Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Thinking about taking up another sport..........

Expand Messages
  • terry regan
    Today started out lovely. I invited my best friend of some forty years (who s starting sailing lessons on the lake, Tues) and one of my sailing classmates to
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 8, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Today started out lovely.  I invited my best friend of some forty years (who's starting sailing lessons on the lake, Tues) and one of my sailing classmates to go out for a day sail out of Scituate Harbor today.  Took off at about 11:00 am.  Nice breeze, plenty of sun,  good company, good food.  Went out about 14 miles.  Practiced sailing with eyes closed. Saw a large dark fin in water, went a little closer and discovered a whale about 15 - 20' long near us, it swam along side of us, at one point 2 -3 feet from the boat.  Awesome.  We told our virgin newbies how lucky they were to see this their first time sailing.  Practiced fast tacking and generally had a marvelous time.  Just around 4:00 noticed dark skies (NOAA had predicted slight chance of storms).   Started heading back (wind had been real switchy prior, but sunny).  Decided to roll in the jib.  Malfunction.....won't roll in, can't even budge it by hand.  Skie's darkening, drop main.  Then all hell broke loose.  Pouring rain, high seas, apprx. 40-50k gusts.  Life jackets, foul weather gear, newbies down below. Trying to keep it up into the wind. (Yes at first, me, just me). Skipper went down below for foul weather gear, seems like an hour alone at the helm. Bow getting buried, water into the cockpit, boat spinning once.  Seeing my friend looking in horror into my eyes.  She says now she could see the fear even though I looked like I knew what I was doing.  During this time she said they looked out the cabin windows and all they saw was ocean. Both agreed there was a lot of praying going on.  During this time the jib halyard had blown overboard and fouled the prop. Now more problems.  Boat out of control, another huge spin.  At one point while alone at the helm I heard the propeller out of the water.  I felt the boat was going to broach.  Transmission slipping (had been on the to-do list) so could power up more.  After the fouled prop I waited (a  little) and asked "Do you think we should call the C.G.?)  "Yes".  Raining so hard I couldn't keep my eye's open.  Went down below to see my friends for a moment and went back up.  Jib had been set free (bow being buried consistently) and flapping wildly. Gave our position to C.G. and Harbormaster (Add vhf to my list of quickly mastered and used skills). Long story short,  Sea Tow in the area and assisted with a tow. I was never so glad to see the human beings in my life (wanted to jump into the boat w/them  :-)       Towed back to Marsh field Harbor.  Soaked wet.  Dry shirt in sail bag (where the hell are my pants?) Pants in car in Scituate.  Long ride home.  Lots of thinking going on.  I'm good under pressure, crash after adrenaline rush, still shaking. Many hugs to my friends (who were glad I was on board).  They felt helpless, not knowing what to do to help. I promised them I'd taking them on another sail now that I'm a confirmed fair weather sailor (been there, done that twice, don't need to prove anything) and miraculousy they agreed!!!  Sorry if these is too long by email rules, need to vent, still shook.     Terry


      It's here! Your new message!
      Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
    • Mike Long
      Wow !!! Glad you made it back safely. Been through a few squalls myself , no fun. What kind of boat were you in ? ... years (who s starting sailing lessons on
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Wow !!! Glad you made it back safely. Been through a few squalls
        myself , no fun.

        What kind of boat were you in ?




        --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com, terry regan
        <luvssailing1212@...> wrote:
        >
        > Today started out lovely. I invited my best friend of some forty
        years (who's starting sailing lessons on the lake, Tues) and one of
        my sailing classmates to go out for a day sail out of Scituate
        Harbor today. Took off at about 11:00 am. Nice breeze, plenty of
        sun, good company, good food. Went out about 14 miles. Practiced
        sailing with eyes closed. Saw a large dark fin in water, went a
        little closer and discovered a whale about 15 - 20' long near us, it
        swam along side of us, at one point 2 -3 feet from the boat.
        Awesome. We told our virgin newbies how lucky they were to see this
        their first time sailing. Practiced fast tacking and generally had
        a marvelous time. Just around 4:00 noticed dark skies (NOAA had
        predicted slight chance of storms). Started heading back (wind had
        been real switchy prior, but sunny). Decided to roll in the jib.
        Malfunction.....won't roll in, can't even budge it by hand. Skie's
        darkening, drop main. Then all hell broke loose.
        > Pouring rain, high seas, apprx. 40-50k gusts. Life jackets, foul
        weather gear, newbies down below. Trying to keep it up into the
        wind. (Yes at first, me, just me). Skipper went down below for foul
        weather gear, seems like an hour alone at the helm. Bow getting
        buried, water into the cockpit, boat spinning once. Seeing my
        friend looking in horror into my eyes. She says now she could see
        the fear even though I looked like I knew what I was doing. During
        this time she said they looked out the cabin windows and all they
        saw was ocean. Both agreed there was a lot of praying going on.
        During this time the jib halyard had blown overboard and fouled the
        prop. Now more problems. Boat out of control, another huge spin.
        At one point while alone at the helm I heard the propeller out of
        the water. I felt the boat was going to broach. Transmission
        slipping (had been on the to-do list) so could power up more. After
        the fouled prop I waited (a little) and asked "Do you think we
        > should call the C.G.?) "Yes". Raining so hard I couldn't keep
        my eye's open. Went down below to see my friends for a moment and
        went back up. Jib had been set free (bow being buried consistently)
        and flapping wildly. Gave our position to C.G. and Harbormaster (Add
        vhf to my list of quickly mastered and used skills). Long story
        short, Sea Tow in the area and assisted with a tow. I was never so
        glad to see the human beings in my life (wanted to jump into the
        boat w/them :-) Towed back to Marsh field Harbor. Soaked
        wet. Dry shirt in sail bag (where the hell are my pants?) Pants in
        car in Scituate. Long ride home. Lots of thinking going on. I'm
        good under pressure, crash after adrenaline rush, still shaking.
        Many hugs to my friends (who were glad I was on board). They felt
        helpless, not knowing what to do to help. I promised them I'd taking
        them on another sail now that I'm a confirmed fair weather sailor
        (been there, done that twice, don't need to prove
        > anything) and miraculousy they agreed!!! Sorry if these is too
        long by email rules, need to vent, still shook. Terry
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > It's here! Your new message!
        > Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
        >
      • Ahmet
        No your e-mails are not too long, and it is interesting reading. I just feel like I have to cut-and-paste it into another file and break it up into paragraphs
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          No your e-mails are not too long, and it is interesting reading. I just feel like I have to cut-and-paste it into another file and break it up into paragraphs in order to be able to read it. Otherwilse it becomes very difficult to read.
           
          Were you able to drop the Jib if the roller was jammed ? What do you mean "Jib had been set Free "
          How big is your boat ? Having a whale 2-3 feet close to you is very dangerous. That was probably more of a danger thant the winds :):)
           
          Glad you guys made it back o.k.
          Ahmet
          "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
          Winthrop Yach Club
          Winthrop MA
          www.sailnomad.com
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, July 08, 2007 11:19 PM
          Subject: [MassBaySailors] Thinking about taking up another sport..........

          Today started out lovely.  I invited my best friend of some forty years (who's starting sailing lessons on the lake, Tues) and one of my sailing classmates to go out for a day sail out of Scituate Harbor today.  Took off at about 11:00 am.  Nice breeze, plenty of sun,  good company, good food.  Went out about 14 miles.  Practiced sailing with eyes closed. Saw a large dark fin in water, went a little closer and discovered a whale about 15 - 20' long near us, it swam along side of us, at one point 2 -3 feet from the boat.  Awesome.  We told our virgin newbies how lucky they were to see this their first time sailing.  Practiced fast tacking and generally had a marvelous time.  Just around 4:00 noticed dark skies (NOAA had predicted slight chance of storms).   Started heading back (wind had been real switchy prior, but sunny).  Decided to roll in the jib.  Malfunction.....won't roll in, can't even budge it by hand.  Skie's darkening, drop main.  Then all hell broke loose.  Pouring rain, high seas, apprx. 40-50k gusts.  Life jackets, foul weather gear, newbies down below. Trying to keep it up into the wind. (Yes at first, me, just me). Skipper went down below for foul weather gear, seems like an hour alone at the helm. Bow getting buried, water into the cockpit, boat spinning once.  Seeing my friend looking in horror into my eyes.  She says now she could see the fear even though I looked like I knew what I was doing.  During this time she said they looked out the cabin windows and all they saw was ocean. Both agreed there was a lot of praying going on.  During this time the jib halyard had blown overboard and fouled the prop. Now more problems.  Boat out of control, another huge spin.  At one point while alone at the helm I heard the propeller out of the water.  I felt the boat was going to broach.  Transmission slipping (had been on the to-do list) so could power up more.  After the fouled prop I waited (a  little) and asked "Do you think we should call the C.G.?)  "Yes".  Raining so hard I couldn't keep my eye's open.  Went down below to see my friends for a moment and went back up.  Jib had been set free (bow being buried consistently) and flapping wildly. Gave our position to C.G. and Harbormaster (Add vhf to my list of quickly mastered and used skills). Long story short,  Sea Tow in the area and assisted with a tow. I was never so glad to see the human beings in my life (wanted to jump into the boat w/them  :-)       Towed back to Marsh field Harbor.  Soaked wet.  Dry shirt in sail bag (where the hell are my pants?) Pants in car in Scituate.  Long ride home.  Lots of thinking going on.  I'm good under pressure, crash after adrenaline rush, still shaking. Many hugs to my friends (who were glad I was on board).  They felt helpless, not knowing what to do to help. I promised them I'd taking them on another sail now that I'm a confirmed fair weather sailor (been there, done that twice, don't need to prove anything) and miraculousy they agreed!!!  Sorry if these is too long by email rules, need to vent, still shook.     Terry


          It's here! Your new message!
          Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.

        • terry regan
          Hi Ahmet, The boat I was crewing on was about 28 feet long. (C & C tall rig). Not sure if I used the right term, by set free (jib) he uncleated the sheet and
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Ahmet,  The boat I was crewing on was about 28 feet long.  (C & C tall rig). Not sure if I used the right term, by set free (jib) he uncleated the sheet and let it blow loose. Couldn't roll by hand, couldn't pull down.  I think it's a problem of improper furling. (he doesn't backwind while rolling, ever) but not sure as I'm still a newbie. As for the whale, he was close.  I'll make a note of what you said.  Another first time.      Terry
            Ahmet <SailNomad@...> wrote:
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            It's here! Your new message!
            Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.


            Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel today!

          • Larry Robertie
            Hi Terry, The problem of not being able to furl the head sail is actually way to common. With many furlers, particularly as they age, the foil that encloses
            Message 5 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
            • 0 Attachment

              Hi Terry,

              The problem of not being able to furl the head sail is actually way to common.  With many furlers, particularly as they age, the foil that encloses the forward stay tends to catch at the top on halyards, particularly if those halyards have not been made taught.  One can actually by a "preventer" that bolts to the top of the mast and holds halyards away from the furler.

               

              As for letting go the sheet, well that's pretty scary to have all that cloth flapping about and the noise it makes, but in an emergency like you had it sounds better to throw off the line than to leave it secured and have the boat blown all over kingdom come.  Of course, it flogs the cr@p out of the sail, but better the sail take a beating than the crew.

               

               

              Larry Robertie

              Ruach, Catalina 34 mkII

              Salem,  MA

               


              --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com, terry regan <luvssailing1212@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Hi Ahmet, The boat I was crewing on was about 28 feet long. (C & C tall rig). Not sure if I used the right term, by set free (jib) he uncleated the sheet and let it blow loose. Couldn't roll by hand, couldn't pull down. I think it's a problem of improper furling. (he doesn't backwind while rolling, ever) but not sure as I'm still a newbie. As for the whale, he was close. I'll make a note of what you said. Another first time. Terry

            • Barry Needalman
              Since you and crew are safe, it was a great story to read and one I am sure you will add to your repertoire. Sailing: Hours of endless boredom, punctuated by
              Message 6 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Since you and crew are safe, it was a great story to read and one I am sure you will add to your repertoire.
                 
                Sailing: Hours of endless boredom, punctuated by moments of sheer terror.

                 
                On 7/9/07, Larry Robertie <Larry@...> wrote:

                Hi Terry,

                The problem of not being able to furl the head sail is actually way to common.  With many furlers, particularly as they age, the foil that encloses the forward stay tends to catch at the top on halyards, particularly if those halyards have not been made taught.   One can actually by a "preventer" that bolts to the top of the mast and holds halyards away from the furler.

                 

                As for letting go the sheet, well that's pretty scary to have all that cloth flapping about and the noise it makes, but in an emergency like you had it sounds better to throw off the line than to leave it secured and have the boat blown all over kingdom come.   Of course, it flogs the cr@p out of the sail, but better the sail take a beating than the crew.

                 

                 

                Larry Robertie

                Ruach, Catalina 34 mkII

                Salem,  MA

                 


                --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com, terry regan <luvssailing1212@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Hi Ahmet, The boat I was crewing on was about 28 feet long. (C & C tall rig). Not sure if I used the right term, by set free (jib) he uncleated the sheet and let it blow loose. Couldn't roll by hand, couldn't pull down. I think it's a problem of improper furling. (he doesn't backwind while rolling, ever) but not sure as I'm still a newbie. As for the whale, he was close. I'll make a note of what you said. Another first time. Terry


              • Tim Haibach
                Terry, The more sailing you do, one is bound to run into a similar situation at some point in their life. I haven t met conditions that bad on a boat yet, but
                Message 7 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Terry,
                   
                  The more sailing you do, one is bound to run into a similar situation at some point in their life. I haven't met conditions that bad on a boat yet, but I'm sure my day will come, hopefully not by choice. Seems like you did what any other prudent sailor would do- the best you can. Also glad to hear everyone made it back safely. Under the conditions with 2 major issues to deal with, you made the right choice for CG assistance. Don't give up, there are 100 sunny days for every 1 bad one. Now you have a truely salty sea story to tell over some cold ones at the pub.


                  Tim Haibach
                  S/V "Harmony"
                  Boston, MA


                  Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not web links.
                • terry regan
                  Thanks Tim, I was told, the more days you re on the water the more likely you ll be getting a surprise sooner than later. I just got done googling roller
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jul 9, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks Tim,  I was told, the more days you're on the water the more likely you'll be getting a surprise sooner than later.  I just got done googling roller furler jam, plenty of info.  Best point of sail to furl is a broad reach (downwind to blanket the sail) with tension on the leeward sheet (I knew that tension part anyways).     Terry

                    Tim Haibach <c2csailor@...> wrote:
                    Terry,
                     
                    The more sailing you do, one is bound to run into a similar situation at some point in their life. I haven't met conditions that bad on a boat yet, but I'm sure my day will come, hopefully not by choice. Seems like you did what any other prudent sailor would do- the best you can. Also glad to hear everyone made it back safely. Under the conditions with 2 major issues to deal with, you made the right choice for CG assistance. Don't give up, there are 100 sunny days for every 1 bad one. Now you have a truely salty sea story to tell over some cold ones at the pub.


                    Tim Haibach
                    S/V "Harmony"
                    Boston, MA

                    Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not web links.


                    Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.


                    8:00? 8:25? 8:40? Find a flick in no time
                    with theYahoo! Search movie showtime shortcut.

                  • Ahmet
                    I may be shot by some for writing this ! I don t mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however, Part of the problem with crewing on other
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jul 10, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I may be shot by some for writing this !
                      I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                      Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you don'k know what you are getting yourself into.
                      One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                      So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                       
                      If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there is a problem, I have time to deal with it.
                      You can always drop the sail if the furler jams, which most of the time is either due to a halyard being wrapped around the forestay up the mast, or the furler line having an override.
                      (Both happened to me, more than once, but I had time to solve the problem.
                       
                      ALso, the most likely thing that will happen after this is that people start being careless and don't watch the sheets and halyards, and guess where they will wind up.
                       
                      Whenever these kinds of things happen, I think about it afterwards, analyse it and try to find out what I did wrong, and how can I prevent it from happening again.
                       
                      In general these kind of experiences are good. .. as they say .. what does not kill you, makes you stronger.
                      Keep on sailing :)
                      Ahmet
                      "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
                      Winthrop Yach Club
                      Winthrop MA
                      www.sailnomad.com
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 9:13 PM
                      Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport..........

                      Terry,
                       
                      The more sailing you do, one is bound to run into a similar situation at some point in their life. I haven't met conditions that bad on a boat yet, but I'm sure my day will come, hopefully not by choice. Seems like you did what any other prudent sailor would do- the best you can. Also glad to hear everyone made it back safely. Under the conditions with 2 major issues to deal with, you made the right choice for CG assistance. Don't give up, there are 100 sunny days for every 1 bad one. Now you have a truely salty sea story to tell over some cold ones at the pub.


                      Tim Haibach
                      S/V "Harmony"
                      Boston, MA


                      Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not web links.

                    • Gary Conley
                      As always a calm, cool, considered and wise response. That s what makes you special Ahmet. Gary S/V Bacchus _____ From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jul 10, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        As always a calm, cool, considered and wise response.  That's what makes you special Ahmet.
                         
                        Gary
                        S/V Bacchus
                         


                        From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ahmet
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 11:10 AM
                        To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport..........

                        I may be shot by some for writing this !
                        I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                        Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you don'k know what you are getting yourself into.
                        One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                        So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                         
                        If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there is a problem, I have time to deal with it.
                        You can always drop the sail if the furler jams, which most of the time is either due to a halyard being wrapped around the forestay up the mast, or the furler line having an override.
                        (Both happened to me, more than once, but I had time to solve the problem.
                         
                        ALso, the most likely thing that will happen after this is that people start being careless and don't watch the sheets and halyards, and guess where they will wind up.
                         
                        Whenever these kinds of things happen, I think about it afterwards, analyse it and try to find out what I did wrong, and how can I prevent it from happening again.
                         
                        In general these kind of experiences are good. .. as they say .. what does not kill you, makes you stronger.
                        Keep on sailing :)
                        Ahmet
                        "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
                        Winthrop Yach Club
                        Winthrop MA
                        www.sailnomad. com
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 9:13 PM
                        Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport....... ...

                        Terry,
                         
                        The more sailing you do, one is bound to run into a similar situation at some point in their life. I haven't met conditions that bad on a boat yet, but I'm sure my day will come, hopefully not by choice. Seems like you did what any other prudent sailor would do- the best you can. Also glad to hear everyone made it back safely. Under the conditions with 2 major issues to deal with, you made the right choice for CG assistance. Don't give up, there are 100 sunny days for every 1 bad one. Now you have a truely salty sea story to tell over some cold ones at the pub.


                        Tim Haibach
                        S/V "Harmony"
                        Boston, MA


                        Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search that gives answers, not web links.


                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.10.2/893 - Release Date: 7/9/2007 5:22 PM


                        No virus found in this outgoing message.
                        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.10.2/893 - Release Date: 7/9/2007 5:22 PM

                      • terry regan
                        Hi Ahmet, I totally agree with you on this one! I have refused to sail with people before. The only thing that is difficult is when the crew is very green.
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jul 10, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi Ahmet,  I totally agree with you on this one!  I have refused to sail with people before.  The only thing that is difficult is when the crew is very green.  Everything could look fine (until the s##t hits the fan) from a beginners eye's.  Tried to get the jib down in plenty of time before storm hit.  Couldn't pull down either.  Now know what to do; should have bunched up the jib as best we could and tied, then spiraled the main halyard down around it.  (Thank you SeaTow guys, helpful hint, etched into my mind forever) It was decades of sailing experience versus 3 summers.......I now know that I'll never sail with this person again.  I have immersed myself into reading everything I can about roller furlers.  In a month I'll be able to dismantle one and put it back together  :-)   One never knows how someone will behave and react in a crisis situation until it is experienced.   I'm satisfied with the way I reacted in the situation.  As for that whale.   Given the rockin and rollin and twirling on the boat,  if he swam by I think I would have abandoned ship and gone for a ride. :-)  Terry

                          Ahmet <SailNomad@...> wrote:
                          I may be shot by some for writing this !
                          I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                          Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you dink know what you are getting yourself into.
                          One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                          So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                           
                          If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there 


                          Ready for the edge of your seat? Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.

                        • Ahmet
                          Usually, after I deploy the furling sail, I tug a bit on it and make sure that the sail will come back. The main problem is that people leave the furling line
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jul 10, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Usually, after I deploy the furling sail, I tug a bit on it and make sure that the sail will come back. The main problem is that people leave the furling line loose, instead of tightening it snug on a cleat. That can result in the line getting fauled.
                             
                            I have a spinnaker halyard that is in front of the forestay and goes down onto my bow puilpit. If that halyard is not snug, and I try to furl the sail in, it will wrap itself around the forestay.
                             
                            What happened to yours ? Was the drum not turning at all ???
                            Ahmet
                            "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
                            Winthrop Yach Club
                            Winthrop MA
                            www.sailnomad.com
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 12:48 PM
                            Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport..........

                            Hi Ahmet,  I totally agree with you on this one!  I have refused to sail with people before.  The only thing that is difficult is when the crew is very green.  Everything could look fine (until the s##t hits the fan) from a beginners eye's.  Tried to get the jib down in plenty of time before storm hit.  Couldn't pull down either.  Now know what to do; should have bunched up the jib as best we could and tied, then spiraled the main halyard down around it.  (Thank you SeaTow guys, helpful hint, etched into my mind forever) It was decades of sailing experience versus 3 summers.......I now know that I'll never sail with this person again.  I have immersed myself into reading everything I can about roller furlers.  In a month I'll be able to dismantle one and put it back together  :-)   One never knows how someone will behave and react in a crisis situation until it is experienced.   I'm satisfied with the way I reacted in the situation.  As for that whale.   Given the rockin and rollin and twirling on the boat,  if he swam by I think I would have abandoned ship and gone for a ride. :-)  Terry

                            Ahmet <SailNomad@...> wrote:
                            I may be shot by some for writing this !
                            I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                            Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you dink know what you are getting yourself into.
                            One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                            So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                             
                            If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there 


                            Ready for the edge of your seat? Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.

                          • terry regan
                            I think the drum wasn t turning. Couldn t even turn and roll by hand. I was steering the boat at that point, was told what wasn t happening w/ furler. Once
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jul 10, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I think the drum wasn't turning.  Couldn't even turn and roll by hand. I was steering the boat at that point, was told what wasn't happening w/ furler.  Once the s##t hit the fan any prior conversations at that point have been somewhat erased by adrenaline/hebbigeebie rush. This was a brand new system.  I noticed on previous sails no tension was every applied and jammed twice before, but was able to fix.  Being a newbie I thought well maybe the newer ones you don't have to do this (although had my doubts big time ).  Mentioned to him that on other boats I've sailed on you need to apply a little opposite pressure with sheet  Again it was the old decades of sailing versus 3 summers..

                              Ahmet <SailNomad@...> wrote:
                              Usually, after I deploy the furling sail, I tug a bit on it and make sure that the sail will come back. The main problem is that people leave the furling line loose, instead of tightening it snug on a cleat. That can result in the line getting fauled.
                               
                              I have a spinnaker halyard that is in front of the forestay and goes down onto my bow puilpit. If that halyard is not snug, and I try to furl the sail in, it will wrap itself around the forestay.
                               
                              What happened to yours ? Was the drum not turning at all ???
                              Ahmet
                              "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
                              Winthrop Yach Club
                              Winthrop MA
                              www.sailnomad. com
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 12:48 PM
                              Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport....... ...

                              Hi Ahmet,  I totally agree with you on this one!  I have refused to sail with people before.  The only thing that is difficult is when the crew is very green.  Everything could look fine (until the s##t hits the fan) from a beginners eye's.  Tried to get the jib down in plenty of time before storm hit.  Couldn't pull down either.  Now know what to do; should have bunched up the jib as best we could and tied, then spiraled the main halyard down around it.  (Thank you SeaTow guys, helpful hint, etched into my mind forever) It was decades of sailing experience versus 3 summers..... ..I now know that I'll never sail with this person again.  I have immersed myself into reading everything I can about roller furlers.  In a month I'll be able to dismantle one and put it back together  :-)   One never knows how someone will behave and react in a crisis situation until it is experienced.   I'm satisfied with the way I reacted in the situation.  As for that whale.   Given the rockin and rollin and twirling on the boat,  if he swam by I think I would have abandoned ship and gone for a ride. :-)  Terry

                              Ahmet <SailNomad@gmail. com> wrote:
                              I may be shot by some for writing this !
                              I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                              Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you dink know what you are getting yourself into.
                              One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                              So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                               
                              If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there 


                              Ready for the edge of your seat? Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.


                              Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.

                            • richard usen
                              I think this has been well covered before, but from the perspective of someone w/ furler experience going back to the 60 s, these suckers have several
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jul 10, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Message
                                I think this has been well covered before, but from the perspective of someone w/ furler experience going back to the 60's, these suckers have several potential problems: Setting them up w/ the halyard on the wrong side of the foil (usually gets corrected the first day of the season, guess how I know this?); Wrapping the halyard into the top swivel due to it being lead too parallel to the foil (also usually being corrected after the first sail); wrapping another halyard in the sail, due to it being stored on the pulpit, which is a bad location for just that reason; and tangling of the drum line. The last is possibly the most common. Inexperienced crew just uncleat the line and tug on the sheet and don't keep any tension on the line. A big tangle results. When there's a load on the sail, which you'll find in a squall, the tangle really jams up solid. You can sometimes use a winch w/ a tangle like this, but this can be dangerous, depending where the jam is located. I rigger I know claims you could break a head stay this way if the jam is at the masthead.
                                 
                                If the halyard is wrapped, you don't have too many options, since the sail won't come down and you can't furl it, and in a breeze, you can't even see what the problem is to fix it. My PO told me he once motored in circles to sorta furl the sail and it did work out OK.
                                 
                                Bottom line, I keep tension on the furling line when deploying the sail, and tension on the sheet when furling it in. Yesterday in 30 knots and a new crew, I just let the sheets fly and there was enuf tension from the wind alone.
                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of terry regan
                                Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 1:42 PM
                                To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport..........

                                I think the drum wasn't turning.  Couldn't even turn and roll by hand. I was steering the boat at that point, was told what wasn't happening w/ furler.  Once the s##t hit the fan any prior conversations at that point have been somewhat erased by adrenaline/hebbigee bie rush. This was a brand new system.  I noticed on previous sails no tension was every applied and jammed twice before, but was able to fix.  Being a newbie I thought well maybe the newer ones you don't have to do this (although had my doubts big time ).  Mentioned to him that on other boats I've sailed on you need to apply a little opposite pressure with sheet  Again it was the old decades of sailing versus 3 summers..

                                Ahmet <SailNomad@gmail. com> wrote:

                                U! sually, after I deploy the furling sail, I tug a bit on it and make sure that the sail will come back. The main problem is that people leave the furling line loose, instead of tightening it snug on a cleat. That can result in the line getting fauled.
                                 
                                I have a spinnaker halyard that is in front of the forestay and goes down onto my bow puilpit. If that halyard is not snug, and I try to furl the sail in, it will wrap itself around the forestay.
                                 
                                What happened to yours ? Was the drum not turning at all ???
                                Ahmet
                                "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
                                Winthrop Yach Club
                                Winthrop MA
                                www.sailnomad. com
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 12:48 PM
                                Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Thinking about taking up another sport....... ...

                                Hi Ahmet,&nbs! p; I totally agree with you on this one!  I have refused to sail with people before.  The only thing that is difficult is when the crew is very green.  Everything could look fine (until the s##t hits the fan) from a beginners eye's.  Tried to get the jib down in plenty of time before storm hit.  Couldn't pull down either.  Now know what to do; should have bunched up the jib as best we could and tied, then spiraled the main halyard down around it.  (Thank you SeaTow guys, helpful hint, etched into my mind forever) It was decades of sailing experience versus 3 summers..... ..I now know that I'll never sail with this person again.  I have immersed myself into reading everything I can about roller furlers.  In a month I'll be able to dismantle one and put it back together  :-)   One never knows how someone will behave and react in a crisis situation until it is experienced.   I'm satisfied with the way I reacted in the situation.  As for that whale.   Given the rockin and rollin and twirling on the boat,  if he swam by I think I would have abandoned ship and gone for a ride. :-)  Terry

                                Ahmet <SailNomad@gmail. com> wrote:
                                I may be shot by some for writing this !
                                I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                                Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you dink know what you are getting yourself into.
                                One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                                So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                                 
                                If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there 


                                Ready for the edge of your seat? Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.


                                Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.

                              • We 2 Sail
                                Actually Ahmet, This is one of those areas where our sailing club (www.pelagicsailingclub.org) really tends to shine. Every member, whether crew person or
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jul 11, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Actually Ahmet,

                                  This is one of those areas where our sailing club ( www.pelagicsailingclub.org) really tends to shine. Every member, whether crew person or skipper (boat owner) is asked to undergo three sailing evaluations to determine if they can perform the needed tasks, as a condition of full membership. The skippers boat is also inspected to meet the USCG requirements.

                                  On the website, check under Forms for what is asked of the applicants before they can be members. Not everyone cuts the mustard!

                                  With an annual dues of $65.00 a year it may be a stretch for some of us with limited resources <smile>, but we manage!

                                  Bob





                                  At 11:09 AM 7/10/2007, you wrote:

                                  I may be shot by some for writing this !
                                  I don't mean that this is necessarily the case in this situation, however,
                                  Part of the problem with crewing on other people's boats is that you don'k know what you are getting yourself into.
                                  One may not be able to know the skipper's abilities, or the boat's condition.
                                  So, a little bit of prudence may not be too bad.
                                   
                                  If I see a front coming, I furl in the sail before the winds pick up. That way, if there is a problem, I have time to deal with it.
                                  You can always drop the sail if the furler jams, which most of the time is either due to a halyard being wrapped around the forestay up the mast, or the furler line having an override.
                                  (Both happened to me, more than once, but I had time to solve the problem.
                                   
                                  ALso, the most likely thing that will happen after this is that people start being careless and don't watch the sheets and halyards, and guess where they will wind up.
                                   
                                  Whenever these kinds of things happen, I think about it afterwards, analyse it and try to find out what I did wrong, and how can I prevent it from happening again.
                                   
                                  In general these kind of experiences are good. .. as they say .. what does not kill you, makes you stronger.
                                  Keep on sailing :)

                                  Ahmet
                                  "Nomad"  1984 Catalina 36 Hull # 300
                                  Winthrop Yach Club
                                  Winthrop MA
                                  www.sailnomad.com
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.