Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MeadeUncensored] Re: Need help deciding on a scope

Expand Messages
  • John Mahony
    ... But at this point he s just talking about the moon and planets, which are easy to find in a dob. The 80mm scope will be good on the moon but the planets
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- Thad Floryan <thad@...> wrote:

      > --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, goldenights@... wrote:
      > >
      > > I fully agree.Invest in a 6" Dob.
      >
      >
      > ... the frustration level can be quite high for
      > someone who doesn't know the sky and doesn't have sky charts to aid
      > finding objects.

      But at this point he's just talking about the moon and planets, which are easy
      to find in a dob.

      The 80mm scope will be good on the moon but the planets will be very small.
      The 114mm (4.5") reflector will show a basic but still small image of the
      planets, and detail is limited on them.
      A 6" or 8" dob will show significant detail on the planets, and give a much
      better view of deep-sky objects.

      Meade doesn't currently sell small basic dobs (they do have truss-tube dobs
      starting at 8", but truss tube construction is more expensive).
      Orion sells 6" and 8" dobs, and the price of the 6" is less than the etx80
      <http://www.telescope.com/jump.jsp?itemType=CATEGORY&itemID=8>
      They even sell a computerized version (no motors, but the display shows you
      which way to move the scope to find an object).

      Orion does a much better job of novice-level scopes than Meade or Celestron.
      Both M and C are too busy trying to show off their high-tech gadgetry, which
      doesn't always work too well when they have to build it almost entirely out of
      plastic to sell it at those prices.

      Aperture is king when it comes to what you can atually see through the scope.

      > The monthly sky charts in the various astronomy magazines will also
      > be very helpful as is this (which is free):
      >
      > <http://www.skymaps.com/>
      >
      > Probably even better would be one of the planetarium or charting
      > programs; there are a lot of them available.

      Cartes du Ciel at <http://stargazing.net/astropc> is excellent, and free. It
      _is_ geared somewhat towards people who already know the basics and the
      terminology, but once you get past what you can find with the monthly magazine
      maps it's a great program.

      -John



      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates
      (http://voice.yahoo.com)
    • goldenights@uniserve.com
      SkyWatcher also sells very competitively priced dob s in the 6 and 8 sizes. Check out their website. The offer a great product for the price and customer
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        SkyWatcher also sells very competitively priced dob's in the 6 and 8' sizes.
        Check out their website. The offer a great product for the price and customer
        service is also great.





        Quoting John Mahony <jmmahony@...>:

        > --- Thad Floryan <thad@...> wrote:
        >
        > > --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, goldenights@... wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I fully agree.Invest in a 6" Dob.
        > >
        > >
        > > ... the frustration level can be quite high for
        > > someone who doesn't know the sky and doesn't have sky charts to aid
        > > finding objects.
        >
        > But at this point he's just talking about the moon and planets, which are
        > easy
        > to find in a dob.
        >
        > The 80mm scope will be good on the moon but the planets will be very small.
        > The 114mm (4.5") reflector will show a basic but still small image of the
        > planets, and detail is limited on them.
        > A 6" or 8" dob will show significant detail on the planets, and give a much
        > better view of deep-sky objects.
        >
        > Meade doesn't currently sell small basic dobs (they do have truss-tube dobs
        > starting at 8", but truss tube construction is more expensive).
        > Orion sells 6" and 8" dobs, and the price of the 6" is less than the etx80
        > <http://www.telescope.com/jump.jsp?itemType=CATEGORY&itemID=8>
        > They even sell a computerized version (no motors, but the display shows you
        > which way to move the scope to find an object).
        >
        > Orion does a much better job of novice-level scopes than Meade or Celestron.
        >
        > Both M and C are too busy trying to show off their high-tech gadgetry, which
        > doesn't always work too well when they have to build it almost entirely out
        > of
        > plastic to sell it at those prices.
        >
        > Aperture is king when it comes to what you can atually see through the
        > scope.
        >
        > > The monthly sky charts in the various astronomy magazines will also
        > > be very helpful as is this (which is free):
        > >
        > > <http://www.skymaps.com/>
        > >
        > > Probably even better would be one of the planetarium or charting
        > > programs; there are a lot of them available.
        >
        > Cartes du Ciel at <http://stargazing.net/astropc> is excellent, and free.
        > It
        > _is_ geared somewhat towards people who already know the basics and the
        > terminology, but once you get past what you can find with the monthly
        > magazine
        > maps it's a great program.
        >
        > -John
        >
        >
        >
        >
        _______________________________________________________________________________
        _____
        > Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates
        > (http://voice.yahoo.com)
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.