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Quick question....

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  • terry regan
    Once one knows the prop is fouled and there s no forward thrust shouldn t the engine be shut off?? Engine had been running that day prior (enough charging
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 10, 2007
      Once one knows the prop is fouled and there's no forward thrust shouldn't the engine be shut off??  Engine had been running that day prior (enough charging batts. for vhf).  Also my experience with handhelds vhfs (which isn't much) is that they're only good if they're of a very good quality, your close to shore, there's no wind blowing and the big radio is dead.  Your thoughts on this please.   Terry


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    • Ahmet
      Well, if it is fauled already, and you can t get it loose, you may just as well charge the batteries. However, in coastal cruising, the batteries should never
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 10, 2007
        Well, if it is fauled already, and you can't get it loose, you may just as well charge the batteries.
        However, in coastal cruising, the batteries should never be so much down that you can't use the VHF. It will take many hours, for the VHF to become unusable.
        There are tricks to unfoul a line, espeically if it is a halyard, because it does not have the nots etc of lobster lines, and the end is coming up to your boat.
        If you can't pull it out by hand after putting the tranny into neutral, I would recommend to put the tranny into reverse (engine off) and then "bump the engine with the starter, at the same time keeping the fouled line snug, withotu starting the engine. Most of the time that will release a fouled halyard
         
        The two handhelds I have are useful up to about 5 miles. They are pretty good quality. The other day, I tried to use someone else's handheld, which was a cheap "special" plastci deal with no rubber duckie antenna, and the other side could not hear me. So I had use my on-board radio.
         Ahmet
        "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
        Winthrop Yach Club
        Winthrop MA
        www.sailnomad.com
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 1:20 PM
        Subject: [MassBaySailors] Quick question....

        Once one knows the prop is fouled and there's no forward thrust shouldn't the engine be shut off??  Engine had been running that day prior (enough charging batts. for vhf).  Also my experience with handhelds vhfs (which isn't much) is that they're only good if they're of a very good quality, your close to shore, there's no wind blowing and the big radio is dead.  Your thoughts on this please.   Terry


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      • Dave Belfer-Shevett
        ... You can run the engine, just don t engage the transmission. The battery charging comes from the alternator, which is not connected to the prop shaft at
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 10, 2007
          terry regan wrote:
          > Once one knows the prop is fouled and there's no forward thrust
          > shouldn't the engine be shut off?? Engine had been running that day
          > prior (enough charging batts. for vhf). Also my experience with
          > handhelds vhfs (which isn't much) is that they're only good if they're
          > of a very good quality, your close to shore, there's no wind blowing and
          > the big radio is dead. Your thoughts on this please. Terry

          You can run the engine, just don't engage the transmission. The battery
          charging comes from the alternator, which is not connected to the prop
          shaft at all. If you have a fouled prop, you can still charge and run
          your electronics, just do NOT engage the prop at all (it can cause
          amazing amounts of damage to... well, everything :)

          -dbs
        • terry regan
          At first we thought we were dragging a lobster pot. The line trailing off stern looked huge (magnified in water). It was the halyard. Something else was
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 10, 2007
            At first we thought we were dragging a lobster pot.  The line trailing off stern looked huge (magnified in water).  It was the halyard.  Something else was bumping bottom.  Not there the day after for the diver/disentanglement procedure so will never know what else may have been caught.  You could see the jib halyard pulled taut off the port side.  This wasn't noticed until the SeaTow guys pointed it out.  Adding what you said about untangling into my memory bank.  So much info in I hope it doesn't push out something crucial, like tying my shoes.  :-)
            Ahmet <SailNomad@...> wrote:
            Well, if it is fauled already, and you can't get it loose, you may just as well charge the batteries.
            However, in coastal cruising, the batteries should never be so much down that you can't use the VHF. It will take many hours, for the VHF to become unusable.
            There are tricks to unfoul a line, espeically if it is a halyard, because it does not have the nots etc of lobster lines, and the end is coming up to your boat.
            If you can't pull it out by hand after putting the tranny into neutral, I would recommend to put the tranny into reverse (engine off) and then "bump the engine with the starter, at the same time keeping the fouled line snug, withotu starting the engine. Most of the time that will release a fouled halyard
             
            The two handhelds I have are useful up to about 5 miles. They are pretty good quality. The other day, I tried to use someone else's handheld, which was a cheap "special" plastci deal with no rubber duckie antenna, and the other side could not hear me. So I had use my on-board radio.
             Ahmet
            "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
            Winthrop Yach Club
            Winthrop MA
            www.sailnomad. com
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 1:20 PM
            Subject: [MassBaySailors] Quick question....

            Once one knows the prop is fouled and there's no forward thrust shouldn't the engine be shut off??  Engine had been running that day prior (enough charging batts. for vhf).  Also my experience with handhelds vhfs (which isn't much) is that they're only good if they're of a very good quality, your close to shore, there's no wind blowing and the big radio is dead.  Your thoughts on this please.   Terry

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          • C Spear
            Sometimes when you foul a prop you can stop the engine, then put it in the opposite gear and bump the starter to release the line. For instance, if you fouled
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 10, 2007
              Sometimes when you foul a prop you can stop the engine, then put it in the opposite gear and bump the starter to release the line. 
               
              For instance, if you fouled the line while going forward, stop the engine, and put the transmission in reverse gear.  With the throttle all the way down, bump the starter for a fraction of a second while pulling on the tail of the fouled line.  With a little luck you will just turn the shaft a little and unwrap the line a little.  Do this several times until the line comes free.  One person pulling on the line and another bumping the starter may be easier.
               
              Of course, before and after, check to make sure the engine and shaft are aligned and there is no leaking.  If you get the line off, try running the engine for a few seconds in neutral, then in gear at idle, both forward and reverse.  Each time, check to make sure everything is in proper alignment and nothing is leaking.  If all looks good, increase speeds a little until you have checked it all out at all speeds.
               
              Good luck,
              Craig Spear
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 1:30 PM
              Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Quick question....

              terry regan wrote:
              > Once one knows the prop is fouled and there's no forward thrust
              > shouldn't the engine be shut off?? Engine had been running that day
              > prior (enough charging batts. for vhf). Also my experience with
              > handhelds vhfs (which isn't much) is that they're only good if they're
              > of a very good quality, your close to shore, there's no wind blowing and
              > the big radio is dead. Your thoughts on this please. Terry

              You can run the engine, just don't engage the transmission. The battery
              charging comes from the alternator, which is not connected to the prop
              shaft at all. If you have a fouled prop, you can still charge and run
              your electronics, just do NOT engage the prop at all (it can cause
              amazing amounts of damage to... well, everything :)

              -dbs

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