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New Interview With Kent Hovind!

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  • Robert Baty
    See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3yw1CO00oo&feature=youtu.be
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 24, 2014
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      See: 

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3yw1CO00oo&feature=youtu.be

      -----------------------------------------
    • bucksburg
      What good would a halfway house do Kent Hovind? He took a vow of poverty, so he can t work. Halfway houses are only for people who work. Mr. Buck
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 25, 2014
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        What good would a halfway house do Kent Hovind? He took a vow of poverty, so he can't work.
        Halfway houses are only for people who work.
        Mr. Buck
      • Robert Baty
        Buck, I think it will be interesting to see how Kent does under the 3 years probation that was ordered. He will be expected to work, as I understand it, and
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 25, 2014
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          Buck,

          I think it will be interesting to see how Kent does under the 3 years probation that was ordered.  He will be expected to work, as I understand it, and probably start making payments on his tax debts.  He may not be allowed to take just any ol' job (i.e., preachin' creation science).

          Gea has posted a note indicating that Kent is planning to be teaching in a creation school once he gets out and she's taking applications now.

          Apparently that criminal contempt issue is being considered quite slowly; no new developments.  That could extend his time; one of the arguments being that more time is the only sanction that would have an effect on Kent.

          Sincerely,
          Robert Baty



          To: Maury_and_Baty@yahoogroups.com
          From: bucksburg@...
          Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2014 13:48:57 -0800
          Subject: [M & B] RE: New Interview With Kent Hovind!

           
          What good would a halfway house do Kent Hovind? He took a vow of poverty, so he can't work.
          Halfway houses are only for people who work.
          Mr. Buck

        • bucksburg
          The communists in Russia, and now China, came up with the idea to sentence a political prisoner to a few years, and then indefinitely keep extending the
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 25, 2014
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            The communists in Russia, and now China, came up with the idea to sentence a political prisoner to a few years, and then indefinitely keep extending the sentence in hopes that the prisoner will realize that the only path to freedom is a change of philosophy.

            That's what is being proposed here.

            Mr. Buck
          • Robert Baty
            Buck, That is not what is being proposed here. That Kent has never forsaken his criminal interests is one reason, and reasonably so, that he took the worst
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 25, 2014
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              Buck,

              That is not what is being proposed here.

              That Kent has never forsaken his criminal interests is one reason, and reasonably so, that he took the worst case scenario, as did his father Greg Dixon before him, and both were able to exploit their alleged martydoms as a result.

              If Kent gets more time, it won't be because of his philosophy, but rather his overt criminal behavior (i.e., contempt, for example, relating to his activities thwarting, for now, the sale of forfeited property).

              Sincerely,
              Robert Baty


              To: Maury_and_Baty@yahoogroups.com
              From: bucksburg@...
              Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2014 14:20:55 -0800
              Subject: RE: [M & B] RE: New Interview With Kent Hovind!

               
              The communists in Russia, and now China, came up with the idea to sentence a political prisoner to a few years, and then indefinitely keep extending the sentence in hopes that the prisoner will realize that the only path to freedom is a change of philosophy.

              That's what is being proposed here.

              Mr. Buck

            • piasanaol
              From: bucksburg The communists in Russia, and now China, came up with the idea to sentence a political prisoner to a few years, and then indefinitely keep
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 25, 2014
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                From: bucksburg
                The communists in Russia, and now China, came up with the idea to sentence a political prisoner to a few years, and then indefinitely keep extending the sentence in hopes that the prisoner will realize that the only path to freedom is a change of philosophy.

                That's what is being proposed here.

                Mr. Buck

                 
                 
                 
                Pi:
                That's simply not true.  Hovind is not a political prisoner.  He's a liar, fraud, and crook.  His son Eric is having no trouble at all with the government.  Of course Eric, unlike his father, is obeying the law.
                 
                The reason they're considering extending Kent Hovind's stay is that he is filing repeated frivolous actions in an ongoing effort to prevent the government from selling the properties seized in order to pay part of his tax obligations.
              • bucksburg
                Well, I don t want to get into a discussion about this, but obviously it s criminal activity that the political prisoners in China were convicted of. Anything
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 26, 2014
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                  Well, I don't want to get into a discussion about this, but obviously it's criminal activity that the political prisoners in China were convicted of.

                  Anything the police state disallows is criminal activity.

                  According to a recent study, the average American commits a statistical total of three federal felonies a day.
                  http://www.amazon.com/Three-Felonies-Day-Target-Innocent/dp/1594035229
                  Mr. Buck
                • Robert Baty
                  Buck, That s kinda funny how you have parrotted Kent s use of the 3 felonies a day thing. I suppose it could be said that political ideas/activities may be
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 26, 2014
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                    Buck,

                    That's kinda funny how you have parrotted Kent's use of the "3 felonies a day" thing.

                    I suppose it could be said that political ideas/activities may be criminalized, it is not political activity/ideas that got Kent Hovind in trouble as far as his incarceration and personal income tax problems.

                    Really, Buck, you aren't trying to maintain the analogy between political prisoners in places like China and Kent Hovind, are you?

                    Really, are you?

                    Sincerely,
                    Robert Baty


                    To: Maury_and_Baty@yahoogroups.com
                    From: bucksburg@...
                    Date: Wed, 26 Feb 2014 11:21:20 -0800
                    Subject: RE: [M & B] RE: New Interview With Kent Hovind!

                     
                    Well, I don't want to get into a discussion about this, but obviously it's criminal activity that the political prisoners in China were convicted of.

                    Anything the police state disallows is criminal activity.

                    According to a recent study, the average American commits a statistical total of three federal felonies a day.
                    http://www.amazon.com/Three-Felonies-Day-Target-Innocent/dp/1594035229
                    Mr. Buck
                  • bucksburg
                    I said my piece, and I stand by what I said. There s no point in discussing it with someone who disagrees. Mr. Buck
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 26, 2014
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                      I said my piece, and I stand by what I said. There's no point in discussing it with someone who disagrees.

                      Mr. Buck
                    • piasanaol
                      Mr. Buck: Well, I don t want to get into a discussion about this, but obviously it s criminal activity that the political prisoners in China were convicted of.
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 26, 2014
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                        Mr. Buck:
                        Well, I don't want to get into a discussion about this, but obviously it's criminal activity that the political prisoners in China were convicted of.
                         
                         
                        Pi:
                        I can understand not wanting to discuss this.  If you did, you'd have to go all the way back to Hovind's perjury on his bankruptcy filing in 1996.  That's how long he has been trying to avoid paying his taxes.
                         
                         
                         
                         
                        Mr. Buck:
                        Anything the police state disallows is criminal activity.
                         
                        Pi:
                        Anything ANY state disallows is criminal activity.  That's nothing new.
                         
                         
                         
                        Mr. Buck:
                        According to a recent study, the average American commits a statistical total of three federal felonies a day.
                         
                        Pi:
                        The average American pays his taxes.  Even ministers pay taxes on their income.  Hovind thinks he's exempt.  If he had simply obeyed the rules and paid his taxes, he'd be a free man today and his ministry would be intact.  Instead, he chose to wage a decade long (at a minimum) war with the IRS lying all the way.  His actions were deliberately self-destructive.  The only sympathy he gets from here is that he did a really good job of making lemons from lemonade while serving his time.
                         
                        "Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's."
                        (Matt 22; Mark 12; Luke 20)
                         
                         
                      • bucksburg
                        Well, although I won t get into a discussion about the persecution of Kent Hovind, I will address the question of criminal activity. I said that anything
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 27, 2014
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                          Well, although I won't get into a discussion about the persecution of Kent Hovind, I will address the question of 'criminal activity.'  I said that anything the police state disallows is criminal, but I should also point out that quite a bit of what the police state allows is also criminal. The police state doesn't have the assets to go after even 10% of the crimes, nor does it care to. The important thing is that if it ever wants to go after one of the 315 criminals in the country, it has plenty to work with.

                          Furthermore, I'm not aware of any studies that indicate that the average American--or any American, for that matter--does pay all his taxes. Certainly the last few appointees to run the Treasury Department didn't stand up very well to scrutiny. The tax code is so many feet high (and I speak just of the federal code) that the average American certainly can't be expected to know what it says. Therefore, how can he be expected to follow its every jot and tittle? The average American has no idea whether or not he is liable for tax on the nickel poker game he won, or the knicknack he purchased along the road on his last trip to Florida.
                        • Robert Baty
                          There s no need for a discussion about the persecution of Kent Hovind . The federal government has not been, is not persecuting Kent Hovind. However, typical
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 27, 2014
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                            There's no need for a discussion "about the persecution of Kent Hovind".

                            The federal government has not been, is not persecuting Kent Hovind.

                            However, typical of the "sovereign citizen" playbook, Kent Hovind has pledged to kill as many trees as he can with his vexatious litigation, and he's doing a pretty good job at following that playbook. 

                            We'll have to wait and see what that gets Kent.  It has gotten him considered for additional time due to his frivolous efforts to thwart the sale of his forfeited properties in Flordia.  The Court has yet to act on that matter.

                            Sincerely,
                            Robert Baty


                            To: Maury_and_Baty@yahoogroups.com
                            From: bucksburg@...
                            Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2014 11:20:40 -0800
                            Subject: Re: [M & B] RE: New Interview With Kent Hovind!

                             
                            Well, although I won't get into a discussion about the persecution of Kent Hovind, I will address the question of 'criminal activity.'  I said that anything the police state disallows is criminal, but I should also point out that quite a bit of what the police state allows is also criminal. The police state doesn't have the assets to go after even 10% of the crimes, nor does it care to. The important thing is that if it ever wants to go after one of the 315 criminals in the country, it has plenty to work with.

                            Furthermore, I'm not aware of any studies that indicate that the average American--or any American, for that matter--does pay all his taxes. Certainly the last few appointees to run the Treasury Department didn't stand up very well to scrutiny. The tax code is so many feet high (and I speak just of the federal code) that the average American certainly can't be expected to know what it says. Therefore, how can he be expected to follow its every jot and tittle? The average American has no idea whether or not he is liable for tax on the nickel poker game he won, or the knicknack he purchased along the road on his last trip to Florida.

                          • piasanaol
                            Buck: Well, although I won t get into a discussion about the persecution of Kent Hovind, Pi: You misspelled prosecution. Buck: I will address the question of
                            Message 13 of 13 , Feb 27, 2014
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                              Buck:
                              Well, although I won't get into a discussion about the persecution of Kent Hovind,
                               
                              Pi:
                              You misspelled "prosecution."
                               
                               
                               
                              Buck:
                               I will address the question of 'criminal activity.'  I said that anything the police state disallows is criminal,
                               
                              Pi:
                              That is true of all states.
                               
                               
                               
                              Buck:
                               but I should also point out that quite a bit of what the police state allows is also criminal. The police state doesn't have the assets to go after even 10% of the crimes, nor does it care to. The important thing is that if it ever wants to go after one of the 315 criminals in the country, it has plenty to work with.
                               
                              Pi:
                              There are over 315,000,000 people in the US.  Surely you're not suggesting only 315 of them are criminals.
                               
                               
                               
                              Buck:
                              Furthermore, I'm not aware of any studies that indicate that the average American--or any American, for that matter--does pay all his taxes.
                               
                              Pi:
                              I'm sure not all of us pay all of our taxes.  Hovind didn't pay ANY of his taxes.  In fact, as far as I can tell, he didn't file a tax return from something like 1993 to the time of his arrest.
                               
                               
                               
                              Buck:
                               Certainly the last few appointees to run the Treasury Department didn't stand up very well to scrutiny.
                               
                              Pi:
                              And I'm all in favor of penalizing them accordingly.
                               
                               
                               
                              Buck:
                               The tax code is so many feet high (and I speak just of the federal code) that the average American certainly can't be expected to know what it says. Therefore, how can he be exp ected to follow its every jot and tittle?
                               
                              Pi:
                              The average American is fully aware that he is required to file income tax returns every year his income exceeds a certain minimum.
                               
                               
                              Buck:
                               The average American has no idea whether or not he is liable for tax on the nickel poker game he won, or the knicknack he purchased along the road on his last trip to Florida.
                               
                              Pi:
                              Gimme a break.  We're not talking about the nickel poker game.  Hovind didn't file a tax return for a dozen or more years; he dodged hundreds of thousands in taxes;  he even had tens of thousands in cash stashed in his house.

                               
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