >
                >
                > Hi,
                > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                work from
                > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                business
                > cards, etc).
                > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                worth
                > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                local
                > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                what to
                > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                > Thanks,
                > Diane
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                Be a better friend, newshound, and
                know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lin
                Terry, Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I won t sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                  Terry,

                  Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I
                  won't sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                  first souly to go over all the things that were going wrong or had went
                  wrong, I basically allowed them a complete bitch session (pardon my French)
                  and I just listened. I would then take all of their problems and find
                  solutions and present those solutions to them. I didn't get every client I
                  set out to get that had been previously burned, some of them turned their
                  situations around "in-house" and really were doing quite well.

                  There of course were those that were a bit tougher to get because like
                  anything there are always 2 sides to every story, I obtained one psychiatric
                  practice that claimed to have had many problems with their billing company
                  they fired and wanted me to start right away, foolishly I did and I realized
                  this billing company before me did a good job, it was the providers in the
                  practice that wanted things their way and the billing company they had
                  before me was not having any of that (Fraud with a capital "F")

                  So some of the horror stories we hear about billing companies from providers
                  are really not always what they appear to be.



                  A practice that has truly been burnt by a billing company is not impossible
                  to win over, but I think the key is to really listen to their complaints and
                  then find ways in which you could do it better. As a small example, a
                  billing company might not have been verifying benefits and/or eligibility
                  for a mental health practice when really that is the first and most
                  important step in the reimbursement process. Sure I have had clients who
                  wanted to do their own but it always ended up to be a lesson learned on
                  their end. Maybe the billing company was not using a software that offered
                  remote access and the doctor felt he had no control, offer up the best means
                  to your clients by having remote access, perhaps the practice felt they were
                  not receiving reports as often as they wanted, you could offer reporting
                  bi-weekly rather than monthly. There are many things a good billing company
                  can do to turn around the experience of a practice that was burnt in the
                  past. There was someone on here that just recently said the main goal of a
                  medical biller was to process claims using superbills.. make sure you don't
                  think this way and make sure your providers don't think you think this way!!





                  Linda Walker

                  Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                  <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
                  A division of K&L Media, LLC
                  <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

                  Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry





                  From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
                  On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                  Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:25 AM
                  To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate



                  Hi Linda,
                  I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey
                  to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have
                  burned them in the past. I have been in the medical billing field for over
                  13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company. I have no
                  client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when
                  it's time. I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group. I
                  have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for
                  providers. My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who
                  gets the short end of the stick much to often. I have confidence, I am a
                  CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do
                  worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the
                  past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure
                  they have defense at the front door (Office Managers).
                  Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                  Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Lin <italiandoll1967@... <mailto:italiandoll1967%40yahoo.com> >
                  To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>

                  Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                  Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                  I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                  billing company.

                  What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                  control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                  billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                  strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                  the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                  control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                  income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                  have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                  medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                  getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                  to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                  doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                  hire in-house staff.

                  I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                  practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                  staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                  staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                  both in-house and outsourced billing.

                  Linda Walker

                  Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                  <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                  A division of K&L Media, LLC
                  <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                  Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                  From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups.
                  com]
                  On Behalf Of Melinda
                  Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                  To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                  Diane,

                  From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                  you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                  physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                  in-house employee and outsourcing.

                  Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                  in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                  afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                  though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                  bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                  then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                  adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                  with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                  One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                  billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                  essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                  that no one can collect on them.

                  There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                  billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                  or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                  home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                  good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                  burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                  sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                  agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                  are embezeling.

                  Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                  Melinda Brown, CMBS
                  Ins Biller

                  --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                  <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                  <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                  own
                  > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                  to start
                  > out.
                  > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                  productive
                  > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                  school was
                  > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                  for those
                  > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                  just an
                  > advertising tactic for the school.
                  >
                  > -------Original Message----- --
                  >
                  > From: Lin
                  > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                  > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                  <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                  > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                  >
                  > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                  working from
                  > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                  house
                  > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                  offices
                  > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                  from home
                  > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                  >
                  > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                  risks to
                  > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                  want to
                  > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Linda Walker
                  >
                  > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                  > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                  > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                  > <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                  >
                  > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                  <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                  [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                  <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                  > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                  > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                  > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                  <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                  > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi,
                  > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                  work from
                  > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                  business
                  > cards, etc).
                  > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                  worth
                  > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                  local
                  > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                  > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                  what to
                  > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                  > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                  > Thanks,
                  > Diane
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  __________________________________________________________
                  Be a better friend, newshound, and
                  know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                  http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Terry Pierce
                  Hi Linda, Thanks for the advise, and no way about the super bills!  That s what I mean, DUH, ofcourse it is more than just super bills, it s about all of it,
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                    Hi Linda,
                    Thanks for the advise, and no way about the super bills!  That's what I mean, DUH, ofcourse it is more than just super bills, it's about all of it, from the front desk, to what gets to you, to what the doctors are billing, to A/R which is where most is lost anyway.  That is what frustrates me so much, is that people think it is just data entry!  It's not, and that is what I think gives the billing companies a bad name. 
                    I feel you need to be able to educate the doctors as to what is billiable services, what's included services and so forth.  I believe as you said meeting with them bi-weekly and letting them have access to see there account and let them know whats going on. 
                    They need to be re-assured that they have control, and that we as a company have there best interest at heart, I mean after all we get paid based on how well we perform for them. 
                    So again, thanks for your input, I appreicate it, I will let you know when I get my first meeting!!
                      
                    Terry J. Pierce, CPC



                    ----- Original Message ----
                    From: Lin <italiandoll1967@...>
                    To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:43:24 AM
                    Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate


                    Terry,

                    Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I
                    won't sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                    first souly to go over all the things that were going wrong or had went
                    wrong, I basically allowed them a complete bitch session (pardon my French)
                    and I just listened. I would then take all of their problems and find
                    solutions and present those solutions to them. I didn't get every client I
                    set out to get that had been previously burned, some of them turned their
                    situations around "in-house" and really were doing quite well.

                    There of course were those that were a bit tougher to get because like
                    anything there are always 2 sides to every story, I obtained one psychiatric
                    practice that claimed to have had many problems with their billing company
                    they fired and wanted me to start right away, foolishly I did and I realized
                    this billing company before me did a good job, it was the providers in the
                    practice that wanted things their way and the billing company they had
                    before me was not having any of that (Fraud with a capital "F")

                    So some of the horror stories we hear about billing companies from providers
                    are really not always what they appear to be.

                    A practice that has truly been burnt by a billing company is not impossible
                    to win over, but I think the key is to really listen to their complaints and
                    then find ways in which you could do it better. As a small example, a
                    billing company might not have been verifying benefits and/or eligibility
                    for a mental health practice when really that is the first and most
                    important step in the reimbursement process. Sure I have had clients who
                    wanted to do their own but it always ended up to be a lesson learned on
                    their end. Maybe the billing company was not using a software that offered
                    remote access and the doctor felt he had no control, offer up the best means
                    to your clients by having remote access, perhaps the practice felt they were
                    not receiving reports as often as they wanted, you could offer reporting
                    bi-weekly rather than monthly. There are many things a good billing company
                    can do to turn around the experience of a practice that was burnt in the
                    past. There was someone on here that just recently said the main goal of a
                    medical biller was to process claims using superbills.. make sure you don't
                    think this way and make sure your providers don't think you think this way!!

                    Linda Walker

                    Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                    <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                    A division of K&L Media, LLC
                    <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                    Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                    From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com]
                    On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                    Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:25 AM
                    To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                    Hi Linda,
                    I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey
                    to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have
                    burned them in the past. I have been in the medical billing field for over
                    13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company. I have no
                    client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when
                    it's time. I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group. I
                    have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for
                    providers. My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who
                    gets the short end of the stick much to often. I have confidence, I am a
                    CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do
                    worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the
                    past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure
                    they have defense at the front door (Office Managers)..
                    Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                    Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                    ----- Original Message ----
                    From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com> >
                    To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>

                    Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                    Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                    I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                    billing company.

                    What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                    control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                    billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                    strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                    the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                    control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                    income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                    have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                    medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                    getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                    to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                    doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                    hire in-house staff.

                    I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                    practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                    staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                    staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                    both in-house and outsourced billing.

                    Linda Walker

                    Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                    <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                    A division of K&L Media, LLC
                    <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                    Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                    From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                    com]
                    On Behalf Of Melinda
                    Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                    To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                    Diane,

                    From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                    you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                    physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                    in-house employee and outsourcing.

                    Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                    in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                    afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                    though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                    bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                    then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                    adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                    with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                    One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                    billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                    essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                    that no one can collect on them.

                    There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                    billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                    or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                    home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                    good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                    burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                    sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                    agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                    are embezeling.

                    Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                    Melinda Brown, CMBS
                    Ins Biller

                    --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                    <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                    <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                    own
                    > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                    to start
                    > out.
                    > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                    productive
                    > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                    school was
                    > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                    for those
                    > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                    just an
                    > advertising tactic for the school.
                    >
                    > -------Original Message----- --
                    >
                    > From: Lin
                    > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                    > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                    <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                    > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                    >
                    > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                    working from
                    > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                    house
                    > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                    offices
                    > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                    from home
                    > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                    >
                    > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                    risks to
                    > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                    want to
                    > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Linda Walker
                    >
                    > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                    > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                    > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                    > <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                    >
                    > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                    <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                    [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups. com
                    <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                    > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                    > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                    > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                    <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                    > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi,
                    > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                    work from
                    > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                    business
                    > cards, etc).
                    > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                    worth
                    > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                    local
                    > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                    > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                    what to
                    > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                    > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                    > Thanks,
                    > Diane
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                    Be a better friend, newshound, and
                    know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                    http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    ____________________________________________________________________________________
                    Be a better friend, newshound, and
                    know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Lin
                    Terry, One other thing. I wouldn t recommend billers do any coding from home because of the need to have the medical record present, however you could offer a
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                      Terry,

                      One other thing. I wouldn't recommend billers do any coding from home
                      because of the need to have the medical record present, however you could
                      offer a once per week in house visit for any coding problems, you would be
                      surprised how many billers get their foot in the door this way. Maybe a post
                      card mailing with that as a special service, even if they have in-house
                      billing staff or they outsource, you have chance to make the connection,
                      make money and prove yourself. The CPC is a very valuable asset! The same
                      goes for transcription!





                      Linda Walker

                      Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                      <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
                      A division of K&L Media, LLC
                      <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

                      Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry







                      From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
                      On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                      Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:05 AM
                      To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate



                      Hi Linda,
                      Thanks for the advise, and no way about the super bills! That's what I
                      mean, DUH, ofcourse it is more than just super bills, it's about all of it,
                      from the front desk, to what gets to you, to what the doctors are billing,
                      to A/R which is where most is lost anyway. That is what frustrates me so
                      much, is that people think it is just data entry! It's not, and that is
                      what I think gives the billing companies a bad name.
                      I feel you need to be able to educate the doctors as to what is billiable
                      services, what's included services and so forth. I believe as you said
                      meeting with them bi-weekly and letting them have access to see there
                      account and let them know whats going on.
                      They need to be re-assured that they have control, and that we as a company
                      have there best interest at heart, I mean after all we get paid based on how
                      well we perform for them.
                      So again, thanks for your input, I appreicate it, I will let you know when I
                      get my first meeting!!

                      Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Lin <italiandoll1967@... <mailto:italiandoll1967%40yahoo.com> >
                      To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>

                      Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:43:24 AM
                      Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                      Terry,

                      Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I
                      won't sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                      first souly to go over all the things that were going wrong or had went
                      wrong, I basically allowed them a complete bitch session (pardon my French)
                      and I just listened. I would then take all of their problems and find
                      solutions and present those solutions to them. I didn't get every client I
                      set out to get that had been previously burned, some of them turned their
                      situations around "in-house" and really were doing quite well.

                      There of course were those that were a bit tougher to get because like
                      anything there are always 2 sides to every story, I obtained one psychiatric
                      practice that claimed to have had many problems with their billing company
                      they fired and wanted me to start right away, foolishly I did and I realized
                      this billing company before me did a good job, it was the providers in the
                      practice that wanted things their way and the billing company they had
                      before me was not having any of that (Fraud with a capital "F")

                      So some of the horror stories we hear about billing companies from providers
                      are really not always what they appear to be.

                      A practice that has truly been burnt by a billing company is not impossible
                      to win over, but I think the key is to really listen to their complaints and
                      then find ways in which you could do it better. As a small example, a
                      billing company might not have been verifying benefits and/or eligibility
                      for a mental health practice when really that is the first and most
                      important step in the reimbursement process. Sure I have had clients who
                      wanted to do their own but it always ended up to be a lesson learned on
                      their end. Maybe the billing company was not using a software that offered
                      remote access and the doctor felt he had no control, offer up the best means
                      to your clients by having remote access, perhaps the practice felt they were
                      not receiving reports as often as they wanted, you could offer reporting
                      bi-weekly rather than monthly. There are many things a good billing company
                      can do to turn around the experience of a practice that was burnt in the
                      past. There was someone on here that just recently said the main goal of a
                      medical biller was to process claims using superbills.. make sure you don't
                      think this way and make sure your providers don't think you think this way!!

                      Linda Walker

                      Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                      <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                      A division of K&L Media, LLC
                      <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                      Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                      From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups.
                      com]
                      On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                      Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:25 AM
                      To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                      Hi Linda,
                      I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey
                      to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have
                      burned them in the past. I have been in the medical billing field for over
                      13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company. I have no
                      client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when
                      it's time. I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group. I
                      have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for
                      providers. My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who
                      gets the short end of the stick much to often. I have confidence, I am a
                      CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do
                      worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the
                      past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure
                      they have defense at the front door (Office Managers)..
                      Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                      Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com>
                      >
                      To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup
                      s.com>

                      Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                      Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                      I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                      billing company.

                      What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                      control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                      billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                      strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                      the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                      control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                      income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                      have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                      medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                      getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                      to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                      doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                      hire in-house staff.

                      I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                      practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                      staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                      staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                      both in-house and outsourced billing.

                      Linda Walker

                      Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                      <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                      A division of K&L Media, LLC
                      <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                      Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                      From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                      com]
                      On Behalf Of Melinda
                      Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                      To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                      Diane,

                      From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                      you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                      physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                      in-house employee and outsourcing.

                      Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                      in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                      afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                      though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                      bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                      then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                      adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                      with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                      One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                      billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                      essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                      that no one can collect on them.

                      There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                      billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                      or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                      home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                      good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                      burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                      sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                      agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                      are embezeling.

                      Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                      Melinda Brown, CMBS
                      Ins Biller

                      --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                      <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                      <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                      own
                      > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                      to start
                      > out.
                      > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                      productive
                      > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                      school was
                      > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                      for those
                      > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                      just an
                      > advertising tactic for the school.
                      >
                      > -------Original Message----- --
                      >
                      > From: Lin
                      > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                      > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                      <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                      > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                      >
                      > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                      working from
                      > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                      house
                      > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                      offices
                      > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                      from home
                      > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                      >
                      > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                      risks to
                      > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                      want to
                      > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Linda Walker
                      >
                      > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                      > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                      > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                      > <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                      >
                      > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                      <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                      [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups. com
                      <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                      > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                      > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                      > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                      <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                      > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Hi,
                      > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                      work from
                      > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                      business
                      > cards, etc).
                      > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                      worth
                      > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                      local
                      > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                      > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                      what to
                      > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                      > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                      > Thanks,
                      > Diane
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                      Be a better friend, newshound, and
                      know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                      http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      __________________________________________________________
                      Be a better friend, newshound, and
                      know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                      http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Terry Pierce
                      Linda, I am currently developing a mailer, that offers a free no obl, A/R anaylsis as well as coding benefits, and front office education, hopefully this well
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                        Linda,
                        I am currently developing a mailer, that offers a free no obl, A/R anaylsis as well as coding benefits, and front office education, hopefully this well enable me to get my foot in the door, especially the a/r analysis, becuase you know as well as I do there is always money out there that can be recoverd.  The trick is for it not to end up in the trash!  I thought I would go door to door, I have a great packet of info, and would be bringing treats for the front office, in hopes to get a phone call for a meeting.  What do you think?
                         Terry J. Pierce, CPC



                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: Lin <italiandoll1967@...>
                        To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:41:25 AM
                        Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate


                        Terry,

                        One other thing. I wouldn't recommend billers do any coding from home
                        because of the need to have the medical record present, however you could
                        offer a once per week in house visit for any coding problems, you would be
                        surprised how many billers get their foot in the door this way. Maybe a post
                        card mailing with that as a special service, even if they have in-house
                        billing staff or they outsource, you have chance to make the connection,
                        make money and prove yourself. The CPC is a very valuable asset! The same
                        goes for transcription!

                        Linda Walker

                        Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                        <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                        A division of K&L Media, LLC
                        <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                        Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                        From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com]
                        On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                        Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:05 AM
                        To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                        Hi Linda,
                        Thanks for the advise, and no way about the super bills! That's what I
                        mean, DUH, ofcourse it is more than just super bills, it's about all of it,
                        from the front desk, to what gets to you, to what the doctors are billing,
                        to A/R which is where most is lost anyway. That is what frustrates me so
                        much, is that people think it is just data entry! It's not, and that is
                        what I think gives the billing companies a bad name.
                        I feel you need to be able to educate the doctors as to what is billiable
                        services, what's included services and so forth. I believe as you said
                        meeting with them bi-weekly and letting them have access to see there
                        account and let them know whats going on.
                        They need to be re-assured that they have control, and that we as a company
                        have there best interest at heart, I mean after all we get paid based on how
                        well we perform for them.
                        So again, thanks for your input, I appreicate it, I will let you know when I
                        get my first meeting!!

                        Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com> >
                        To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>

                        Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:43:24 AM
                        Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                        Terry,

                        Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I
                        won't sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                        first souly to go over all the things that were going wrong or had went
                        wrong, I basically allowed them a complete bitch session (pardon my French)
                        and I just listened. I would then take all of their problems and find
                        solutions and present those solutions to them. I didn't get every client I
                        set out to get that had been previously burned, some of them turned their
                        situations around "in-house" and really were doing quite well.

                        There of course were those that were a bit tougher to get because like
                        anything there are always 2 sides to every story, I obtained one psychiatric
                        practice that claimed to have had many problems with their billing company
                        they fired and wanted me to start right away, foolishly I did and I realized
                        this billing company before me did a good job, it was the providers in the
                        practice that wanted things their way and the billing company they had
                        before me was not having any of that (Fraud with a capital "F")

                        So some of the horror stories we hear about billing companies from providers
                        are really not always what they appear to be.

                        A practice that has truly been burnt by a billing company is not impossible
                        to win over, but I think the key is to really listen to their complaints and
                        then find ways in which you could do it better. As a small example, a
                        billing company might not have been verifying benefits and/or eligibility
                        for a mental health practice when really that is the first and most
                        important step in the reimbursement process. Sure I have had clients who
                        wanted to do their own but it always ended up to be a lesson learned on
                        their end. Maybe the billing company was not using a software that offered
                        remote access and the doctor felt he had no control, offer up the best means
                        to your clients by having remote access, perhaps the practice felt they were
                        not receiving reports as often as they wanted, you could offer reporting
                        bi-weekly rather than monthly. There are many things a good billing company
                        can do to turn around the experience of a practice that was burnt in the
                        past. There was someone on here that just recently said the main goal of a
                        medical biller was to process claims using superbills.. make sure you don't
                        think this way and make sure your providers don't think you think this way!!

                        Linda Walker

                        Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                        <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                        A division of K&L Media, LLC
                        <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                        Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                        From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                        com]
                        On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                        Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:25 AM
                        To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                        Hi Linda,
                        I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey
                        to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have
                        burned them in the past. I have been in the medical billing field for over
                        13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company. I have no
                        client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when
                        it's time. I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group. I
                        have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for
                        providers. My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who
                        gets the short end of the stick much to often. I have confidence, I am a
                        CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do
                        worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the
                        past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure
                        they have defense at the front door (Office Managers)..
                        Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                        Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com>
                        >
                        To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup
                        s.com>

                        Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                        Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                        I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                        billing company.

                        What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                        control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                        billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                        strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                        the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                        control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                        income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                        have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                        medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                        getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                        to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                        doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                        hire in-house staff.

                        I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                        practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                        staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                        staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                        both in-house and outsourced billing.

                        Linda Walker

                        Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                        <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                        A division of K&L Media, LLC
                        <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                        Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                        From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                        com]
                        On Behalf Of Melinda
                        Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                        To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                        Diane,

                        From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                        you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                        physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                        in-house employee and outsourcing.

                        Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                        in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                        afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                        though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                        bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                        then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                        adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                        with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                        One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                        billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                        essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                        that no one can collect on them.

                        There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                        billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                        or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                        home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                        good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                        burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                        sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                        agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                        are embezeling.

                        Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                        Melinda Brown, CMBS
                        Ins Biller

                        --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                        <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                        own
                        > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                        to start
                        > out.
                        > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                        productive
                        > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                        school was
                        > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                        for those
                        > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                        just an
                        > advertising tactic for the school.
                        >
                        > -------Original Message----- --
                        >
                        > From: Lin
                        > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                        > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                        > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                        >
                        > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                        working from
                        > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                        house
                        > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                        offices
                        > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                        from home
                        > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                        >
                        > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                        risks to
                        > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                        want to
                        > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Linda Walker
                        >
                        > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                        > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                        > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                        > <http://www..klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                        >
                        > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                        [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups. com
                        <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                        > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                        > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                        > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                        <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                        > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                        work from
                        > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                        business
                        > cards, etc).
                        > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                        worth
                        > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                        local
                        > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                        > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                        what to
                        > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                        > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                        > Thanks,
                        > Diane
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                        Be a better friend, newshound, and
                        know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                        http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                        Be a better friend, newshound, and
                        know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                        http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                        ____________________________________________________________________________________
                        Be a better friend, newshound, and
                        know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Lin
                        Great idea, you want to sort of play up the fact that you will do certain tasks for them in house Right now with HIPAA at it s highest peak doctors are very
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                          Great idea, you want to sort of play up the fact that you will do certain
                          tasks for them "in house" Right now with HIPAA at it's highest peak doctors
                          are very skittish, you want to assure them their records won't leave the
                          office, you can make that a benefit in your mailings.





                          Linda Walker

                          Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                          <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
                          A division of K&L Media, LLC
                          <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com

                          Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry







                          From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
                          On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 10:12 AM
                          To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate



                          Linda,
                          I am currently developing a mailer, that offers a free no obl, A/R anaylsis
                          as well as coding benefits, and front office education, hopefully this well
                          enable me to get my foot in the door, especially the a/r analysis, becuase
                          you know as well as I do there is always money out there that can be
                          recoverd. The trick is for it not to end up in the trash! I thought I
                          would go door to door, I have a great packet of info, and would be bringing
                          treats for the front office, in hopes to get a phone call for a meeting.
                          What do you think?
                          Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Lin <italiandoll1967@... <mailto:italiandoll1967%40yahoo.com> >
                          To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>

                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:41:25 AM
                          Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                          Terry,

                          One other thing. I wouldn't recommend billers do any coding from home
                          because of the need to have the medical record present, however you could
                          offer a once per week in house visit for any coding problems, you would be
                          surprised how many billers get their foot in the door this way. Maybe a post
                          card mailing with that as a special service, even if they have in-house
                          billing staff or they outsource, you have chance to make the connection,
                          make money and prove yourself. The CPC is a very valuable asset! The same
                          goes for transcription!

                          Linda Walker

                          Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                          <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                          A division of K&L Media, LLC
                          <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                          Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                          From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups.
                          com]
                          On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:05 AM
                          To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                          Hi Linda,
                          Thanks for the advise, and no way about the super bills! That's what I
                          mean, DUH, ofcourse it is more than just super bills, it's about all of it,
                          from the front desk, to what gets to you, to what the doctors are billing,
                          to A/R which is where most is lost anyway. That is what frustrates me so
                          much, is that people think it is just data entry! It's not, and that is
                          what I think gives the billing companies a bad name.
                          I feel you need to be able to educate the doctors as to what is billiable
                          services, what's included services and so forth. I believe as you said
                          meeting with them bi-weekly and letting them have access to see there
                          account and let them know whats going on.
                          They need to be re-assured that they have control, and that we as a company
                          have there best interest at heart, I mean after all we get paid based on how
                          well we perform for them.
                          So again, thanks for your input, I appreicate it, I will let you know when I
                          get my first meeting!!

                          Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com>
                          >
                          To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup
                          s.com>

                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:43:24 AM
                          Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                          Terry,

                          Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I
                          won't sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                          first souly to go over all the things that were going wrong or had went
                          wrong, I basically allowed them a complete bitch session (pardon my French)
                          and I just listened. I would then take all of their problems and find
                          solutions and present those solutions to them. I didn't get every client I
                          set out to get that had been previously burned, some of them turned their
                          situations around "in-house" and really were doing quite well.

                          There of course were those that were a bit tougher to get because like
                          anything there are always 2 sides to every story, I obtained one psychiatric
                          practice that claimed to have had many problems with their billing company
                          they fired and wanted me to start right away, foolishly I did and I realized
                          this billing company before me did a good job, it was the providers in the
                          practice that wanted things their way and the billing company they had
                          before me was not having any of that (Fraud with a capital "F")

                          So some of the horror stories we hear about billing companies from providers
                          are really not always what they appear to be.

                          A practice that has truly been burnt by a billing company is not impossible
                          to win over, but I think the key is to really listen to their complaints and
                          then find ways in which you could do it better. As a small example, a
                          billing company might not have been verifying benefits and/or eligibility
                          for a mental health practice when really that is the first and most
                          important step in the reimbursement process. Sure I have had clients who
                          wanted to do their own but it always ended up to be a lesson learned on
                          their end. Maybe the billing company was not using a software that offered
                          remote access and the doctor felt he had no control, offer up the best means
                          to your clients by having remote access, perhaps the practice felt they were
                          not receiving reports as often as they wanted, you could offer reporting
                          bi-weekly rather than monthly. There are many things a good billing company
                          can do to turn around the experience of a practice that was burnt in the
                          past. There was someone on here that just recently said the main goal of a
                          medical biller was to process claims using superbills.. make sure you don't
                          think this way and make sure your providers don't think you think this way!!

                          Linda Walker

                          Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                          <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                          A division of K&L Media, LLC
                          <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                          Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                          From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                          com]
                          On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:25 AM
                          To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                          Hi Linda,
                          I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey
                          to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have
                          burned them in the past. I have been in the medical billing field for over
                          13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company. I have no
                          client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when
                          it's time. I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group. I
                          have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for
                          providers. My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who
                          gets the short end of the stick much to often. I have confidence, I am a
                          CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do
                          worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the
                          past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure
                          they have defense at the front door (Office Managers)..
                          Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                          Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com>
                          >
                          To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup
                          s.com>

                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                          Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                          I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                          billing company.

                          What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                          control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                          billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                          strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                          the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                          control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                          income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                          have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                          medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                          getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                          to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                          doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                          hire in-house staff.

                          I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                          practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                          staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                          staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                          both in-house and outsourced billing.

                          Linda Walker

                          Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                          <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                          A division of K&L Media, LLC
                          <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                          Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                          From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                          com]
                          On Behalf Of Melinda
                          Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                          To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                          Diane,

                          From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                          you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                          physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                          in-house employee and outsourcing.

                          Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                          in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                          afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                          though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                          bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                          then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                          adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                          with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                          One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                          billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                          essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                          that no one can collect on them.

                          There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                          billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                          or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                          home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                          good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                          burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                          sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                          agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                          are embezeling.

                          Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                          Melinda Brown, CMBS
                          Ins Biller

                          --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                          <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                          own
                          > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                          to start
                          > out.
                          > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                          productive
                          > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                          school was
                          > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                          for those
                          > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                          just an
                          > advertising tactic for the school.
                          >
                          > -------Original Message----- --
                          >
                          > From: Lin
                          > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                          > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                          > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                          >
                          > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                          working from
                          > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                          house
                          > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                          offices
                          > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                          from home
                          > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                          >
                          > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                          risks to
                          > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                          want to
                          > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Linda Walker
                          >
                          > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                          > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                          > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                          > <http://www..klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                          >
                          > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                          [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups. com
                          <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                          > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                          > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                          > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                          <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                          > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Hi,
                          > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                          work from
                          > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                          business
                          > cards, etc).
                          > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                          worth
                          > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                          local
                          > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                          > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                          what to
                          > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                          > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                          > Thanks,
                          > Diane
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                          Be a better friend, newshound, and
                          know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                          http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                          Be a better friend, newshound, and
                          know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                          http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          __________________________________________________________
                          Be a better friend, newshound, and
                          know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                          http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Terry Pierce
                          Thanks Linda for all your information, I will put it to good use!  Terry J. Pierce, CPC ... From: Lin To:
                          Message 12 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                            Thanks Linda for all your information, I will put it to good use!

                             Terry J. Pierce, CPC



                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Lin <italiandoll1967@...>
                            To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 10:14:35 AM
                            Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate


                            Great idea, you want to sort of play up the fact that you will do certain
                            tasks for them "in house" Right now with HIPAA at it's highest peak doctors
                            are very skittish, you want to assure them their records won't leave the
                            office, you can make that a benefit in your mailings.

                            Linda Walker

                            Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                            <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                            A division of K&L Media, LLC
                            <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                            Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                            From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com]
                            On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 10:12 AM
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            Linda,
                            I am currently developing a mailer, that offers a free no obl, A/R anaylsis
                            as well as coding benefits, and front office education, hopefully this well
                            enable me to get my foot in the door, especially the a/r analysis, becuase
                            you know as well as I do there is always money out there that can be
                            recoverd. The trick is for it not to end up in the trash! I thought I
                            would go door to door, I have a great packet of info, and would be bringing
                            treats for the front office, in hopes to get a phone call for a meeting.
                            What do you think?
                            Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com> >
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>

                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:41:25 AM
                            Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            Terry,

                            One other thing. I wouldn't recommend billers do any coding from home
                            because of the need to have the medical record present, however you could
                            offer a once per week in house visit for any coding problems, you would be
                            surprised how many billers get their foot in the door this way. Maybe a post
                            card mailing with that as a special service, even if they have in-house
                            billing staff or they outsource, you have chance to make the connection,
                            make money and prove yourself. The CPC is a very valuable asset! The same
                            goes for transcription!

                            Linda Walker

                            Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                            <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                            A division of K&L Media, LLC
                            <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                            Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                            From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                            com]
                            On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 9:05 AM
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            Hi Linda,
                            Thanks for the advise, and no way about the super bills! That's what I
                            mean, DUH, ofcourse it is more than just super bills, it's about all of it,
                            from the front desk, to what gets to you, to what the doctors are billing,
                            to A/R which is where most is lost anyway. That is what frustrates me so
                            much, is that people think it is just data entry! It's not, and that is
                            what I think gives the billing companies a bad name.
                            I feel you need to be able to educate the doctors as to what is billiable
                            services, what's included services and so forth. I believe as you said
                            meeting with them bi-weekly and letting them have access to see there
                            account and let them know whats going on.
                            They need to be re-assured that they have control, and that we as a company
                            have there best interest at heart, I mean after all we get paid based on how
                            well we perform for them.
                            So again, thanks for your input, I appreicate it, I will let you know when I
                            get my first meeting!!

                            Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com>
                            >
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup
                            s.com>

                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:43:24 AM
                            Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            Terry,

                            Those that were burnt in the past were a bit trickier to get on board, I
                            won't sugar coat that and say it was easy. What I would do is meet with them
                            first souly to go over all the things that were going wrong or had went
                            wrong, I basically allowed them a complete bitch session (pardon my French)
                            and I just listened. I would then take all of their problems and find
                            solutions and present those solutions to them. I didn't get every client I
                            set out to get that had been previously burned, some of them turned their
                            situations around "in-house" and really were doing quite well.

                            There of course were those that were a bit tougher to get because like
                            anything there are always 2 sides to every story, I obtained one psychiatric
                            practice that claimed to have had many problems with their billing company
                            they fired and wanted me to start right away, foolishly I did and I realized
                            this billing company before me did a good job, it was the providers in the
                            practice that wanted things their way and the billing company they had
                            before me was not having any of that (Fraud with a capital "F")

                            So some of the horror stories we hear about billing companies from providers
                            are really not always what they appear to be.

                            A practice that has truly been burnt by a billing company is not impossible
                            to win over, but I think the key is to really listen to their complaints and
                            then find ways in which you could do it better. As a small example, a
                            billing company might not have been verifying benefits and/or eligibility
                            for a mental health practice when really that is the first and most
                            important step in the reimbursement process. Sure I have had clients who
                            wanted to do their own but it always ended up to be a lesson learned on
                            their end. Maybe the billing company was not using a software that offered
                            remote access and the doctor felt he had no control, offer up the best means
                            to your clients by having remote access, perhaps the practice felt they were
                            not receiving reports as often as they wanted, you could offer reporting
                            bi-weekly rather than monthly. There are many things a good billing company
                            can do to turn around the experience of a practice that was burnt in the
                            past. There was someone on here that just recently said the main goal of a
                            medical biller was to process claims using superbills.. make sure you don't
                            think this way and make sure your providers don't think you think this way!!

                            Linda Walker

                            Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                            <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                            A division of K&L Media, LLC
                            <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                            Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                            From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                            com]
                            On Behalf Of Terry Pierce
                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:25 AM
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            Hi Linda,
                            I have been reading the email exchanges, and I have to ask how do you convey
                            to the provider that you are not like the other billing companies that have
                            burned them in the past. I have been in the medical billing field for over
                            13 years, and I have started my own medical billing company. I have no
                            client yet, but I am not worried, I know the right one will come along when
                            it's time. I am currently a billing manager for a large Ortho group. I
                            have worked all sides from insurance, to billing companies, and for
                            providers. My heart is for the provider, as they seem to be the one who
                            gets the short end of the stick much to often. I have confidence, I am a
                            CPC, and I have the knowledge to back up what I am talking about, but I do
                            worry about the best way to handle a provider who has been burned in the
                            past, let alone even getting a chance to talk to the provider, as I am sure
                            they have defense at the front door (Office Managers)..
                            Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
                            Terry J. Pierce, CPC

                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Lin <italiandoll1967@ yahoo.com <mailto:italiandoll 1967%40yahoo. com>
                            >
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup
                            s.com>

                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 8:14:09 AM
                            Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later started my own
                            billing company.

                            What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to lose
                            control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The medical
                            billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however the
                            strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP model's where
                            the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does not lose
                            control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary source of
                            income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I couldn't
                            have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The right
                            medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no problem
                            getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible for them
                            to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still many
                            doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that will
                            hire in-house staff.

                            I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing were
                            practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had billing
                            staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones where the
                            staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and con's to
                            both in-house and outsourced billing.

                            Linda Walker

                            Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                            <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                            A division of K&L Media, LLC
                            <http://www.klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com

                            Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry

                            From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups.
                            com]
                            On Behalf Of Melinda
                            Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                            To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate

                            Diane,

                            From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                            you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                            physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have an
                            in-house employee and outsourcing.

                            Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and now
                            in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                            afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                            though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                            bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                            then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced billers
                            adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                            with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.

                            One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                            billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                            essentially "uncollectable" ; because they are so old or so messed up
                            that no one can collect on them.

                            There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                            billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned once
                            or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                            home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there aren't
                            good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd been
                            burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if I
                            sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the billing
                            agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff that
                            are embezeling.

                            Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.

                            Melinda Brown, CMBS
                            Ins Biller

                            --- In MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                            <DSMDesignz@ ...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have my
                            own
                            > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an office
                            to start
                            > out.
                            > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                            productive
                            > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                            school was
                            > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc look
                            for those
                            > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that was
                            just an
                            > advertising tactic for the school.
                            >
                            > -------Original Message----- --
                            >
                            > From: Lin
                            > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                            > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                            > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                            >
                            > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                            working from
                            > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                            house
                            > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                            offices
                            > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                            from home
                            > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                            >
                            > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                            risks to
                            > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they might
                            want to
                            > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Linda Walker
                            >
                            > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                            > <http://www.billersw ebsite.com> http://www.billersw ebsite.com
                            > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                            > <http://www.. klmedial lc.com> http://www.klmedial lc.com
                            >
                            > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > From: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                            [mailto:MedicalBill ers@ yahoogroups. com
                            <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com> ]
                            > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                            > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                            > To: MedicalBillers@ yahoogroups. com
                            <mailto:MedicalBill ers%40yahoogroup s.com>
                            > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Hi,
                            > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                            work from
                            > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                            business
                            > cards, etc).
                            > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if it's
                            worth
                            > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to our
                            local
                            > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                            > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss as
                            what to
                            > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and would
                            > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                            > Thanks,
                            > Diane
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
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                            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
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                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
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                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                            Be a better friend, newshound, and
                            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                            http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR 8HDtDypao8Wcj9tA cJ

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                            ____________________________________________________________________________________
                            Be a better friend, newshound, and
                            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Melinda
                            Well said Lin! Melinda ... started my own ... lose ... medical ... the ... model s where ... not lose ... source of ... couldn t ... right ... problem ... for
                            Message 13 of 15 , Apr 28, 2008
                              Well said Lin!

                              Melinda

                              --- In MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com, "Lin" <italiandoll1967@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > I started out in the industry as a claims examiner and later
                              started my own
                              > billing company.
                              >
                              > What Melinda says is true, a lot of doctors either don't' want to
                              lose
                              > control over their billing or they have been burnt in the past. The
                              medical
                              > billing industry on an outsourced level is very saturated, however
                              the
                              > strong do survive and survive quite well. Today there are ASP
                              model's where
                              > the billing company can do their thing and the doctor's office does
                              not lose
                              > control, there is also consulting which is mainly my secondary
                              source of
                              > income today and in fact I make more money than I did billing but I
                              couldn't
                              > have just walked into consulting I had to work my way there. The
                              right
                              > medical billing company with the right knowledge will have no
                              problem
                              > getting clients, doctors want to save money and it's VERY feasible
                              for them
                              > to do this by outsourcing, that's just a fact and there are still
                              many
                              > doctors out there that will outsource just like there are many that
                              will
                              > hire in-house staff.
                              >
                              > I would say about a third of the clients I obtained when billing
                              were
                              > practices who were burnt by another billing company, the rest had
                              billing
                              > staff that were making a real mess out of things and even ones
                              where the
                              > staff were stealing from them. So you can see there are pro's and
                              con's to
                              > both in-house and outsourced billing.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Linda Walker
                              >
                              > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                              > <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
                              > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                              > <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com
                              >
                              > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com]
                              > On Behalf Of Melinda
                              > Sent: Monday, April 28, 2008 1:55 AM
                              > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > Subject: [MedicalBillers] Re: New graduate
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Diane,
                              >
                              > From what I am hearing, that is true. A lot of it is a ploy to get
                              > you to come to their school and take their courses. If I was a
                              > physician in practice, then I would HEAVILY weigh my costs to have
                              an
                              > in-house employee and outsourcing.
                              >
                              > Having worked for a hospital and 2 medical billing services, and
                              now
                              > in private practice; I would so want my billing in-house if I could
                              > afford it. One word - CONTROL. It totally depends on your physician
                              > though...some don't want the control and some just want to see the
                              > bottom line. However, as soon as they start to see that slipping,
                              > then they want answers. I've seen way too many inexperienced
                              billers
                              > adjusting off charges because they don't know how to properly deal
                              > with insurance denials or appeal a claim. This is a huge problem.
                              >
                              > One other area that's a problem is when physicians "jump ship" with
                              > billing agencies and do it so many times that the accounts are
                              > essentially "uncollectable"; because they are so old or so messed
                              up
                              > that no one can collect on them.
                              >
                              > There are many other issues why a physician would want to keep the
                              > billing in-house. And frankly, if the physician has been burned
                              once
                              > or twice...good luck with getting them to allow you to bill from
                              > home, or out of state, or overseas. I'm not saying that there
                              aren't
                              > good billers in those cases, but if it was my livlihood and I'd
                              been
                              > burned you can betcha I'm not letting it out of my sight. Sorry if
                              I
                              > sound callous, but it's what I've experienced working in the
                              billing
                              > agencies and dealing with untrusting physicians and often staff
                              that
                              > are embezeling.
                              >
                              > Hang in there! Eventually something will turn up...just keep at it.
                              >
                              > Melinda Brown, CMBS
                              > Ins Biller
                              >
                              > --- In MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com> , Diane~~DSMDesignz
                              > <DSMDesignz@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Thanks, Lin, for the response. Eventually, I would like to have
                              my
                              > own
                              > > business, but I think I would have better luck working in an
                              office
                              > to start
                              > > out.
                              > > But what you are saying about it being a bigger risk and not cost
                              > productive
                              > > for doctor's to hire someone from home is the opposite of what my
                              > school was
                              > > telling me. They basically said that doctor's, hospitals, etc
                              look
                              > for those
                              > > kinds of employees to save money in the long run. I'm sure that
                              was
                              > just an
                              > > advertising tactic for the school.
                              > >
                              > > -------Original Message-------
                              > >
                              > > From: Lin
                              > > Date: 4/26/2008 7:51:52 AM
                              > > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
                              > > Subject: RE: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                              > >
                              > > Are you looking to start your own business or be an employee
                              > working from
                              > > home, the chances are much better for you if you look for an in-
                              > house
                              > > position unless you are trying to start your own business. Most
                              > offices
                              > > outsource to another company to reduce costs, hiring an employee
                              > from home
                              > > is riskier and not cost productive for a physician.
                              > >
                              > > If you are looking to work from home with a billing company, the
                              > risks to
                              > > them are the same if not greater, with a billing company they
                              might
                              > want to
                              > > have you in-house for a while before having you work from home.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Linda Walker
                              > >
                              > > Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
                              > > <http://www.billerswebsite.com> http://www.billerswebsite.com
                              > > A division of K&L Media, LLC
                              > > <http://www.klmediallc.com> http://www.klmediallc.com
                              > >
                              > > Website Design & Management for the Medical Services Industry
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > From: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
                              > [mailto:MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com> ]
                              > > On Behalf Of Diane~~DSMDesignz
                              > > Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 11:20 PM
                              > > To: MedicalBillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:MedicalBillers%40yahoogroups.com>
                              > > Subject: [MedicalBillers] New graduate
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Hi,
                              > > I just completed my Medical Claims and Billing course. I want to
                              > work from
                              > > home and have all my materials together (intro letters, flyers,
                              > business
                              > > cards, etc).
                              > > I know I won't find a job overnight, but can anyone tell me if
                              it's
                              > worth
                              > > going this route or trying to find an office job? I applied to
                              our
                              > local
                              > > hospital for a coding position, but got turned down.
                              > > I'm confident about my coding/billing skills, but just at a loss
                              as
                              > what to
                              > > do now? I don't know anyone locally to talk to about this, and
                              would
                              > > appreciate any help anyone can give.
                              > > Thanks,
                              > > Diane
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > ------------------------------------
                              > >
                              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
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