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watching the Moon Walk?

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  • WilliamXmas@aol.com
    What was the state of amateur astronomy when the Moon Landing happened? Would it have been possible to watch the entire thing? Thanks for any info or links to
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 5, 2010
      What was the state of amateur astronomy when the Moon Landing happened?
      Would it have been possible to watch the entire thing?
      Thanks for any info or links to explore on this subject.
      Bill


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Christopher Erickson
      Even big professional telescopes are not powerful enough to have viewed the Moon landings. The craft were simply too tiny and too far away. However many ham
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 5, 2010
        Even big professional telescopes are not powerful enough to
        have viewed the Moon landings. The craft were simply too tiny
        and too far away.

        However many ham radio operators used high gain directional
        antennas to listen to and watch many of the Apollo radio and
        video transmissions. Same as they had done during the Gemini
        and Mercury programs. Even the Soviets listened in and were
        convinced beyond all doubt that the Americans had indeed beat
        them to the Moon.

        Moon landing hoax conspiracy theorists don't want to talk
        about it.

        "My advice is always free and worth every penny!"

        -Christopher Erickson
        Network Design Engineer
        Waikoloa Village, HI 96738
        N19°57' W155°47'
        Meade 16" LX200 SCT
        www.data-plumber.com



        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        > WilliamXmas@...
        > Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 2:34 PM
        > To: Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com
        > Cc: AnnCats@...
        > Subject: [MeadeUncensored] watching the Moon Walk?
        >
        > What was the state of amateur astronomy when the Moon Landing
        > happened?
        > Would it have been possible to watch the entire thing?
        > Thanks for any info or links to explore on this subject.
        > Bill
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • autostaretx
        Even the largest telescopes of that era (such as the 200 Palomar) do not have the resolution to see anything that small on the moon s surface. It s a
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 5, 2010
          Even the largest telescopes of that era (such as the 200" Palomar)
          do not have the resolution to see anything that small on the moon's
          surface.

          It's a combination of "angular resolution" and the usual earth-bound
          problem of the image being smeared by passing through the air.
          But even Hubble can't see the lunar landers (the descent stages are
          still there).

          have fun
          --dick

          --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, WilliamXmas@... wrote:
          >
          > What was the state of amateur astronomy when the Moon Landing happened?
          > Would it have been possible to watch the entire thing?
          > Thanks for any info or links to explore on this subject.
          > Bill
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • John Mahony
          ... But I wonder if any of these craft could have been seen when they were orbiting the moon. It s not uncommon for asteroid/NEO hunters to get thrown off by
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 6, 2010
            ----- Original Message ----

            > From: autostaretx <rseymour@...>
            >
            > Even the largest telescopes of that era (such as the 200" Palomar)
            > do not have the resolution to see anything that small on the moon's
            > surface.

            But I wonder if any of these craft could have been seen when they were orbiting the moon.

            It's not uncommon for asteroid/NEO hunters to get thrown off by some old rocket body from an interplanetary probe, where the leftover booster is still "barely" in earth orbit, about that far out.

            -John


            > --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, WilliamXmas@... wrote:
            > >
            > > What was the state of amateur astronomy when the Moon Landing happened?
            > > Would it have been possible to watch the entire thing?
            > > Thanks for any info or links to explore on this subject.
            > > Bill
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • Roger Hill
            I read, somewhere, that the Command/Service Module and LM would have been about 16th magnitude. Since they were orbiting only 60 miles above the surface, and
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 6, 2010
              I read, somewhere, that the Command/Service Module and LM would have
              been about 16th magnitude. Since they were orbiting only 60 miles above
              the surface, and the moon is 2160 miles in diameter, the maximum
              separation would have been 60/2160 * 1800 arc seconds or 50 arc seconds
              (a bit bigger than the diameter of Jupiter). That's a very small
              separation.



              Ahh...you say, but what if they were above the unlit portion of the
              Moon? Then they wouldn't be lit, either. There might be a minute or
              two where they are in sunlight, and the suface below them is unlit (same
              way we see satellites in orbit above earth), but you've still got the
              separation issue.



              I had a chat with a Moon landing denier about this during a sidewalk
              astronomy event I did for my astronomy club and said the same
              thing...Jodrell Bank was quite happy that they were receiving signals
              from the Moon, as was Parkes in Australia. Parkes would certainly have
              noticed if they been asked to point their dish at the Moon, and they
              heard nothing. There was no doubt that there was something on the Moon
              at the time that was broadcasting voice, video and telemetry. There was
              certainly something in orbit, too, that was responding to questions with
              exactly the right time delay, at the same time there was something on
              the surface.



              The general public was also told when and where to look the evening
              before re-entry. I remember going outside and seeing Apollo 13 the
              night before. The position of where to look was published in the local
              paper.



              I told the denier, that if he wanted, he could get an archive copy of
              the newspaper, check the position, and see if it was accurate. He said
              he didn't know anything at all about orbits and stuff. But, I said, the
              issue isn't whether he knows how to do it or not, but that he can, IF HE
              WANTS TO.



              Obviously he'd rather argue than go and check it out for himself.



              Same thing with the photographs and lack of stars. I told him to take a
              picture of his backyard during the day, with a bright sun, of a guy
              dressed in white. He should note the exposure, and then go outside that
              night and take a picture of the night sky using the same lens, aperture,
              shutter speed and ISO rating, hand held, and see if any stars turn up.
              It's a very simple and easy experiment. For this one, he didn't need to
              know anything about orbital mechanics.



              We talked about all sorts of things, and I told him to go and check for
              himself. Some things would take years to learn, like why we cannot
              reproduce lunar rocks using earth rocks as a starting point. But if he
              applied himself, surely he could get to the point where he could run the
              tests himself.



              I told him that the scientific community was quite satisfied as to the
              reality of the Moon landings; that the rocks the Russians had returned
              with their lander matched what the US brought back; that, ultimately,
              science is based on evidence. If a web site he read said otherwise, he
              needed to run some simple tests for himself.



              I told him to get in touch with me when he'd done this...I'd be
              interested in what he found. Particularly so if the tests he ran
              corroborated what the denier web sites said.



              That was two years ago...I haven't seen him since.



              Roger Hill

              (Just outside of)Toronto, Canada



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • matthewota
              If you go to your local library and check out Sky & Tels that are contemporary to the Apollo Program. There were amateurs back then that were able to
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 8, 2010
                If you go to your local library and check out Sky & Tels that are contemporary to the Apollo Program. There were amateurs back then that were able to photograph S-IVB propellant dumps after TEI burns. They were also able to image the gas and debris cloud after Apollo 13 had it's oxygen tank explode.

                --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, WilliamXmas@... wrote:
                >
                > What was the state of amateur astronomy when the Moon Landing happened?
                > Would it have been possible to watch the entire thing?
                > Thanks for any info or links to explore on this subject.
                > Bill
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Neil Drage
                You should take a look at this site: http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/space/apollo.html It s got a lot of photos from then showing various elements of the Apollo
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 9, 2010
                  You should take a look at this site:

                  http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/space/apollo.html

                  It's got a lot of photos from then showing various elements of the Apollo
                  missions using amateur equipment.

                  It's very interesting to see what amateurs could do back then with primative
                  film...

                  Neil


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • WilliamXmas@aol.com
                  Thanks to all that answered my question about the state of amateur astronomy at the time of the moon walk. I knew that this was the best group to ask. Bill
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 12, 2010
                    Thanks to all that answered my question about the state of amateur
                    astronomy at the time of the moon walk. I knew that this was the best group to ask.
                    Bill


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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