Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MeadeUncensored] Focuser: cheaper upgrade kit, better upgrade kit, instructions

Expand Messages
  • Andy Eskelson
    ... That s due to several things: Poorly formed threads. (not too likely) Damaged threads. (easy to damage, but once done up they are protected) Crud in
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      >
      > But if you don't do the full upgrade, it might make that part easier to remove
      > the next time you want to. This part was nearly impossible to remove the first
      > time I tried it.

      That's due to several things:

      Poorly formed threads. (not too likely)
      Damaged threads. (easy to damage, but once done up they are protected)
      Crud in threads (bits of swarf grit etc easily done prob the most common issue)
      Knob tightened by a gorilla! (prob the 2nd most common)

      Another possibility is that someone put a spot of locktight of the threads, I can't think why that would be done, but it's possible.

      Cleaning out the crud and a small amount of lube won't hurt as I said.
      The action is for the 'feel' of the focuser to be set by how hard you tighten up the focus knob, compressing the plastic washers, and that point is locked by the two grubscrews.


      Andy
    • plalbrecht
      Hi, Andy. ... Thanks very much. ... works very well. Glad to hear it. See, folks, it s not rocket science... People with some machine tools can make this
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi, Andy.
        >
        > Nice set of instructions Pete,

        Thanks very much.


        > The stage II system is exactly what I made for my classic and it
        works very well.

        Glad to hear it. See, folks, it's not rocket science... People with
        some machine tools can make this themselves. Those who don't have
        tools, I'm happy to sell them this stuff and it should be obvious I'm
        not going to get rich on this. I'm not in the least bugged by "lost
        sales." I am bugged by people who charge obscene prices for
        hardware-store items with no added value. Or who try to keep their
        instructions secret. There's too much "secret" data in this corner of
        the hobby as it is.

        My bushings are black anodized. That's not critical; it makes them
        look nice, adds a protective layer, and is harder than bare aluminum
        -- but with those hardened washers in place, it's not that important.
        I anodize because I can. Most people can't.


        Already in the works is another set of instructions for the dec lock.
        I don't agree with using a cork ring as a "clutch," but I'm happy to
        make such available for, say, $5, not $30, to people who feel they
        have to have that. There are better ways to deal with the dec lock
        "problem." (What problem? I don't have one). But that's grist for
        another thread.


        > The bike grease, very good stuff indeed, I use it on my machine gibs
        etc. (for people in the UK it is available in Halfords)

        Since I wrote that, I've found a brown-red synthetic that I like just
        as much, maybe better. It's not as viscous as Mobil 1 Synthetic (which
        I think is too heavy for this job) and promises to keep its properties
        at very low temps. But then, as a test, I did put the bike grease in
        the freezer and it didn't seem to affect it. What I don't like about
        the bike grease is that the stuff yellows after a while. But that
        doesn't seem to affect its function.

        >
        > Just a couple of points that you might want to consider all on the
        Mk2 :-
        >
        > You seem to be slightly too fond of the grease :-)

        A little is good, a lot is better, and too much is just right.
        Besides, 1) it's self regulating and 2) this is for illustrative
        purposes anyway...



        > The first point is that you don't really need to grease the threads
        that the silver focuser knob screws onto.

        True, but it doesn't hurt, and I'm thinking galling. If any trash is
        in there, caught in the threads, this might mitigate it somewhat. (And
        that's my rationalization for the day).


        > A little is fine, but that part does not rotate, nor is it intended
        to do so. Overgreasing just makes it messy.

        Well... self-regulating, again. What's not needed, gets squozed out.


        > The other point is again with greasing, but with the thrust washers.
        You want the bearings to carry the load, after all that's why you are
        using them. So you do not want to put grease on the outside surfaces
        of the washers, i.e. no grease between the brass flange and the thrust
        washer nor between the silver focus knob and the thrust washer. What
        you want is for the outer thrust washers to turn with the focus knob
        and the brass flange running on the rollers. What you don't want is
        the brass or the focus know rotating against the washer that defeats
        the object of the mod.
        >
        > I seriously doubt that it will make a blind bit of difference in
        such as lightly loaded application but it's worth thinking about.

        That's a valid point, but I agree, it won't make much difference. I
        suppose the forced lubrication idea, with high-pressure forced
        lubrication, oil injectors, heat exchangers, etc. which I was planning
        for Mark III, is right out then...


        > Lastly I did not spot one, but it would be worth while including a
        mention that scopes above 10" have a spring that carries some of the
        mirror weight. I think it is all scopes that have a locking bolt, but
        to be honest I'm not totally 100% sure. If you lift off the focus rod
        on such a scope, the mirror with move forward and it takes a bit of
        fishing to hook it again. Best is to move the mirror back and insert
        the locking bolt before removing the focuser assembly.

        I think that varies with model and year. My 12" GPS does not have a
        spring, for example, and the last focus movement should be done CCW to
        "push" the mirror away. On my scope, with the tube more or less level,
        the mirror stays where it's put when I pull or push that rod.

        You're right, I probably should add something to make people at least
        aware of that spring, but I don't know which models had it and when.
        Given the current instructions, I don't think it's going to jeopardize
        the job if people find there's a spring in there.

        Something I didn't want to put in the instructions because I thought
        people might just get in trouble was, when moving the rod to
        distribute the grease, it doesn't hurt to wiggle the rod
        circumferentially too, to spread the grease around, as well as along,
        the baffle tube. Can't hurt -- unless you shove the rod around so far
        that you have to do something strange to get it back again.


        > That's my 2 pennyworth...
        > what do you think

        You know what I think? I think this is a much friendlier group, at
        least in terms of this stuff, than LX200GPS. I posted the exact same
        announcement there, and immediately drew flames from The Other Guy's
        true believers.

        The funny thing is, I had discussed this mod the night before with one
        of the leading lights of Meadedom. Here's part of the conversation:

        ===============

        > > You realize of course that a certain someone is going to pick this to
        > > pieces (or
        > > actually not "him"....it will be a whole bunch of cronies that he will
        > > have posting all
        > > sorts of remarks about this); at any rate you have done well and
        > > presented some very
        > > vital information; also like the needle bearing kit.


        > Yup. I've seen this before -- the guru worship syndrome -- in just
        about every hobby.

        ================




        > Andy

        Thanks, Andy. I appreciate your comments.

        Pete
      • Andy Eskelson
        I think I read somewhere, probl. on one of these groups, that part of every observatory was a well equipped machine shop. I m always interested in making
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          I think I read somewhere, probl. on one of these groups, that part of every observatory was a well equipped machine shop. I'm always interested in making various bolt-on bit's.

          I'm not interested in doing things on a comercial or even a semi comercial basis, but if you are more power to you - it's helping many users after all.

          I'm working on a simple electric focuser at the moment, not got very far due to other things intruding, but one day I'll finish it :-)
          Biggest problem is finding some way to mount the various odds and ends on the back of the scope without drilling it, got a couple of ideas but nothing in metal as yet.

          The other project that is on the books is my own set of acc. rails - like the focuser the comercial products are way overpriced for what is a couple of brackets and a rod or two. It's also a nice easy machine project as well. I don't have anything to hang on scope rails at the moment, well not until I make the cannon FD lens adaptor - these 'little' jobs keep cropping up :-) , so rails are on the back burner for the moment.

          as for the red grease, sounds interesting but the bike grease is prob good enough and seems to be easily available. When I was building Radar / Sonar systems the stock grease was brown MS1 we used it for nearly everything, (packing bearings, shaft lube, gears etc.)and it did a really good job, and in a very hostile enviroment.
          I did run a test for a contract that was won, and I set up two Turning mechs (the bit that drives the scanner around) one was using MS1 and the other a special low temp grease. I pumped the test chamber down to -40 C and left it there for three days. When the day of the demo came, we flipped the power switches and the low temp greased unit worked as if nothing had changed, The unit with MS1 locked solid. Needless to say all the 'artic' spec systems got the new grease from that point on.

          The Dec lock - yes $30 is steep for a bit of cork. So far no problems here, but then I don't have anything attached to the scope to increase the load on the clutch.

          We used to use what we called 'Tufnel' ('scuse the spelling this was about 25+ years ago) which was a resin impregneted fabric for various clutch systems and that proved to be very successful.


          Andy


          On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 19:32:03 -0000
          "plalbrecht" <plalbrecht@...> wrote:

          > Hi, Andy.
          > >
          > > Nice set of instructions Pete,
          >
          > Thanks very much.
          >
          >
          > > The stage II system is exactly what I made for my classic and it
          > works very well.
          >
          > Glad to hear it. See, folks, it's not rocket science... People with
          > some machine tools can make this themselves. Those who don't have
          > tools, I'm happy to sell them this stuff and it should be obvious I'm
          > not going to get rich on this. I'm not in the least bugged by "lost
          > sales." I am bugged by people who charge obscene prices for
          > hardware-store items with no added value. Or who try to keep their
          > instructions secret. There's too much "secret" data in this corner of
          > the hobby as it is.
          >
          > My bushings are black anodized. That's not critical; it makes them
          > look nice, adds a protective layer, and is harder than bare aluminum
          > -- but with those hardened washers in place, it's not that important.
          > I anodize because I can. Most people can't.
          >
          >
          > Already in the works is another set of instructions for the dec lock.
          > I don't agree with using a cork ring as a "clutch," but I'm happy to
          > make such available for, say, $5, not $30, to people who feel they
          > have to have that. There are better ways to deal with the dec lock
          > "problem." (What problem? I don't have one). But that's grist for
          > another thread.
          >
          >
          > > The bike grease, very good stuff indeed, I use it on my machine gibs
          > etc. (for people in the UK it is available in Halfords)
          >
          > Since I wrote that, I've found a brown-red synthetic that I like just
          > as much, maybe better. It's not as viscous as Mobil 1 Synthetic (which
          > I think is too heavy for this job) and promises to keep its properties
          > at very low temps. But then, as a test, I did put the bike grease in
          > the freezer and it didn't seem to affect it. What I don't like about
          > the bike grease is that the stuff yellows after a while. But that
          > doesn't seem to affect its function.
          >
          > >
          > > Just a couple of points that you might want to consider all on the
          > Mk2 :-
          > >
          > > You seem to be slightly too fond of the grease :-)
          >
          > A little is good, a lot is better, and too much is just right.
          > Besides, 1) it's self regulating and 2) this is for illustrative
          > purposes anyway...
          >
          >
          >
          > > The first point is that you don't really need to grease the threads
          > that the silver focuser knob screws onto.
          >
          > True, but it doesn't hurt, and I'm thinking galling. If any trash is
          > in there, caught in the threads, this might mitigate it somewhat. (And
          > that's my rationalization for the day).
          >
          >
          > > A little is fine, but that part does not rotate, nor is it intended
          > to do so. Overgreasing just makes it messy.
          >
          > Well... self-regulating, again. What's not needed, gets squozed out.
          >
          >
          > > The other point is again with greasing, but with the thrust washers.
          > You want the bearings to carry the load, after all that's why you are
          > using them. So you do not want to put grease on the outside surfaces
          > of the washers, i.e. no grease between the brass flange and the thrust
          > washer nor between the silver focus knob and the thrust washer. What
          > you want is for the outer thrust washers to turn with the focus knob
          > and the brass flange running on the rollers. What you don't want is
          > the brass or the focus know rotating against the washer that defeats
          > the object of the mod.
          > >
          > > I seriously doubt that it will make a blind bit of difference in
          > such as lightly loaded application but it's worth thinking about.
          >
          > That's a valid point, but I agree, it won't make much difference. I
          > suppose the forced lubrication idea, with high-pressure forced
          > lubrication, oil injectors, heat exchangers, etc. which I was planning
          > for Mark III, is right out then...
          >
          >
          > > Lastly I did not spot one, but it would be worth while including a
          > mention that scopes above 10" have a spring that carries some of the
          > mirror weight. I think it is all scopes that have a locking bolt, but
          > to be honest I'm not totally 100% sure. If you lift off the focus rod
          > on such a scope, the mirror with move forward and it takes a bit of
          > fishing to hook it again. Best is to move the mirror back and insert
          > the locking bolt before removing the focuser assembly.
          >
          > I think that varies with model and year. My 12" GPS does not have a
          > spring, for example, and the last focus movement should be done CCW to
          > "push" the mirror away. On my scope, with the tube more or less level,
          > the mirror stays where it's put when I pull or push that rod.
          >
          > You're right, I probably should add something to make people at least
          > aware of that spring, but I don't know which models had it and when.
          > Given the current instructions, I don't think it's going to jeopardize
          > the job if people find there's a spring in there.
          >
          > Something I didn't want to put in the instructions because I thought
          > people might just get in trouble was, when moving the rod to
          > distribute the grease, it doesn't hurt to wiggle the rod
          > circumferentially too, to spread the grease around, as well as along,
          > the baffle tube. Can't hurt -- unless you shove the rod around so far
          > that you have to do something strange to get it back again.
          >
          >
          > > That's my 2 pennyworth...
          > > what do you think
          >
          > You know what I think? I think this is a much friendlier group, at
          > least in terms of this stuff, than LX200GPS. I posted the exact same
          > announcement there, and immediately drew flames from The Other Guy's
          > true believers.
          >
          > The funny thing is, I had discussed this mod the night before with one
          > of the leading lights of Meadedom. Here's part of the conversation:
          >
          > ===============
          >
          > > > You realize of course that a certain someone is going to pick this to
          > > > pieces (or
          > > > actually not "him"....it will be a whole bunch of cronies that he will
          > > > have posting all
          > > > sorts of remarks about this); at any rate you have done well and
          > > > presented some very
          > > > vital information; also like the needle bearing kit.
          >
          >
          > > Yup. I've seen this before -- the guru worship syndrome -- in just
          > about every hobby.
          >
          > ================
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > > Andy
          >
          > Thanks, Andy. I appreciate your comments.
          >
          > Pete
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • plalbrecht
          Hi, Andy. ... far due to other things intruding, but one day I ll finish it :-) ... ends on the back of the scope without drilling it, got a couple of ideas
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi, Andy.

            > I'm working on a simple electric focuser at the moment, not got very
            far due to other things intruding, but one day I'll finish it :-)
            > Biggest problem is finding some way to mount the various odds and
            ends on the back of the scope without drilling it, got a couple of
            ideas but nothing in metal as yet.

            Well, that's just it. If one could take the scope apart (without
            destroying the tube orthogonality) and just machine the back end flat,
            and put in some threads or inserts, problem solved. Professional
            observatory scopes such as a few I've used in college were made that
            way to carry heavy spectrographs, photometers, plate cameras (before
            CCDs), etc. Even for the Meades, it would make a lot of sense in terms
            of hanging heavy equipment on the back, or counterweights. Or, instead
            of trapping rear counterweights under the visual back, have threaded
            holes around the periphery of the rear cell to take "arcs" of steel
            counterweights. Like this.
            http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Nova/8874/whattel.gif
            or
            http://www.astro.washington.edu/morgan/MRO/home.page/mro.gph/tel.from.north.jpeg
            or
            http://www.chara.gsu.edu/HLCO/bnc16/
            (that's a twin of "my" old college scope)

            No, I haven't machined mine either. Too scary.


            > The other project that is on the books is my own set of acc. rails -
            like the focuser the comercial products are way overpriced for what is
            a couple of brackets and a rod or two. It's also a nice easy machine
            project as well. I don't have anything to hang on scope rails at the
            moment, well not until I make the cannon FD lens adaptor - these
            'little' jobs keep cropping up :-) , so rails are on the back burner
            for the moment.

            I can machine all this stuff myself, and I can send it out for
            anodizing, but looking at the price of the Losmandy rails, it's not
            worth my time, and cost of aluminum stock, to try to make that myself.
            Now, the stuff that clamps ONTO those rails, I think I can do better,
            cheaper, myself and I've done just that. Make a long bar of the
            dovetail clamp stuff, chop off lengths as needed, and finish.

            I made some ring mounts for an ETX as a finderscope. Not sure if these
            links are going to work, but I posted images to photos section of the
            LX200 GPS yahoo group:

            http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/LX200GPS/photos/view/d016?b=14
            and
            http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/LX200GPS/photos/view/d016?b=15


            Pete
          • Charles Biro
            When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I ve got a 10 year old LX-10 8 that I inherited when my father passed away, and it s sat idle
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I've got a 10
              year old LX-10 8" that I inherited when my father passed away, and it's sat
              idle for spans of 1-2 years in between uses. It's getting 1-2 times weekly
              use for the last 4 months, now, however. i am really liking the scope,
              though the image shift is about to drive me batty. (I read your earlier
              post, and followed the link to your site and removed the coarse focus knob
              and pushed and pulled the mirror it's full travel length *many* times. The
              sound coming from the scope while it was sliding sounded a bit....
              sandy/scrapey to me... (sorry for the lack of scientific terms here).. the
              movement was smooth... just sounded kind of raspy. The scope itself seems
              to be in otherwise great shape, especially considering it's light usage by
              my father. Heck, it's almost pristine. I am most likely going to get the
              zero image shift focuser for it at some point, and I haven't had a chance to
              try the scope since attempting to redistribute the grease.. (thank you,
              Ernesto for the many cloudy nights.. sigh)..

              In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go through,
              assuming it's working pretty much correctly?

              -CJ
            • plalbrecht
              ... through, ... Hi, Charles. I won t pretend to give advice on re-greasing that because I ve never had occasion to go in there. You have to remove the
              Message 6 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Biro" <cbiro@...> wrote:
                >
                > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced?

                > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go
                through,
                > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?


                Hi, Charles.

                I won't pretend to give advice on re-greasing that because I've never
                had occasion to go in there. You have to remove the corrector plate.
                If you feel you can handle that, then it's _probably_ (I won't swear
                to it) a fairly obvious procedure.

                Is there a dealer near you with a service dept. that you trust?

                Or, you can ask Doc Clay Sherrod who's also active here. He da man.


                Pete
              • Charles Biro
                Yeah, I am thinking that Doc and I will schedule a visit. I was going to do that earlier, but ran into some financial issues which forced me to postpone a
                Message 7 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yeah, I am thinking that Doc and I will schedule a visit. I was going to do
                  that earlier, but ran into some financial issues which forced me to postpone
                  a supercharge. There was a break in the clouds this evening, so I took the
                  opportunity to set up the scope for a quick looksee. w/ a 12.4mm eyepiece,
                  the image shift is lessened, but still noticable. However, I do appear to
                  have reduced the slop a bit and can achieve a slightly better focus. Hard to
                  say for sure with such a short trial run. As for local dealers, there's one
                  telescope shop that deals in Meade gear, but, I expect if I am going to go
                  to all that trouble, I'll end up shipping it to Doc or to Meade directly. I
                  am just unsure as to the 'scheduled' maintenance a 10 year old LX-10 should
                  receive. I want to take proper care of the scope, I just have no idea what's
                  'proper'.

                  -CJ

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "plalbrecht" <plalbrecht@...>
                  To: <Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, September 01, 2006 9:33 PM
                  Subject: Re: [MeadeUncensored] Focuser: cheaper upgrade kit, better upgrade
                  kit, instruct


                  --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Biro" <cbiro@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced?

                  > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go
                  through,
                  > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?


                  Hi, Charles.

                  I won't pretend to give advice on re-greasing that because I've never
                  had occasion to go in there. You have to remove the corrector plate.
                  If you feel you can handle that, then it's _probably_ (I won't swear
                  to it) a fairly obvious procedure.

                  Is there a dealer near you with a service dept. that you trust?

                  Or, you can ask Doc Clay Sherrod who's also active here. He da man.


                  Pete
                • plalbrecht
                  ... appear to ... Hard to ... You ll never get rid of the slop entirely. It s caused by the clearance between the mirror s sliding tube and the fixed baffle,
                  Message 8 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Biro" <cbiro@...> wrote:
                    > w/ a 12.4mm eyepiece,
                    > the image shift is lessened, but still noticable. However, I do
                    appear to
                    > have reduced the slop a bit and can achieve a slightly better focus.
                    Hard to
                    > say for sure with such a short trial run.


                    You'll never get rid of the slop entirely. It's caused by the
                    clearance between the mirror's sliding tube and the fixed baffle,
                    which can never be zero.

                    Remember your last focusing move should be to take up play between the
                    screw and the pin. That's _usually_ counterclockwise (you've seen how
                    the mechanism works, if you think about it, counterclockwise on the
                    knob "pushes" the screw farther into the telescope and therefore
                    pushes the mirror forward). If your scope is the kind with a helper
                    spring pushing the mirror forward, you may want to turn it clockwise
                    as a final move.

                    There's one more thing you can try, and I didn't put this in the notes
                    because I thought it was a bit risky. You can take the mechanism off
                    again, and do the push-pull thing again, but also add another motion:
                    try turning the pin a bit, so you distribute whatever grease is in
                    there around the tube, not just along it.

                    The reason I didn't mention that was because I was afraid people would
                    lose track of the pin if it rotated well clear of the hole, then
                    they'd have to go fishing for it. You can't turn it very far, but it
                    might help a little.

                    Here's another thought. When you pull the mirror all the way back
                    (turn focuser all the way clockwise) and look in the front of the
                    scope, what do you see on the baffle tube? Anything odd? Globs of
                    grease? No grease? Anything?


                    Pete
                  • John Mahony
                    I ve never heard of an SCT that _needed_ regreasing of the baffle tube, and that includes scopes that are 30+ years old. However many have replaced the grease
                    Message 9 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I've never heard of an SCT that _needed_ regreasing of the baffle tube, and
                      that includes scopes that are 30+ years old. However many have replaced the
                      grease with a thicker grease in an attempt to reduce the play between the
                      baffle tube and slider tube (the "slider" tube is the one the mirror is mounted
                      on). Dow Corning high-vacuum grease is most commonly recommended for this.
                      $15 at
                      <http://vwrlabshop.com/product.asp?pn=0013100&bhcd2=1157166775>
                      Many members of the SCT-user yahoo group have done this.

                      The only maintenance I've ever needed on my 10 year old LX10, besides normal
                      stuff like collimation and cleaning, is adjusting the dec clutch. That's
                      covered in the manual.

                      Actually I've done a few other things, but most of them were just "fine-tuning"
                      that weren't strictly necessary- I just like tinkering with scopes. Browse
                      through the LX10 yahoogroup messages and you'll see the particulars.

                      -John


                      --- Charles Biro <cbiro@...> wrote:

                      > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I've got a 10
                      > year old LX-10 8" that I inherited when my father passed away, and it's sat
                      > idle for spans of 1-2 years in between uses. It's getting 1-2 times weekly
                      > use for the last 4 months, now, however. i am really liking the scope,
                      > though the image shift is about to drive me batty. (I read your earlier
                      > post, and followed the link to your site and removed the coarse focus knob
                      > and pushed and pulled the mirror it's full travel length *many* times. The
                      > sound coming from the scope while it was sliding sounded a bit....
                      > sandy/scrapey to me... (sorry for the lack of scientific terms here).. the
                      > movement was smooth... just sounded kind of raspy. The scope itself seems
                      > to be in otherwise great shape, especially considering it's light usage by
                      > my father. Heck, it's almost pristine. I am most likely going to get the
                      > zero image shift focuser for it at some point, and I haven't had a chance to
                      > try the scope since attempting to redistribute the grease.. (thank you,
                      > Ernesto for the many cloudy nights.. sigh)..
                      >
                      > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go through,
                      > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?
                      >
                      > -CJ
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      __________________________________________________
                      Do You Yahoo!?
                      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                      http://mail.yahoo.com
                    • WarpedCorp
                      Here s another side to this issue... My SC8 is working perfectly (knock on wood)... smooth focusing, great viewing, almost no coma. I did add a external
                      Message 10 of 18 , Sep 1, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Here's another side to this issue...

                        My SC8 is working perfectly (knock on wood)... smooth focusing, great viewing, almost no coma. I did add a external rotating crayford focuser with JMI moto focus for fine focus control - works great!

                        Anyway, I'd like to get inside the OTA to darken the innards but I can't for the life of me get the mirror cell or the corrector cell to release from the OTA. I can't even get the corrector plate to come out of the cell after removing the retaining ring and all the screws. They must have superglued this thing together. I'm tempted to get the heat gun and try heating up the corrector cell rim a bit to see if that will help release. I've seen "sticky" cells before, but this one is solid.

                        Any ideas - besides leave well enough alone?

                        warp

                        John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                        I've never heard of an SCT that _needed_ regreasing of the baffle tube, and
                        that includes scopes that are 30+ years old. However many have replaced the
                        grease with a thicker grease in an attempt to reduce the play between the
                        baffle tube and slider tube (the "slider" tube is the one the mirror is mounted
                        on). Dow Corning high-vacuum grease is most commonly recommended for this.
                        $15 at
                        <http://vwrlabshop.com/product.asp?pn=0013100&bhcd2=1157166775>
                        Many members of the SCT-user yahoo group have done this.

                        The only maintenance I've ever needed on my 10 year old LX10, besides normal
                        stuff like collimation and cleaning, is adjusting the dec clutch. That's
                        covered in the manual.

                        Actually I've done a few other things, but most of them were just "fine-tuning"
                        that weren't strictly necessary- I just like tinkering with scopes. Browse
                        through the LX10 yahoogroup messages and you'll see the particulars.

                        -John


                        --- Charles Biro <cbiro@...> wrote:

                        > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I've got a 10
                        > year old LX-10 8" that I inherited when my father passed away, and it's sat
                        > idle for spans of 1-2 years in between uses. It's getting 1-2 times weekly
                        > use for the last 4 months, now, however. i am really liking the scope,
                        > though the image shift is about to drive me batty. (I read your earlier
                        > post, and followed the link to your site and removed the coarse focus knob
                        > and pushed and pulled the mirror it's full travel length *many* times. The
                        > sound coming from the scope while it was sliding sounded a bit....
                        > sandy/scrapey to me... (sorry for the lack of scientific terms here).. the
                        > movement was smooth... just sounded kind of raspy. The scope itself seems
                        > to be in otherwise great shape, especially considering it's light usage by
                        > my father. Heck, it's almost pristine. I am most likely going to get the
                        > zero image shift focuser for it at some point, and I haven't had a chance to
                        > try the scope since attempting to redistribute the grease.. (thank you,
                        > Ernesto for the many cloudy nights.. sigh)..
                        >
                        > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go through,
                        > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?
                        >
                        > -CJ
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        __________________________________________________
                        Do You Yahoo!?
                        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                        http://mail.yahoo.com





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Andy Eskelson
                        I ve never done this on my lx200, but the various web sites indicate that there are cork spacers around the edge. I wonder if your scope is the same and that
                        Message 11 of 18 , Sep 2, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I've never done this on my lx200, but the various web sites indicate that there are cork spacers around the edge. I wonder if your scope is the same and that they are wedging the corrector into the recess. If so perhaps gently removing (or trying to) these spacers may free things up.


                          Andy

                          On Fri, 1 Sep 2006 21:35:41 -0700 (PDT)
                          WarpedCorp <warpcorp@...> wrote:

                          > Here's another side to this issue...
                          >
                          > My SC8 is working perfectly (knock on wood)... smooth focusing, great viewing, almost no coma. I did add a external rotating crayford focuser with JMI moto focus for fine focus control - works great!
                          >
                          > Anyway, I'd like to get inside the OTA to darken the innards but I can't for the life of me get the mirror cell or the corrector cell to release from the OTA. I can't even get the corrector plate to come out of the cell after removing the retaining ring and all the screws. They must have superglued this thing together. I'm tempted to get the heat gun and try heating up the corrector cell rim a bit to see if that will help release. I've seen "sticky" cells before, but this one is solid.
                          >
                          > Any ideas - besides leave well enough alone?
                          >
                          > warp
                          >
                          > John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                          > I've never heard of an SCT that _needed_ regreasing of the baffle tube, and
                          > that includes scopes that are 30+ years old. However many have replaced the
                          > grease with a thicker grease in an attempt to reduce the play between the
                          > baffle tube and slider tube (the "slider" tube is the one the mirror is mounted
                          > on). Dow Corning high-vacuum grease is most commonly recommended for this.
                          > $15 at
                          > <http://vwrlabshop.com/product.asp?pn=0013100&bhcd2=1157166775>
                          > Many members of the SCT-user yahoo group have done this.
                          >
                          > The only maintenance I've ever needed on my 10 year old LX10, besides normal
                          > stuff like collimation and cleaning, is adjusting the dec clutch. That's
                          > covered in the manual.
                          >
                          > Actually I've done a few other things, but most of them were just "fine-tuning"
                          > that weren't strictly necessary- I just like tinkering with scopes. Browse
                          > through the LX10 yahoogroup messages and you'll see the particulars.
                          >
                          > -John
                          >
                          >
                          > --- Charles Biro <cbiro@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I've got a 10
                          > > year old LX-10 8" that I inherited when my father passed away, and it's sat
                          > > idle for spans of 1-2 years in between uses. It's getting 1-2 times weekly
                          > > use for the last 4 months, now, however. i am really liking the scope,
                          > > though the image shift is about to drive me batty. (I read your earlier
                          > > post, and followed the link to your site and removed the coarse focus knob
                          > > and pushed and pulled the mirror it's full travel length *many* times. The
                          > > sound coming from the scope while it was sliding sounded a bit....
                          > > sandy/scrapey to me... (sorry for the lack of scientific terms here).. the
                          > > movement was smooth... just sounded kind of raspy. The scope itself seems
                          > > to be in otherwise great shape, especially considering it's light usage by
                          > > my father. Heck, it's almost pristine. I am most likely going to get the
                          > > zero image shift focuser for it at some point, and I haven't had a chance to
                          > > try the scope since attempting to redistribute the grease.. (thank you,
                          > > Ernesto for the many cloudy nights.. sigh)..
                          > >
                          > > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go through,
                          > > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?
                          > >
                          > > -CJ
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          > __________________________________________________
                          > Do You Yahoo!?
                          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                          > http://mail.yahoo.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                        • John Mahony
                          A common method is to use wooden popsickle sticks to pry a stuck corrector loose. The cells themselves are often glued to the tube. It s rarely, if ever,
                          Message 12 of 18 , Sep 2, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            A common method is to use wooden popsickle sticks to pry a stuck corrector
                            loose.

                            The cells themselves are often glued to the tube. It's rarely, if ever,
                            necessary to remove them.

                            -John


                            --- Andy Eskelson <andyyahoo@...> wrote:

                            > I've never done this on my lx200, but the various web sites indicate that
                            > there are cork spacers around the edge. I wonder if your scope is the same
                            > and that they are wedging the corrector into the recess. If so perhaps gently
                            > removing (or trying to) these spacers may free things up.
                            >
                            >
                            > Andy
                            >
                            > On Fri, 1 Sep 2006 21:35:41 -0700 (PDT)
                            > WarpedCorp <warpcorp@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > Here's another side to this issue...
                            > >
                            > > My SC8 is working perfectly (knock on wood)... smooth focusing, great
                            > viewing, almost no coma. I did add a external rotating crayford focuser with
                            > JMI moto focus for fine focus control - works great!
                            > >
                            > > Anyway, I'd like to get inside the OTA to darken the innards but I can't
                            > for the life of me get the mirror cell or the corrector cell to release from
                            > the OTA. I can't even get the corrector plate to come out of the cell after
                            > removing the retaining ring and all the screws. They must have superglued
                            > this thing together. I'm tempted to get the heat gun and try heating up the
                            > corrector cell rim a bit to see if that will help release. I've seen
                            > "sticky" cells before, but this one is solid.
                            > >
                            > > Any ideas - besides leave well enough alone?
                            > >
                            > > warp
                            > >
                            > > John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                            > > I've never heard of an SCT that _needed_ regreasing of the baffle
                            > tube, and
                            > > that includes scopes that are 30+ years old. However many have replaced the
                            > > grease with a thicker grease in an attempt to reduce the play between the
                            > > baffle tube and slider tube (the "slider" tube is the one the mirror is
                            > mounted
                            > > on). Dow Corning high-vacuum grease is most commonly recommended for this.
                            > > $15 at
                            > > <http://vwrlabshop.com/product.asp?pn=0013100&bhcd2=1157166775>
                            > > Many members of the SCT-user yahoo group have done this.
                            > >
                            > > The only maintenance I've ever needed on my 10 year old LX10, besides
                            > normal
                            > > stuff like collimation and cleaning, is adjusting the dec clutch. That's
                            > > covered in the manual.
                            > >
                            > > Actually I've done a few other things, but most of them were just
                            > "fine-tuning"
                            > > that weren't strictly necessary- I just like tinkering with scopes. Browse
                            > > through the LX10 yahoogroup messages and you'll see the particulars.
                            > >
                            > > -John
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- Charles Biro <cbiro@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I've got a
                            > 10
                            > > > year old LX-10 8" that I inherited when my father passed away, and it's
                            > sat
                            > > > idle for spans of 1-2 years in between uses. It's getting 1-2 times
                            > weekly
                            > > > use for the last 4 months, now, however. i am really liking the scope,
                            > > > though the image shift is about to drive me batty. (I read your earlier
                            > > > post, and followed the link to your site and removed the coarse focus
                            > knob
                            > > > and pushed and pulled the mirror it's full travel length *many* times.
                            > The
                            > > > sound coming from the scope while it was sliding sounded a bit....
                            > > > sandy/scrapey to me... (sorry for the lack of scientific terms here)..
                            > the
                            > > > movement was smooth... just sounded kind of raspy. The scope itself seems
                            >
                            > > > to be in otherwise great shape, especially considering it's light usage
                            > by
                            > > > my father. Heck, it's almost pristine. I am most likely going to get the
                            > > > zero image shift focuser for it at some point, and I haven't had a chance
                            > to
                            > > > try the scope since attempting to redistribute the grease.. (thank you,
                            > > > Ernesto for the many cloudy nights.. sigh)..
                            > > >
                            > > > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go
                            > through,
                            > > > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?
                            > > >
                            > > > -CJ
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > > __________________________________________________
                            > > Do You Yahoo!?
                            > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                            > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            __________________________________________________
                            Do You Yahoo!?
                            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                            http://mail.yahoo.com
                          • Andy Eskelson
                            Hi Pete, I m surprised at your comments regarding the cost of stock compared to the Lom. rails I guess that we pay quite a bit more here in the UK From our
                            Message 13 of 18 , Sep 2, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hi Pete,

                              I'm surprised at your comments regarding the cost of stock compared to the Lom. rails
                              I guess that we pay quite a bit more here in the UK

                              From our main meade dealer, AC243 Parallel rail ring mounting with 5 inch rings is 175 GBP
                              a good 300+ USD - also the alu stock is not too expensive. I've not searched for the Lom price here in the UK.

                              I like the plates on the scope pics? yes thats what we need all right :-)

                              What I have been mulling over is to machine up a block, which would form part of a rail system as well. If it was about 1/2 inch thick milled in a curve to match the scope with a step in it so that it coulds fit between the rail mounting screws and come flush to the back of the scope, obviously two would be needed one top and bottom. The edge could then be drilled and tapped to provide somewhere to attach a plate which you could wrap around the edge of the cell.

                              Come to think about it you could even extend the blocks so that you could clear the lump in the centre of the back cell, all it would need is a hole for the eyepiece connector about 2 inches and a hole for the focus knob - now that wuld give plenty of mounting possibilities.

                              Would need a couple of counterbalance weights on the front end, and perhaps an extension for the focus knob but that's not a problem.

                              I think I rather like this idea... it's simple.

                              Ascii art :


                              x x
                              wwwfffwwwwwwwwww x x wwwwwwwwwwwwww
                              bb x x bb
                              bb xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx bb
                              bb x x bb
                              bbxxxxxx xxxxxxbb
                              bbx xbb
                              bbx xbb
                              bbx xbb
                              bx xb
                              x x

                              x = scope outline
                              b = machined block
                              w = plate
                              f = hole for focus knob



                              Andy


                              On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 22:26:59 -0000
                              "plalbrecht" <plalbrecht@...> wrote:

                              > Hi, Andy.
                              >
                              > > I'm working on a simple electric focuser at the moment, not got very
                              > far due to other things intruding, but one day I'll finish it :-)
                              > > Biggest problem is finding some way to mount the various odds and
                              > ends on the back of the scope without drilling it, got a couple of
                              > ideas but nothing in metal as yet.
                              >
                              > Well, that's just it. If one could take the scope apart (without
                              > destroying the tube orthogonality) and just machine the back end flat,
                              > and put in some threads or inserts, problem solved. Professional
                              > observatory scopes such as a few I've used in college were made that
                              > way to carry heavy spectrographs, photometers, plate cameras (before
                              > CCDs), etc. Even for the Meades, it would make a lot of sense in terms
                              > of hanging heavy equipment on the back, or counterweights. Or, instead
                              > of trapping rear counterweights under the visual back, have threaded
                              > holes around the periphery of the rear cell to take "arcs" of steel
                              > counterweights. Like this.
                              > http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Nova/8874/whattel.gif
                              > or
                              > http://www.astro.washington.edu/morgan/MRO/home.page/mro.gph/tel.from.north.jpeg
                              > or
                              > http://www.chara.gsu.edu/HLCO/bnc16/
                              > (that's a twin of "my" old college scope)
                              >
                              > No, I haven't machined mine either. Too scary.
                              >
                              >
                              > > The other project that is on the books is my own set of acc. rails -
                              > like the focuser the comercial products are way overpriced for what is
                              > a couple of brackets and a rod or two. It's also a nice easy machine
                              > project as well. I don't have anything to hang on scope rails at the
                              > moment, well not until I make the cannon FD lens adaptor - these
                              > 'little' jobs keep cropping up :-) , so rails are on the back burner
                              > for the moment.
                              >
                              > I can machine all this stuff myself, and I can send it out for
                              > anodizing, but looking at the price of the Losmandy rails, it's not
                              > worth my time, and cost of aluminum stock, to try to make that myself.
                              > Now, the stuff that clamps ONTO those rails, I think I can do better,
                              > cheaper, myself and I've done just that. Make a long bar of the
                              > dovetail clamp stuff, chop off lengths as needed, and finish.
                              >
                              > I made some ring mounts for an ETX as a finderscope. Not sure if these
                              > links are going to work, but I posted images to photos section of the
                              > LX200 GPS yahoo group:
                              >
                              > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/LX200GPS/photos/view/d016?b=14
                              > and
                              > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/LX200GPS/photos/view/d016?b=15
                              >
                              >
                              > Pete
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            • P. Clay Sherrod
                              This is a good suggestion.....or any Teflon kitchen cake slicker, spatula or the like. NEVER use metal to break (pun intended...) the corrector free from its
                              Message 14 of 18 , Sep 2, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                This is a good suggestion.....or any Teflon kitchen cake slicker, spatula or the like.
                                NEVER use metal to break (pun intended...) the corrector free from its adhesion to the
                                cork.

                                Dr. Clay
                                -------------
                                Arkansas Sky Observatories
                                Harvard MPC/ H43 (Conway)
                                Harvard MPC/ H41 (Petit Jean Mountain)
                                Harvard MPC/ H45 (Petit Jean Mtn. South)
                                http://www.arksky.org/


                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "John Mahony" <jmmahony@...>
                                To: <Meade-Uncensored@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Saturday, September 02, 2006 4:00 PM
                                Subject: Re: [MeadeUncensored] Focuser: cheaper upgrade kit, better upgrade kit,
                                instruct


                                >A common method is to use wooden popsickle sticks to pry a stuck corrector
                                > loose.
                                >
                                > The cells themselves are often glued to the tube. It's rarely, if ever,
                                > necessary to remove them.
                                >
                                > -John
                                >
                                >
                                > --- Andy Eskelson <andyyahoo@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >> I've never done this on my lx200, but the various web sites indicate that
                                >> there are cork spacers around the edge. I wonder if your scope is the same
                                >> and that they are wedging the corrector into the recess. If so perhaps gently
                                >> removing (or trying to) these spacers may free things up.
                                >>
                                >>
                                >> Andy
                                >>
                                >> On Fri, 1 Sep 2006 21:35:41 -0700 (PDT)
                                >> WarpedCorp <warpcorp@...> wrote:
                                >>
                                >> > Here's another side to this issue...
                                >> >
                                >> > My SC8 is working perfectly (knock on wood)... smooth focusing, great
                                >> viewing, almost no coma. I did add a external rotating crayford focuser with
                                >> JMI moto focus for fine focus control - works great!
                                >> >
                                >> > Anyway, I'd like to get inside the OTA to darken the innards but I can't
                                >> for the life of me get the mirror cell or the corrector cell to release from
                                >> the OTA. I can't even get the corrector plate to come out of the cell after
                                >> removing the retaining ring and all the screws. They must have superglued
                                >> this thing together. I'm tempted to get the heat gun and try heating up the
                                >> corrector cell rim a bit to see if that will help release. I've seen
                                >> "sticky" cells before, but this one is solid.
                                >> >
                                >> > Any ideas - besides leave well enough alone?
                                >> >
                                >> > warp
                                >> >
                                >> > John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                                >> > I've never heard of an SCT that _needed_ regreasing of the baffle
                                >> tube, and
                                >> > that includes scopes that are 30+ years old. However many have replaced the
                                >> > grease with a thicker grease in an attempt to reduce the play between the
                                >> > baffle tube and slider tube (the "slider" tube is the one the mirror is
                                >> mounted
                                >> > on). Dow Corning high-vacuum grease is most commonly recommended for this.
                                >> > $15 at
                                >> > <http://vwrlabshop.com/product.asp?pn=0013100&bhcd2=1157166775>
                                >> > Many members of the SCT-user yahoo group have done this.
                                >> >
                                >> > The only maintenance I've ever needed on my 10 year old LX10, besides
                                >> normal
                                >> > stuff like collimation and cleaning, is adjusting the dec clutch. That's
                                >> > covered in the manual.
                                >> >
                                >> > Actually I've done a few other things, but most of them were just
                                >> "fine-tuning"
                                >> > that weren't strictly necessary- I just like tinkering with scopes. Browse
                                >> > through the LX10 yahoogroup messages and you'll see the particulars.
                                >> >
                                >> > -John
                                >> >
                                >> >
                                >> > --- Charles Biro <cbiro@...> wrote:
                                >> >
                                >> > > When, if ever, should a scope have the grease inside replaced? I've got a
                                >> 10
                                >> > > year old LX-10 8" that I inherited when my father passed away, and it's
                                >> sat
                                >> > > idle for spans of 1-2 years in between uses. It's getting 1-2 times
                                >> weekly
                                >> > > use for the last 4 months, now, however. i am really liking the scope,
                                >> > > though the image shift is about to drive me batty. (I read your earlier
                                >> > > post, and followed the link to your site and removed the coarse focus
                                >> knob
                                >> > > and pushed and pulled the mirror it's full travel length *many* times.
                                >> The
                                >> > > sound coming from the scope while it was sliding sounded a bit....
                                >> > > sandy/scrapey to me... (sorry for the lack of scientific terms here)..
                                >> the
                                >> > > movement was smooth... just sounded kind of raspy. The scope itself seems
                                >>
                                >> > > to be in otherwise great shape, especially considering it's light usage
                                >> by
                                >> > > my father. Heck, it's almost pristine. I am most likely going to get the
                                >> > > zero image shift focuser for it at some point, and I haven't had a chance
                                >> to
                                >> > > try the scope since attempting to redistribute the grease.. (thank you,
                                >> > > Ernesto for the many cloudy nights.. sigh)..
                                >> > >
                                >> > > In any event... what sort of maintenance for a scope of this age go
                                >> through,
                                >> > > assuming it's working pretty much correctly?
                                >> > >
                                >> > > -CJ
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> > >
                                >> >
                                >> > __________________________________________________
                                >> > Do You Yahoo!?
                                >> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                >> > http://mail.yahoo.com
                                >> >
                                >> >
                                >> >
                                >> >
                                >> >
                                >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >> >
                                >> >
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >>
                                >
                                >
                                > __________________________________________________
                                > Do You Yahoo!?
                                > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                > http://mail.yahoo.com
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.