Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Meat-Lovers Digest, Vol 10, Issue 65

Expand Messages
  • meat-lovers-request@cooking-lists.com
    Send Meat-Lovers mailing list submissions to meat-lovers@cooking-lists.com To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 4, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Send Meat-Lovers mailing list submissions to
      meat-lovers@...

      To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
      http://mail.cooking-lists.com/mailman/listinfo/meat-lovers_cooking-lists.com

      or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
      meat-lovers-request@...

      You can reach the person managing the list at
      meat-lovers-owner@...

      When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
      than "Re: Contents of Meat-Lovers digest..."


      Today's Topics:

      1. Corn, tomatoes and zucchini are staples at farmers? markets
      this time of year (Jamie R)
      2. Authors explain why boutique meat is a cut above (Jamie R)
      3. Ginger-Plum-Glazed Pork Skewers (Jamie R)
      4. Fish stew perfect for summer dining (Jamie R)
      5. Make it a complete meal with kabobs (Jamie R)
      6. Shrimp salad just right for warm days (Jamie R)
      7. THEME: Quick and Easy Tacos (Jamie R)
      8. THEME: Mexican Fire Rice (Jamie R)


      ----------------------------------------------------------------------

      Message: 1
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 17:31:46 -0700
      From: Jamie R <poppianogal@...>
      To: Clipping-Cooking@...,
      Simply-Sides@..., Meat-Lovers@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] Corn, tomatoes and zucchini are staples at
      farmers? markets this time of year
      Message-ID:
      <CAAPhKEABfuXT8gW0Xk8sxvK3CMntFR+njkxkVxGBhaZHe6VObA@...>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252

      Corn, tomatoes and zucchini are staples at farmers? markets this time of year
      Preparing summer?s plenty

      By Susan M. Selasky
      McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

      Published:August 24, 2011, 12:00 AM in the Buffalo News

      Come August you can usually count on corn, tomatoes and zucchini being
      plentiful.

      Roadside stands and farmers? markets usually have an abundance. Now is
      prime time for the Big Three of summer produce.

      These pizzas could be grilled. See the cook?s note.


      Tomato and Zucchini Pizza

      Cornmeal for dusting baking sheet
      1 pound pizza dough, thawed if frozen
      4 medium zucchini, about 6 inches in length, washed
      1 tablespoon olive oil
      1 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
      1 cup shredded fontina or a flavored cheese
      4 medium ripe tomatoes, washed, sliced into 1/4 -inch slices
      Fresh basil, cut into shreds, optional
      8 sun-dried tomatoes, not packed in oil, cut into slivers

      Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. If you are using a pizza stone, place
      it in the oven while it?s preheating.

      Dust a baking sheet, if you are using one, with the cornmeal.

      Roll out and shape the pizza dough into 2 crusts. Set them aside.

      Slice the zucchini into 1/4-inch slices on the diagonal.

      In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the
      zucchini and saute a few minutes to slightly soften it and release
      some liquid. Remove from the heat.

      In a bowl, combine the cheeses. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the cheese mixture
      over each pizza dough.

      Top with the zucchini slices and arrange the tomato slices on top.
      Sprinkle the remaining 1/2 cup cheese over the tomatoes. Sprinkle with
      basil and sun-dried tomato slices.

      Bake 12 to 15 minutes or until the crust is browned and the bottom is crisp.

      Remove it from the oven and let it sit a few minutes before slicing.

      Makes two 9-inch pizzas.

      Note: To grill the pizzas, preheat the grill to medium. Roll out the
      dough so it?s thin. Place the dough on the grill and grill about 5
      minutes on one side. Turn over, add the toppings as above and grill
      another 5 minutes or until the cheese is melted. Watch carefully so
      the dough does not burn.

      226 calories (43 percent from fat), 11g fat (4g sat. fat), 24g
      carbohydrates, 8g protein, 407mg sodium, 18mg cholesterol, 1g fiber.

      This salsa goes well on its own with tortilla chips. Or serve it with
      grilled fish or chicken or as a topping on a burger.


      Fresh Garden Salsa

      1 small zucchini, washed, ends removed
      1 small yellow summer squash, washed, ends removed
      4 small roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
      1 small roasted red bell pepper, seeded and finely chopped
      1 roasted poblano chili pepper, seeded and chopped
      1 small red onion, peeled and finely chopped
      1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano or 1 teaspoon dried
      1/4 cup fresh lime juice
      3 tablespoons olive oil
      2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
      1/4 teaspoon sugar
      Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

      To make uniform pieces, dice the zucchini and summer squash by cutting
      off the bottom and standing each one up on a cutting board. Vertically
      slice off a strip about 3/8-inch-thick by about 3/4 inch-wide. Rotate
      the vegetable and cut off 3 more strips. Cut each strip lengthwise
      into 3/8-inch-wide strips. Stack these strips and cut them crosswise
      into m-inch cubes. Transfer them to a bowl and combine with the
      tomatoes, bell and poblano peppers and onion.

      In a small bowl, whisk together the oregano, lime juice, olive oil,
      red wine vinegar and sugar. Pour over the zucchini mixture and season
      to taste with salt and black pepper. Let the salsa sit 15 minutes to
      allow the flavors to meld before serving.

      Makes 4 cups.

      Note: To roast the peppers, place in the broiler and broil on all
      sides until the skin is charred. Remove from broiler and place in a
      bowl. Cover and let sit for 15 minutes; this allows the skins to
      loosen. Remove and discard the skin. Core and seed the peppers.

      ? Adapted from ?12 Best Foods Cookbook? by Dana Jacobi (Rodale, $21.95).

      Per 1/2 cup serving: 37 calories (66 percent from fat ), 3g fat (no
      sat. fat ), 3gcarbohydrates, 1g protein, 29mg sodium, no cholesterol,
      1g fiber.

      To make this salad go further, add cooked large Israeli couscous or
      orzo and double the amount of olive oil and lime juice in the
      dressing.


      Cajun Shrimp and Corn Salad with Lime-Chili Dressing

      1 1/4 pounds medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
      2 to 3 teaspoons Cajun seasoning
      2 tablespoons olive oil
      1 teaspoon minced garlic
      1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes or 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
      Kernels from 6 ears of corn (about 3 cups)
      1/2 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
      1 roasted red bell pepper, cored and diced, optional
      2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

      Lime-Chili Dressing:
      2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
      1 teaspoon ancho chili powder
      1 tablespoon olive oil
      Salt and pepper to taste

      In a medium bowl, combine the shrimp and Cajun seasoning. In a large
      skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shrimp and cook about
      3 minutes, then add the garlic and red pepper flakes and cook until
      shrimp are cooked through, about 4 to 6 minutes.

      Meanwhile, steam the corn kernels for 3 to 4 minutes. Let the shrimp
      and corn cool to room temperature.

      In a large serving bowl, combine the shrimp, corn, tomatoes, roasted
      red pepper if using, and parsley. In a small bowl, combine all the
      dressing ingredients and add to the salad. Mix well and adjust
      seasoning if needed. Serve at room temperature.

      Serves 6.

      ? From ?Raising the Salad Bar? by Catherine Walthers (Lake Isle Press, $19.95).

      234 calories (36 percent from fat ), 9g fat (1g sat. fat ), 16g
      carbohydrates, 21g protein, 330mg sodium, 144mg cholesterol, 2g fiber.



      ------------------------------

      Message: 2
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 17:38:51 -0700
      From: Jamie R <poppianogal@...>
      To: Clipping-Cooking@..., Meat-Lovers@...,
      Cookbook-Cookery@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] Authors explain why boutique meat is a cut
      above
      Message-ID:
      <CAAPhKEBe=4WcAHiECp+ezvxD06Z3bkU21iwKURRjiZ3Z7bRqZg@...>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

      Authors explain why boutique meat is a cut above

      By Andrew Z. Galarneau

      NEWS FOOD WRITER

      Published:August 9, 2011, 3:15 PM
      Updated: August 9, 2011, 3:15 PM

      In recent years, growing numbers of restaurant chefs and home cooks
      have experienced the culinary joys of boutique meats, a satisfying
      alternative to meats from animals raised in the biggest numbers for
      the fattest profits.

      One reason the "sustainable meat" movement hasn't grown faster is a
      lack of craft butchers. Before farmers risk raising small groups of
      animals in time-intensive ways, they want to know there will be a
      market. Local slaughterhouses that would break down animals to order
      for customers have dwindled in number.

      **********
      The Butcher's Guide to Well-Raised Meat
      by Joshua and Jessica Applestone and Alexandra Zissu
      Clarkson Potter; 240 pages, $27.50

      **********
      Into the breach stepped butcher-activists like Joshua and Jessica
      Applestone. In 2004, the couple -- a vegan and a part-time vegetarian
      -- opened Fleisher's Grass-Fed and Organic Meats in Kingston, on the
      Hudson River. They wanted a place to buy the kind of meat they wanted
      to eat themselves, where they could buy a grass-fed rib-eye from a
      butcher who could tell them exactly where it came from, and the best
      way to cook it.

      Their mission, in the largest sense, is the end of mystery meat. "From
      birth to when they become meat in our cases, these animals have been
      touched by only a few sets of hands: the farmer's, the slaughterer's,
      and ours," they write. "We know where they have been every step of the
      way."

      If you don't know where to find such a butcher, the Applestones have
      written a clear, comprehensive manual on how to become one. If you
      have the right gear and an adequate space, you can turn a whole,
      slaughtered lamb, pig or steer into the meat most people see for the
      first time on white foam trays.

      After chapters on their journey to butcherdom and the modern meat
      marketplace, the Applestones start with the basics, like what you call
      the meaty parts of an animal, how to hold a knife and why they use
      wooden cutting blocks. "If you know how to tie your shoes," it says,
      "I can teach you how to tie a roast."

      Food safety rules and techniques are stressed throughout, but the
      Applestones will delineate what health codes dictate in their shop,
      and their sometimes less chemical-reliant cleanup routines for the
      home kitchen.

      The rewards for such a hands-on approach are manifold, the authors
      write. One is fat, an advantage of "nose-to-tail" butchering. Fat
      makes up about 15 percent of an animal, and they find ways to use it,
      whether by making it edible or just in candlemaking. The book also
      covers the best ways to cook organs, without them tasting like they
      earned their label: offal.

      Recipes are not the main reason to make this book yours, but the
      cooking style it recommends is hearty and straightforward. From seared
      steaks finished in the oven to quick sausage and Japanese fried
      chicken, their preparations are relatively easy to execute.



      ------------------------------

      Message: 3
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 18:08:09 -0700
      From: Jamie R <poppianogal@...>
      To: Clipping-Cooking@..., Meat-Lovers@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] Ginger-Plum-Glazed Pork Skewers
      Message-ID:
      <CAAPhKEBbq9EZY7FwMBTA2AtUMffQBhJSc1CFhTzC_uE5q53oCg@...>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

      Summery and light pork skewers

      By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick
      WASHINGTON POST

      Published:August 17, 2011, 12:00 AM in the Buffalo News

      Here, a lean, center-cut pork loin is treated to a glaze made with
      ginger, sesame oil and a fresh plum. The preparation is summery and
      light. The skewered pork cooks quickly on the grill with little prep
      time. A side benefit of making your own marinade and glaze: sodium
      control.

      Make ahead: The pork needs to marinate for at least two hours or
      overnight. If you use wooden or bamboo skewers, soak them in water for
      at least 30 minutes before grilling.


      Ginger-Plum-Glazed Pork Skewers

      For the pork and marinade:

      1 pound boneless pork loin, sliced on the diagonal into 6-inch-long,
      1-inch thick pieces (may substitute boneless, skinless chicken breast
      halves cut into pieces)

      2 tablespoons sherry wine vinegar

      1 tablespoon olive oil

      2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

      2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce

      1 1-inch piece peeled ginger root, grated (1 teaspoon)

      1/2 teaspoon sugar

      For the glaze:

      1 teaspoon olive oil

      1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

      1 1-inch piece peeled ginger root, grated (1 teaspoon)

      1 thin-skinned plum, such as Santa Rosa, pitted and cut intof-inch
      dice ( 1/2 cup)

      3 tablespoons sugar

      1/2 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce

      For serving:

      2 scallions, white and light-green parts, cut crosswise into thin
      slices Toasted sesame seeds, for garnish (optional)

      For the pork and marinade: Trim and discard fat from the pork. Cut the
      loin in half horizontally, as you would a sandwich roll. Place the
      halves cut side down, then cut them lengthwise into 1/2-inch-thick
      slices.

      Whisk together the vinegar, olive oil, sesame oil, soy sauce, ginger
      and sugar in a small bowl; transfer to a resealable plastic food
      storage bag or a shallow dish. Add the pork slices and turn to coat
      thoroughly in the marinade. Cover or seal; refrigerate for at least 2
      hours or as long as overnight.

      When ready to cook, thread each pork slice (or 2 small ones) onto a skewer.

      Preheat the grill to medium-high (450 degrees). Lightly coat the grill
      rack with oil and place it on the grill.

      Meanwhile, make the glaze: Heat the olive oil and sesame oil in a
      small saucepan over medium heat. Add the ginger; cook for 30 seconds.
      Add the diced plum, sugar and soy sauce. Once the sugar has dissolved
      and the mixture begins to boil, reduce the heat to medium-low to
      maintain a slight bubble at the edges. Cook for 6 to 8 minutes, until
      the fruit is soft.

      Use an immersion (stick) blender to puree until smooth, or transfer to
      a blender with the center knob of the lid removed and a towel placed
      over the opening (to allow steam to escape); puree until smooth.
      Transfer to a small bowl.

      Arrange the skewers of marinated pork on the hot grill. Close the
      grill lid; cook for 2 to 4 minutes, until the pork pieces start to
      look cooked on top and the undersides have grill marks.

      Turn the skewers over. Use half the marinade to brush the just-cooked
      sides of the pork. Close the lid and cook for 2 or 3 minutes, until
      the pork is cooked through. Turn the skewers over and brush the
      remaining glaze on the second sides. Close the lid and cook for 1
      minute.

      To serve, transfer the skewers to a platter or serving plate. Garnish
      with the sliced scallions and sesame seeds, if desired. Serve warm.

      Makes about 16 skewers (4 servings).



      ------------------------------

      Message: 4
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 18:24:05 -0700
      From: Jamie R <poppianogal@...>
      To: Clipping-Cooking@..., Meat-Lovers@...,
      Soups-N-Stews@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] Fish stew perfect for summer dining
      Message-ID:
      <CAAPhKEDyRa1FnyzSpzVKPV+4RNU-_Lk=juf4YF6Diffg5x0PEQ@...>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252

      Fish stew perfect for summer dining

      Seafood and San Francisco are a great combination. The Italian
      residents there paired the area?s abundant fresh seafood with tomatoes
      and basil to make cioppino, a light dish perfect for summer dining.

      LINDA GASSENHEIMER; Dinner in Minutes
      Published: 08/17/1112:05 am | Updated: 08/17/11 9:58 am in the Tacoma
      News-Tribune

      Seafood and San Francisco are a great combination. The Italian
      residents there paired the area?s abundant fresh seafood with tomatoes
      and basil to make cioppino, a light dish perfect for summer dining.

      Traditionally, several types of fish and shellfish are used. I?ve used
      mahi mahi and scallops because they are readily available. Any type of
      fish can be used. You can create your own combinations.

      Serve the cioppino with brushchetta, a bread prepared Italian-style.
      Traditionally, the bread is spread with garlic and olive oil, and
      roasted over coals. I simply toast the bread under the broiler or in a
      toaster, and top it with a fresh tomato, onion and garlic mixture.

      HELPFUL HINTS

      What kind to use: Use any type of firm fish, such as tilapia, snapper
      or bass. For shellfish, you can be use mussels, clams, squid, shrimp
      or lobster.

      Shortcut tip: To save preparation time, use diced onion, green bell
      pepper and minced garlic found in the produce section of the market.

      Double duty prep: Both recipes use onion and garlic. Prepare them at
      one time and divide as needed.

      To buy: 1 ripe tomato, 1/4 pound fresh sea scallops, 1/4 pound
      mahi-mahi, 1 medium Vidalia onion, 1 medium green pepper, 1/2 pound
      red potatoes, 1 bottle clam juice (16 ounces needed), 1 jar red pepper
      flakes, 1 can whole tomatoes (about 18 ounces needed), 1 small bunch
      fresh basil and 1 small loaf crusty, whole-grain bread.

      Staples: garlic, balsamic vinegar, olive oil, salt, black peppercorns

      Linda Gassenheimer is the author of 14 cookbooks including ?The
      Flavors of the Florida Keys? and ?Mix ?n Match Meals in Minutes for
      People with Diabetes.? Visit Linda at dinnerinminutes.com or email
      linda@....


      Cioppino

      6 ounces fresh sea scallops

      6 ounces filleted mahi-mahi (aka dolphinfish)

      2 teaspoons olive oil

      1 cup sliced Vidalia onion

      1 cup sliced green bell pepper

      2 medium garlic cloves, crushed

      1/2 pound red potatoes, washed and sliced (about 2 cups)

      2 cups canned whole tomatoes (including juice)

      2 cups bottled clam juice

      1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

      2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

      Salt and freshly ground black pepper

      1/4 cup chopped fresh basil

      Wash scallops and fish, and pat dry with a paper towel. Cut fish into
      pieces about the same size as the scallops.

      Heat oil in a medium-size nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.
      Saute seafood 2 minutes, turn and cook 1 minute. To test, separate the
      flesh with the point of a knife. It should be opaque not translucent.
      Cook an additional minute if needed. Divide between two soup bowls,
      and cover to keep warm.

      Using the same skillet, saute the onion, green bell pepper and garlic
      over medium-high heat 2 minutes. Add potatoes, tomatoes, clam juice
      and red pepper flakes. Bring to a simmer, cover with a lid and cook 15
      minutes.

      Add balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper to taste. Spoon over fish in
      soup bowls. Sprinkle basil on top. Makes 2 servings.

      Per serving: 370 calories (16 percent from fat), 6.5 g fat 1.0 (g
      saturated, 3.5 g monounsaturated), 90 mg cholesterol, 36.0 g protein,
      43.3 g carbohydrates, 6.8 g fiber, 733 mg sodium.


      Bruschetta

      1/2 cup diced tomato

      1/2 tablespoon diced Vidalia onion

      1 small garlic clove, crushed

      1 teaspoon olive oil

      Salt and freshly ground black pepper

      4 thick slices crusty, whole-grain bread

      Stir together the tomato, onion, garlic and olive oil in a small bowl.
      Add salt and pepper to taste. Toast bread in toaster or under broiler.
      Spread the tomato mixture on the bread slices. Makes 2 servings.

      Per serving: 167 calories (24 percent from fat), 4.5 g fat (0.8 g
      saturated, 2.1 g monounsaturated), no cholesterol, 7.4 g protein, 24.5
      g carbohydrates, 4.4 g fiber, 220 mg sodium.

      Read more: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2011/08/17/1785374/fish-stew-perfect-for-summer-dining.html#ixzz1X2Lz28l4



      ------------------------------

      Message: 5
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 18:26:40 -0700
      From: Jamie R <poppianogal@...>
      To: Clipping-Cooking@..., Meat-Lovers@...,
      Simply-Sides@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] Make it a complete meal with kabobs
      Message-ID:
      <CAAPhKEB48Vc1rqUsUSnPXxNRYtmXt2Smrxscuo+YLXnRyA57Yg@...>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252

      Make it a complete meal with kabobs

      You can make the Labor Day holiday count with one last big backyard
      barbecue. You won?t be alone: Labor Day is Monday ? the unofficial end
      of summer and the second most popular time of the year to grill,
      topped by only the Fourth of July.

      SUSAN M. SELASKY; Detroit Free Press
      Published: 08/31/1112:05 am | Updated: 08/31/1112:35 pm in the Tacoma
      News-Tribune

      You can make the Labor Day holiday count with one last big backyard
      barbecue. You won?t be alone: Labor Day is Monday ? the unofficial end
      of summer and the second most popular time of the year to grill,
      topped by only the Fourth of July.

      The meal won?t be laborious when you opt for kabobs ? even when you
      make your own.

      That?s what Jeffrey Gabriel, a certified master chef who?s on the
      faculty at Schoolcraft College in Livonia, Mich., advises. But, be
      selective about the vegetables and meats you use.

      ?Cherry tomatoes don?t grill well,? Gabriel says. ?Pick firm and meaty
      vegetables with a low-moisture content, and make sure the vegetables
      are compatible with the meat.?

      Onions and peppers are good, but also think zucchini, fennel,
      eggplant, asparagus or fruits such as pineapple and peaches.

      ?A variety of mushrooms work well, such as oyster mushrooms, which get
      crispy on the grill,? Gabriel says.

      Gabriel says that tender cuts of meats and poultry work best. Think
      flatiron steak, sirloin, pork loin or tenderloin, and chicken breasts
      or thighs.

      ?Anything you would make a steak out of would be excellent for kabobs?
      he says. If you are using fish, Gabriel says to use a firm fish such
      as halibut and maybe salmon. ?Cod and whitefish don?t work well,? he
      says.

      The biggest challenge is getting the meat and vegetables to cook
      evenly, so be sure to cut them in uniform-size pieces.

      Another important step, Gabriel says, is to marinate the meat, which
      adds flavor and tenderizes. But marinating actually firms up fish
      rather than making it tender.

      Gabriel suggests switching up marinades by using a lighter or
      different variety of vinegar, adding bold flavors with cumin or smoked
      paprika, or with herbs.

      ?All the lemon herbs, such as verbena and balm, are great for chicken
      and fish,? Gabriel says.

      Rick Knox, 46, of Farmington, Mich., finds that kabobs please the whole family.

      ?They are easy to prepare, easy to eat, and when you use a variety of
      vegetables, you can make it a complete meal,? he says.

      Knox prefers to make kabobs by skewering the veggies and the meats
      separately. And that?s just what Gabriel recommends: ?They cook just
      perfect if you separate everything, meat on one and veggies on the
      other.?


      Southwest Beef Kabobs
      Makes 6
      Preparation time: 10 minutes, plus marinating time
      Total time: 45 minutes

      For the kabobs:

      1-3/4 pounds sirloin, cut into 1-1/2- to 2-inch even cubes

      Wood or metal skewers

      For the marinade:

      1/2 cup olive or canola oil

      2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

      Fresh ground black pepper to taste

      1 teaspoon salt

      1 large clove garlic, peeled, minced

      1 tablespoon ancho chili powder or favorite chili powder

      1 teaspoon smoked paprika

      1 tablespoon brown sugar

      3 poblano peppers or favorite peppers, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces

      2 small white onions, quartered and separated into pieces

      Place the beef in a zip-top plastic bag. Whisk together all of the
      marinade ingredients. Remove about 1/4 cup of the marinade and reserve
      it. Pour the remaining marinade over the beef, seal bag and
      refrigerate for several hours or overnight. Soak the wood skewers in
      warm water for at least 30 minutes.

      Preheat the grill to medium-high.

      Thread the beef cubes on the skewer alternating with the pepper and
      onion pieces. Grill, turning occasionally, about 8 to 10 minutes, or
      until cooked to desired degree of doneness. Baste with the reserved
      marinade during the last few minutes of grilling.

      Source: Tested by Susan Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.


      Sweet and Tangy Pork and Pineapple Kabobs
      Makes 6
      Preparation time: 15 minutes, plus marinating time
      Total time: 45 minutes

      For the marinade:

      1/2 cup olive or canola oil

      1/4 cup orange juice

      2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

      2 tablespoons brown sugar

      1/2 teaspoon salt

      1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

      For the pork:

      1 pork tenderloin, about 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 pounds, cut into even 1-1/2-inch chunks

      2 cups 1-1/2-inch pineapple chunks

      1 sweet red or yellow pepper, cut into 1-1/2-inch chunks

      Wood skewers (soaked in hot water)

      In a small bowl, whisk together all of the marinade ingredients.
      Remove 1/4 cup of the marinade and reserve it. Place the pork chunks
      in a plastic bag or bowl, and pour the remaining marinade over the
      pork. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours.

      Preheat the grill to medium-high.

      Thread the pork cubes on the skewers alternating with the pineapple
      and pepper pieces. Grill, turning frequently, about 10 to 12 minutes
      or until cooked through. Baste with the reserved marinade during the
      last few minutes of grilling.

      Source: Tested by Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.
      Nutritional information not available.


      Lamb, Sweet Pepper and Onion Kabobs
      Makes 4
      Preparation time: 10 minutes, plus marinating time
      Total time: 40 minutes

      For the marinade:

      1/3 cup olive or canola oil

      1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

      1 tablespoon chopped fresh herbs, such as oregano, rosemary or tarragon

      2 cloves garlic, peeled, minced

      1 teaspoon cumin

      1 tablespoon honey

      1/4 teaspoon salt

      Few grinds of black pepper

      For the lamb:

      1 pound boneless lamb, cut into 1-1/2-inch cubes

      2 sweet yellow or red peppers, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces

      1 medium red onion, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces

      Wood skewers (soaked in hot water)

      Tzatziki sauce (see cook?s note)

      In a small bowl, whisk together all of the marinade ingredients.
      Reserve about 1/4 cup of the marinade. Place the lamb pieces in a bag
      or bowl, and pour the remaining marinade over. Stir to coat the lamb
      with the marinade. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight.

      Preheat the grill to medium-high.

      Thread the marinated lamb cubes on skewers, alternating with the
      pepper and onion pieces. Grill, turning frequently, about 7 to 10
      minutes, or until just cooked through. Baste with the reserved
      marinade during the last few minutes of grilling. Remove and serve
      with grilled pita and tzaziki sauce.

      Cook?s note: To make the tzatziki sauce, mix 1/2 cup peeled, seeded
      and chopped cucumber with 1/3 cup plain Greek-style yogurt and 1/3 cup
      sour cream (or use 2/3 cup of either one), salt and pepper, 1 minced
      large clove garlic and fresh (or dried) oregano or dill, to taste.

      Source: Adapted from Food & Drink magazine, summer 2010 issue.


      Roasted Potato Salad With Garden Herb Dressing
      Serves: 8
      Preparation time: 10 minutes
      Total time: 1 hour

      2 to 2-1/2 pounds small to medium red skin potatoes, scrubbed

      2 tablespoons olive oil

      1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

      1/4 teaspoon black pepper

      1 bunch of green onions or a small bunch of chives, chopped

      1 cup thinly sliced celery

      4 hard-cooked eggs, shelled and chopped, optional

      1-1/4 cups reduced-fat mayonnaise

      2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

      1 teaspoon salt

      1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

      Favorite all-purpose seasoning blend to taste

      1/4 cup mix of fresh chopped herbs such dill, tarragon and flat-leaf parsley

      Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the potatoes into wedges and
      place on a baking sheet that has sides. Drizzle with the oil and
      sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss to coat evenly. Bake for 35
      minutes or until potatoes are golden brown on the cut side and tender.
      Remove from oven and cool. Place the potatoes in a serving bowl and
      add the green onions, celery and, if using, the eggs, and mix.

      In a small bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, salt,
      pepper and seasoning blend. Mix thoroughly. Fold in the fresh herbs.
      Taste and adjust seasonings. Add to the potatoes and mix thoroughly.
      Serve immediately, or cover and chill to serve later.

      Source: Tested by Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.
      Nutritional information not available.


      Orzo Garden Salad
      Serves: 6
      Preparation time: 15 minutes
      Total time: 15 minutes

      For the salad:

      8 ounces (about 1/2 box) orzo

      2 cups chopped garden tomatoes

      1/3 cup mix of chopped fresh herbs such as basil, oregano, tarragon
      and flat-leaf parsley

      4 green onions, thinly sliced

      1 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, diced

      1 teaspoon favorite herb seasoning blend

      For the vinaigrette:

      1/2 cup olive oil

      1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

      2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

      Freshly ground black pepper to taste

      1/2 teaspoon salt

      1 small shallot, peeled, minced

      Cook the orzo according to package directions. Rinse and drain well.
      Place the orzo in a serving bowl and add the tomatoes, herbs, green
      onions and cucumber. Sprinkle with herb seasoning and toss to mix.

      In a small bowl or jar with a lid, combine all the vinaigrette
      ingredients. Whisk well, or shake the jar to combine. Pour over the
      salad and mix together. Serve immediately or chill before serving.

      Source: Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen. Nutritional
      information not available.

      Read more: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2011/08/31/1802867/make-it-a-complete-meal-with-kabobs.html#ixzz1X2MVQr00



      ------------------------------

      Message: 6
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 18:27:57 -0700
      From: Jamie R <poppianogal@...>
      To: Clipping-Cooking@..., Meat-Lovers@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] Shrimp salad just right for warm days
      Message-ID:
      <CAAPhKECULMpZ8TnhtJ4v9J5XGuXRTJRbYR01MTvJJ_v8UFvn8w@...>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

      Shrimp salad just right for warm days

      This no-cook, 15-minute, summer supper is perfect for a hot night.
      Plump shrimp layered with vegetables and dressed with a light
      vinaigrette dressing make a cool, colorful main dish.

      LINDA GASSENHEIMER; Dinner in Minutes
      Published: 08/31/1112:05 am in the Tacoma News-Tribune

      This no-cook, 15-minute, summer supper is perfect for a hot night.
      Plump shrimp layered with vegetables and dressed with a light
      vinaigrette dressing make a cool, colorful main dish.

      To make this meal fast with a homemade touch, I doctor a bottled
      low-fat vinaigrette with chopped onion and tarragon. You can find
      fresh, chopped or diced onion in the produce section of the market.

      HELPFUL HINTS

      For a quick side dish, sprinkle slices of whole grain baguette with
      grated Parmesan cheese to make crisp crostini.

      Substitute: Any type of bread can be used for the crostini.

      Cheese: Buy good-quality Parmesan cheese and grate or chop it in the
      food processor. Freeze extra for quick use. You can quickly spoon out
      what you need and leave the rest frozen.

      Greens: Any type of salad greens can be used.

      Display: A clear glass bowl makes the salad a visual treat.

      Drink: This light, crisp dish would go well with a light, crisp pinot grigio.

      To buy: 1 small container diced or chopped onion; 1 bottle dried
      tarragon; 3/4 pound cooked, peeled shrimp; 1 bag washed, ready-to-eat
      mixed baby greens; 1 cucumber; 1 package frozen corn kernels or 2 ears
      fresh corn; 1 medium tomato; 1 whole grain french baguette; 1 piece
      Parmesan cheese or grated Parmesan cheese.

      Staples: Reduced-fat oil and vinegar dressing, olive oil spray, salt
      and black peppercorns.

      This meal contains 572 calories per serving with 22 percent of
      calories from fat.


      Layered Shrimp Salad
      Serves 2

      3 tablespoons reduced-fat oil and vinegar dressing

      1 tablespoon diced or chopped onion

      1 teaspoon dried tarragon

      3/4 pound cooked, peeled, medium-size shrimp

      Salt and freshly ground pepper

      1/2 bag washed, ready-to-eat mixed baby greens (about 2 1/2 cups)

      1/2 medium cucumber, peeled and sliced

      2 cups corn kernels, fresh or frozen

      1 medium tomato, sliced

      Mix dressing, onion and tarragon.

      Place shrimp in a small bowl and toss with 1 tablespoon of dressing.
      Sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste.

      Arrange greens in the bottom of a salad bowl. Layer cucumbers on top.
      Sprinkle corn over cucumber slices. Drizzle 1 tablespoon dressing over
      these vegetables. Place a layer of shrimp on top and drizzle remaining
      dressing over the salad.

      Arrange the sliced tomatoes around the edge of the bowl. Sprinkle the
      tomatoes with salt and pepper, to taste.

      Per serving: 358 calories (17 percent from fat), 6.8 g fat (1.2 g
      saturated, 1.6 g monounsaturated), 260 mg cholesterol, 41.3 g protein,
      37.1 g carbohydrates, 5.7 g fiber, 291 mg sodium.


      Parmesan Crostini
      Serves 2

      Olive oil spray

      1/2 whole grain french baguette, sliced on the diagonal into 6 rounds

      2 tablespoons grated fresh Parmesan cheese

      Heat broiler or toaster oven. Spray olive oil over bread rounds.
      Sprinkle Parmesan on top. Place under broiler about 6 inches from heat
      for 1 to 2 minutes, or until cheese starts to melt.

      Per serving: 214 calories (30 percent from fat), 7.2 g fat (1.8 g
      saturated, 4.0 g monounsaturated), 4 mg cholesterol, 6.9 g protein,
      30.3 g carbohydrates, 2.0 g fiber, 352 mg sodium.

      Read more: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2011/08/31/1802888/shrimp-salad-just-right-for-warm.html#ixzz1X2MxmAYc



      ------------------------------

      Message: 7
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 19:16:43 -0700
      From: Jamie R <craftncook@...>
      To: Meat-Lovers@..., Just-Main-Dishes@...,
      Recipe-Riot@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] THEME: Quick and Easy Tacos
      Message-ID: <p06240806ca89e0701831@[192.168.2.124]>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

      Quick and Easy Tacos

      1 to 1 1/2 pounds good ground beef
      1 can Frito's brand jalapeno bean dip
      Taco shells
      Shredded lettuce
      Chopped tomato
      Grated cheddar cheese

      Brown ground beef, season with salt and pepper. Stir in bean dip.

      Fill taco shell with this mixture, then add lettuce, tomato and
      grated cheddar cheese.

      Source: Jane Reed in the Harrison Daily Times, March 11, 2008



      ------------------------------

      Message: 8
      Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2011 19:17:21 -0700
      From: Jamie R <craftncook@...>
      To: Meat-Lovers@...,
      Just-Grains-n-Legumes@..., Recipe-Riot@...
      Subject: [Meat-Lovers] THEME: Mexican Fire Rice
      Message-ID: <p06240804ca89e06b16dd@[192.168.2.124]>
      Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

      Mexican Fire Rice

      2 2/3 cups water
      1 1/3 cups uncooked long grain white rice
      1 pound ground pork breakfast sausage
      1 (16 ounce) jar picante sauce
      1 (8 ounce) container sour cream
      8 ounces cheddar cheese, shredded

      In a medium saucepan, bring the water to a boil. Stir in the rice.
      Reduce heat, cover and simmer 20 minutes.

      Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

      In a skillet over medium heat, cook the sausage until evenly brown.

      In a medium baking dish, mix the cooked rice, cooked sausage, picante
      sauce and sour cream. Top with cheddar cheese.

      Bake 20 minutes in the preheated oven, until cheese is bubbly.

      Source: Roz Lanier in the Harrison Daily Times, March 11, 2008



      ------------------------------

      _______________________________________________
      Meat-Lovers mailing list
      Meat-Lovers@...
      http://mail.cooking-lists.com/mailman/listinfo/meat-lovers_cooking-lists.com


      Please feel free to share list recipes with others, so long as the poster and the list are included as part of the source.

      To unsubscribe, send a blank e-mail with UNSUBSCRIBE in the Subject to Meat-Lovers-request@....

      End of Meat-Lovers Digest, Vol 10, Issue 65
      *******************************************
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.