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The right knife is key to carving like a pro

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  • Jamie Rahm
    Published Wednesday, November 22, 2000 in the Contra Costa Times The right knife is key to carving like a pro By Annette Gooch UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE The
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 4 2:55 AM
      Published Wednesday, November 22, 2000 in the Contra Costa Times

      The right knife is key to carving like a pro

      By Annette Gooch
      UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

      The thought of carving a beautifully roasted turkey into attractive,
      uniform pieces for serving has daunted more than one cook. But, with
      the proper tools and a little know-how, carving the holiday bird can
      be just another satisfying step in creating a memorable meal.

      It's best to use a very sharp knife with a long, narrow blade 8-to-10
      inches long and 1-inch wide. A good-quality, high-carbon stainless
      steel blade without a serrated edge is ideal; it holds an edge well
      and is easy to care for. Also useful are a long-pronged chef's fork
      and a carving board with a well to catch the juices.

      After removing the bird from the oven, let it stand for 15 or 20
      minutes to allow the meat to reabsorb the juices and the internal
      temperature to equalize. When it's time to carve, present the bird at
      the dining table and carve it there, or, if you're short on table
      space or confidence, carve it in the kitchen. Follow these steps:

      Remove any trussing skewers or kitchen string from the bird. Then
      pass the blade of the knife through the skin of the bird where the
      meaty part of the drumstick touches the breast. Slice through the
      skin to expose the hip joint. Using the fork to pull the thigh
      outward, insert the knife blade into the joint and sever the leg (the
      thigh with the drumstick attached) from the body. Repeat for the
      other side.

      Place the leg, skin side up, on the carving board. Insert the tip of
      the knife into the joint between the drumstick and the thigh; sever
      the drumstick from the thigh and then slice off the meat. Repeat for
      the other side.

      Turning the bird slightly onto its side, pass the knife blade through
      the wing skin to expose the shoulder joint. Cut through the joint and
      sever the wing; repeat with the other wing.

      If carving at the table, position the bird so that the neck end is
      facing you. Holding the knife parallel to the backbone, cut slices of
      breast meat about 1/4-inch thick.

      If slicing in the kitchen, insert the knife blade flat along the
      breastbone, following the contour of the bone with the blade. Remove
      the breast half in one piece; repeat for the other side. Then slice
      the breast meat 1/4-inch thick.

      If you're still nervous, practice carving roast chicken; the
      procedure for turkey is practically identical.
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