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Fw: Re: Neal Pollard of Bear Valley replies on Maury matter!

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  • Robert Baty
    ... From: Todd S. Greene To: coCBanned@yahoogroups.com Date: Sunday, May 3, 2009 7:22 PM Subject: Re: Neal Pollard of Bear Valley replies on Maury matter! In
    Message 1 of 1 , May 3, 2009
      --------------Forwarded Message-----------

      From: Todd S. Greene
      To: coCBanned@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, May 3, 2009 7:22 PM

      Subject: Re: Neal Pollard of Bear Valley replies on Maury matter!

      In fact, "the circle of the earth" which God "sits above" (Isaiah 40:22) is actually a reference to the firmament (Hebrew: *raqia*) over the earth.

      Note that the reference is repeated, in Hebrew parallelism commonly used in the literature, right in the very next part of the verse, where it says God

      > "stretches out the heavens like
      > a curtain and spreads them out
      > like a tent to dwell in".

      http://jmm.aaa.net.au/articles/15041.htm

      I fully realize that many Christians today, in trying to support their doctrine of biblical infallibility, engage in "eisegesis" to reinterpret Bible verses based on scientific discoveries about the world.

      However, what puts the lie to this is the fact that no one ever actually used such Bible verses BEFORE the scientific discoveries.

      It's the same kind of thing as the false arguments that Nostradamus "prophesied" certain events, because if Nostradamus had *really* prophesied the events then *we would have known the events were going to occur before they occurred*.

      But, in fact, this is merely another example of people reading things into ("eisegesis") equivocally ambiguous language what is not really there in the first place.

      (This is actually another example of the problems that people using fallacious equivocal arguments with the epistemological principle of testability.)

      - Todd Greene

      --- In coCBanned@yahoogroups.com, Charles Weston <sanantonioriverman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Also, you've got to wonder, if
      > the word translated "circle"
      > actually means "sphere," then
      > why wasn't it translated as such?
      >
      > Charles Weston

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