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CC Canal tides etc ..

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  • Bill Scanlon
    Tim, Have you checked the Eldridge yet? I have a 2007 on th boat, I ll look up the tides for those days over the weekend. In the meantime check this out;
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 9, 2007
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      Tim,
       
      Have you checked the Eldridge yet?  I have a 2007 on th boat, I'll look up the tides for those days over the weekend.
       
      In the meantime check this out;
       
       
       

      Currents

      The single most important consideration for a sailboat transiting the Canal in either direction is the current. Tides at the east end, in Cape Cod Bay, are nearly 5 feet higher than tides at the west end in Buzzards Bay, and they occur roughly 3 hours out of phase with each other. As a result, currents flow hard through the Canal, topping 4 knots in most tide cycles and often exceeding 5 knots. There is a brief period of slack water as the current reverses direction every six hours, but it rebuilds to nearly full strength within an hour and a half of the change. Currents are similar, though less intense, for another 3 miles in the Hog Island Channel into Buzzards Bay.
       
      The only practical strategy in a modestly powered sailboat is to time your arrival for a fair current.
       
      Current predictions are available in Eldgridge and from the Canal website.

      Approaches

      The east entrance is straightforward day or night in all but a northeaster. The considerable fetch in that direction can offer a nasty surprise, and miles of lee shore, to a northbound sailor emerging from the shelter of the Canal. Change headsails inside, and consider laying over at the Sandwich Boat Basin if conditions are severe.
       
      The range lights just inside the entrance are helpful at night, but they are hard to pick up amid the visual clutter of the nearby powerplant.
       
      At the west end, the Hog Island Channel is narrow but straight and well marked. It's also frequently the choppiest, most unpleasant water around. The long fetch to the southwest is exposed to the prevailing winds of Buzzards Bay, and when these meet the west-going current from the Canal over a shoaling bottom, they kick up waves that even a 40-footer can bury her nose in. Timing your entrance to Buzzards Bay early or late in the day can help.

      Anchorages

      Anchoring is prohibited within the Canal. If you need to wait in Buzzards Bay for an east-going current try Pocasset, Megansett or Wild Harbor as a temporary anchorage.
      In calm summer weather, you can anchor off the state beach at Scusset for a swim in Cape Cod Bay. {CS}

      Moorings & Slips

      Moorings and Slips at the west end are available in Onset, a short distance north of the Hog Island Channel, or Red Brook Harbor, behind Wings Neck. The Onset channel is wider and less daunting than the chart suggests. Sandwich Marina has slips in the Boat Basin at the east end.
       


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    • richard usen
      Tim, please contact me off list. I ve made that trip a lot and I might have some suggestions. ... From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 9, 2007
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        Message
        Tim, please contact me off list. I've made that trip a lot and I might have some suggestions.
        -----Original Message-----
        From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim Haibach
        Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 12:00 AM
        To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

        Gregg,
         
        I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy. com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
         
         


        Tim Haibach
        S/V Harmony
        1985 Catalina 27

        My Blog-http:// 360.yahoo. com/c2csailor
        My Group-http:/ /groups.yahoo. com/group/ c2csailor


        Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

      • Moore, Gregg
        ACOE also has an automated, real-time HotLine update for tides, etc. for the Canal. Dial 508-759-5991 for today s situation. A handy # to have if you re
        Message 3 of 24 , Feb 9, 2007
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          ACOE also has an automated, real-time HotLine update for tides, etc. for the Canal.  Dial 508-759-5991 for today’s situation.  A handy # to have if you’re behind (or ahead) of schedule…

           

          -gregg

           


          From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Scanlon
          Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 7:42 AM
          To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MassBaySailors] CC Canal tides etc ..

           

          Tim,

           

          Have you checked the Eldridge yet?  I have a 2007 on th boat, I'll look up the tides for those days over the weekend.

           

          In the meantime check this out;

           

           

           

          Currents

          The single most important consideration for a sailboat transiting the Canal in either direction is the current. Tides at the east end, in Cape Cod Bay , are nearly 5 feet higher than tides at the west end in Buzzards Bay , and they occur roughly 3 hours out of phase with each other. As a result, currents flow hard through the Canal, topping 4 knots in most tide cycles and often exceeding 5 knots. There is a brief period o! f slack water as the current reverses direction every six hours, but it rebuilds to nearly full strength within an hour and a half of the change. Currents are similar, though less intense, for another 3 miles in the Hog Island Channel into Buzzards Bay .

           

          The only practical strategy in a modestly powered sailboat is to time your arrival for a fair current.

           

          Current predictions are available in Eldgridge and from the Canal website.

          Approaches

          The east entrance is straightforward day or night in all but a northeaster. The considerable fetch in that direction can offer a nasty surprise, and miles of lee shore, to a northbound sailor emerging from the shelter of the Canal. Change headsails inside, and consider laying over at the Sandwich Boat Basin if conditions are severe.

           

          The range lights just inside the entrance are helpful at night, but they are hard to ! pick up amid the visual clutter of the nearby powerplant.

           

          At the west end, the Hog Island Channel is narrow but straight and well marked. It's also frequently the choppiest, most unpleasant water around. The long fetch to the southwest is exposed to the prevailing winds of Buzzards Bay , and when these meet the west-going current from the Canal over a shoaling bottom, they kick up waves that even a 40-footer can bury her nose in. Timing your entrance to Buzzards Bay early or late in the day can help.

          Anchorages

          Anchoring is prohibited within the Canal. If you need to wait in Buzzards Bay for an east-going current try Pocasset, Megansett or Wild Harbor as a temporary anchorage.

          In calm summer weather, you can anchor off the state beach at Scusset for a swim in Cape Cod Bay . {CS}

          Moorings & Slips

          Moorings and Slips at the west end are available in Onset, a short distance north of the Hog Island Channel, or Red Brook Harbor , behind Wings Neck. The Onset channel is wider and less daunting than the chart suggests. Sandwich Marina has slips in the Boat Basin at the east end.

           

           


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        • Marvin Reynolds
          Hi Tim: You ve gotten some good input, let me add my 2cents as I have made the trip many times and love going through the canal at 10Ks ground speed. In my
          Message 4 of 24 , Feb 9, 2007
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            Hi Tim:

            You've gotten some good input, let me add my 2cents as I have made the trip many times and love going through the canal at 10Ks ground speed. In my opinion the roughest part of the trip will be Buzzard's Bay if you find yourself with the "wind against the tide"...pretty uncomfortable in a 27' boat. Don't know for sure but think your boat has only 20 gallons of fuel. I would carry a couple of jerry cans on deck and maybe you won't have to stop for fuel.

            Good luck. Captain Marvin, USCG MASTER 100GTons

            www.setsailyachts.com

            --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com, Tim Haibach <c2csailor@...> wrote:
            >
            > Gregg,
            >
            > I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy.com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Tim Haibach
            > S/V Harmony
            > 1985 Catalina 27
            >
            > My Blog-http://360.yahoo.com/c2csailor
            > My Group-http://groups.yahoo.com/group/c2csailor
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
            >

          • Ahmet
            There is much more to be concerned about than the Canal. The currents are predictable, and you have Onset to anchor easily and wait. When I make that passage,
            Message 5 of 24 , Feb 9, 2007
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              There is much more to be concerned about than the Canal. The currents are predictable, and you have Onset to anchor easily and wait.
              When I make that passage, I have to create a chart that goes over several days and shows the currents and winds at several locations.
              Most importantly, you need to worry about the currents between Orient Point and Fisher's Island, and also North of Block Island.
              Likewise you don't want to go against the tide going up Buzzards bay, but then wait for the current to turn around again before entering the canal.
               
              Any tide charts right now would not do you much good since you don't have any dates, and I doubt that you can pinpoint datse more than a week in advance.
              As I mentioned on the other list, the best strategy would be to make a dash to Onset, then wait for the favorable current, and continue.
              If the weather turns, you can always keep the boat in onset go back home and come back later.
              I could lend you a 36 lbs Plow anchor with 80 ft of chan, and also my generator. If you want to borrow my small dinghy withthe outboard,
              that is fine too.
              I would suggest that we get together one weekend so that to talk about the route in more detail with the chating programs etc
               
              Ahmet
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 10:48 AM
              Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] CC Canal tides etc ..

              ACOE also has an automated, real-time HotLine update for tides, etc. for the Canal.  Dial 508-759-5991 for today’s situation.  A handy # to have if you’re behind (or ahead) of schedule…

               

              -gregg

               


              From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Scanlon
              Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 7:42 AM
              To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [MassBaySailors] CC Canal tides etc ..

               

              Tim,

               

              Have you checked the Eldridge yet?  I have a 2007 on th boat, I'll look up the tides for those days over the weekend.

               

              In the meantime check this out;

               

               

               

              Currents

              The single most important consideration for a sailboat transiting the Canal in either direction is the current. Tides at the east end, in Cape Cod Bay , are nearly 5 feet higher than tides at the west end in Buzzards Bay , and they occur roughly 3 hours out of phase with each other. As a result, currents flow hard through the Canal, topping 4 knots in most tide cycles and often exceeding 5 knots. There is a brief period o! f slack water as the current reverses direction every six hours, but it rebuilds to nearly full strength within an hour and a half of the change. Currents are similar, though less intense, for another 3 miles in the Hog Island Channel into Buzzards Bay .

               

              The only practical strategy in a modestly powered sailboat is to time your arrival for a fair current.

               

              Current predictions are available in Eldgridge and from the Canal website.

              Approaches

              The east entrance is straightforward day or night in all but a northeaster. The considerable fetch in that direction can offer a nasty surprise, and miles of lee shore, to a northbound sailor emerging from the shelter of the Canal. Change headsails inside, and consider laying over at the Sandwich Boat Basin if conditions are severe.

               

              The range lights just inside the entrance are helpful at night, but they are hard to ! pick up amid the visual clutter of the nearby powerplant.

               

              At the west end, the Hog Island Channel is narrow but straight and well marked. It's also frequently the choppiest, most unpleasant water around. The long fetch to the southwest is exposed to the prevailing winds of Buzzards Bay , and when these meet the west-going current from the Canal over a shoaling bottom, they kick up waves that even a 40-footer can bury her nose in. Timing your entrance to Buzzards Bay early or late in the day can help.

              Anchorages

              Anchoring is prohibited within the Canal. If you need to wait in Buzzards Bay for an east-going current try Pocasset, Megansett or Wild Harbor as a temporary anchorage.

              In calm summer weather, you can anchor off the state beach at Scusset for a swim in Cape Cod Bay . {CS}

              Moorings & Slips

              Moorings and Slips at the west end are available in Onset, a short distance north of the Hog Island Channel, or Red Brook Harbor , behind Wings Neck. The Onset channel is wider and less daunting than the chart suggests. Sandwich Marina has slips in the Boat Basin at the east end.

               

               


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            • Barry Needalman
              I brought my new to me boat from Mystic to Boston about the same time of year. We all had a great time. You ll have a good time too. Here s my advice. Worth
              Message 6 of 24 , Feb 9, 2007
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                I brought my new to me boat from Mystic to Boston about the same time of year.  We all had a great time.  You'll have a good time too.
                 
                Here's my advice.  Worth what you paid for it.  Probably not news either.
                 
                1. Do not leave if the weather is not right for the trip.  Bad weather is what kills people on boats.  The marina will not kick you out on the 15th.  It's unlikely they will charge you either.
                 
                2. You won't need reservations in April.  We called the harbormaster looking for a mooring.  We got a muffled laugh and told to pick up any empty mooring.  No fees.  Unless you need to go ashore, moorings are quicker than slips.

                3. The canal is only hard if you don't time your entrance.  You can enter about an hour or so before the slack preceeding the current in your direction.  There isn't any current outside the canal on the east end, but some on the Buzzards end through Cleveland channel.  There is not a lot of pleasure boat traffic in April.  Get a copy of Eldridge to plan your trip.
                 
                4. Bring your own safety equipment (PFDs, harness, jacklines, handheld VHF, GPS, tools, fixit stuff).  Be prepared for equipment failures.  The autopilot wasn't working on our trip.
                 
                5. Keep warm.  Warm clothes.  Decent sleeping bags.  Warming foods and hot drinks.  Make sure you won't starve if the stove stops working.  Don't run out of food like the racers; the crew won't like it.
                 
                6. Be prepared to motor.  It is a delivery.  Days are shorter than summer too.
                 
                7. Sailing straight through is tempting, but the canal must be timed.  I have never been through at night, but the street lights on both shores must light it up like Broadway.  Sailing at night can be fun as long as you are not too close to shore where the hazards are.  Entering an unfamiliar harbor at night can be less than fun in New England.
                 
                On 2/9/07, Marvin Reynolds <CaptainMarvin@...> wrote:

                Hi Tim:

                You've gotten some good input, let me add my 2cents as I have made the trip many times and love going through the canal at 10Ks ground speed. In my opinion the roughest part of the trip will be Buzzard's Bay if you find yourself with the "wind against the tide"...pretty uncomfortable in a 27' boat. Don't know for sure but think your boat has only 20 gallons of fuel. I would carry a couple of jerry cans on deck and maybe you won't have to stop for fuel.

                Good luck. Captain Marvin, USCG MASTER 100GTons

                www.setsailyachts.com
                --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com , Tim Haibach <c2csailor@...> wrote:
                >
                > Gregg,
                >
                > I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy.com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Tim Haibach> S/V Harmony
                > 1985 Catalina 27
                >
                > My Blog-http://360.yahoo.com/c2csailor
                > My Group- http://groups.yahoo.com/group/c2csailor
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
                >


              • richard usen
                I ve been through at night many times, including one night when the engine quit and we drifted thru sideways, backwards, you name it. No problem at all. I used
                Message 7 of 24 , Feb 10, 2007
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                  Message
                  I've been through at night many times, including one night when the engine quit and we drifted thru sideways, backwards, you name it. No problem at all. I used to pull into the channel by the Gurnet and anchor where it's sheltered and got some sleep if the weather forecast allowed. Have a great trip.
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barry Needalman
                  Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 9:55 PM
                  To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                  I brought my new to me boat from Mystic to Boston about the same time of year.  We all had a great time.  You'll have a good time too.
                   
                  Here's my advice.  Worth what you paid for it.  Probably not news either.
                   
                  1. Do not leave if the weather is not right for the trip.  Bad weather is what kills people on boats.  The marina will not kick you out on the 15th.  It's unlikely they will charge you either.
                   
                  2. You won't need reservations in April.  We called the harbormaster looking for a mooring.  We got a muffled laugh and told to pick up any empty mooring.  No fees.  Unless you need to go ashore, moorings are quicker than slips.

                  3. The canal is only hard if you don't time your entrance.  You can enter about an hour or so before the slack preceeding the current in your direction.  There isn't any current outside the canal on the east end, but some on the Buzzards end through Cleveland channel.  There is not a lot of pleasure boat traffic in April.  Get a copy of Eldridge to plan your trip.
                   
                  4. Bring your own safety equipment (PFDs, harness, jacklines, handheld VHF, GPS, tools, fixit stuff).  Be prepared for equipment failures.  The autopilot wasn't working on our trip.
                   
                  5. Keep warm.  Warm clothes.  Decent sleeping bags.  Warming foods and hot drinks.  Make sure you won't starve if the stove stops working.  Don't run out of food like the racers; the crew won't like it.
                   
                  6. Be prepared to motor.  It is a delivery.  Days are shorter than summer too.
                   
                  7. Sailing straight through is tempting, but the canal must be timed.  I have never been through at night, but the street lights on both shores must light it up like Broadway.  Sailing at night can be fun as long as you are not too close to shore where the hazards are.  Entering an unfamiliar harbor at night can be less than fun in New England.
                   
                  On 2/9/07, Marvin Reynolds <CaptainMarvin@ rcn.com> wrote:

                  Hi Tim:

                  You've gotten some good input, let me add my 2cents as I have made the trip many times and love going through the canal at 10Ks ground speed. In my opinion the roughest part of the trip will be Buzzard's Bay if you find yourself with the "wind against the tide"...pretty uncomfortable in a 27' boat. Don't know for sure but think your boat has only 20 gallons of fuel. I would carry a couple of jerry cans on deck and maybe you won't have to stop for fuel.

                  Good luck. Captain Marvin, USCG MASTER 100GTons

                  www.setsailyachts. com
                  --- In MassBaySailors@ yahoogroups. com , Tim Haibach <c2csailor@.. .> wrote:
                  >
                  > Gregg,
                  >
                  > I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy.com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Tim Haibach> S/V Harmony
                  > 1985 Catalina 27
                  >
                  > My Blog-http://360.yahoo. com/c2csailor
                  > My Group- http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/c2csailor
                  >
                  > ------------ --------- --------- ---
                  > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
                  >


                • Bill Scanlon
                  Hi, When thinking about some sailing books to read while awaiting Spring or some books to keep on board consider these books and authors; Two staple sailing
                  Message 8 of 24 , Feb 10, 2007
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                    Hi,
                     
                    When thinking about some sailing books to read while awaiting Spring or some books to keep on board consider these books and authors;
                     
                    Two staple sailing and boat owners authors are Don Casey & Nigel Calder
                     
                     
                     
                    Coastal Navigation (U.S. Sailing Certification) (U.S. Sailing Certification) (Paperback)
                    by Tom Cunliffe (Author)

                    List Price:$20.95
                    Price:$14.25 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. Details
                    You Save:$6.70 (32%)

                    Availability: In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

                    Only 2 left in stock--order soon (more on the way).

                    Want it delivered Tuesday, February 13? Order it in the next 56 hours and 43 minutes, and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. See details

                    12 used & new available from $14.09
                     
                    This Old Boat (Hardcover)
                    by Don Casey (Author) "In the pages that follow, I will try to provide clear and logical instructions for enhancements that can add to the pleasures of use and..." (more)
                    Key Phrases: cleat stock, battery inefficiency, zipper assembly, Area of Side, Practical Sailor, Fine Line (more...)

                    List Price:$34.95
                    Price:$24.12 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. Details
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                    Upgrade this book for $3.49 more, and you can read, search, and annotate every page online. See details
                    Availability: In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

                     
                    Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual (Hardcover)
                    by Don Casey (Author)

                    List Price:$59.95
                    Price:$39.57 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details
                    You Save:$20.38 (34%)

                    Availability: In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

                    Want it delivered Tuesday, February 13? Order it in the next 57 hours and 11 minutes, and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. See details

                    41 used & new available from $31.70
                     
                    Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual (Hardcover)
                    by Nigel Calder (Author)

                    List Price:$49.95
                    Price:$38.98 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details
                    You Save:$10.97 (22%)

                    Availability: In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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                    49 used & new available from $32.05
                     
                     
                    Nigel Calder's Cruising Handbook: A Compendium for Coastal and Offshore Sailors (Hardcover)
                    by Nigel Calder (Author)

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                    Want it delivered Tuesday, February 13? Order it in the next 57 hours and 5 minutes, and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. See details


                    Bill Scanlon
                    USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
                    Towing & Sailing Endorsements
                    Lic. # 1092926
                    1984 Catalina 30
                    "Ruby"
                    Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
                    Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
                     
                    Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse


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                  • Bill Scanlon
                    http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cmps_index.php F.Y.I.; At the above link to SailNet s front page there is a nice picture of Boston s Flip Flop Regatta. Bill
                    Message 9 of 24 , Feb 10, 2007
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                      F.Y.I.;
                       
                      At the above link to SailNet's front page there is a nice picture of Boston's Flip Flop Regatta.
                       
                       


                      Bill Scanlon
                      USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
                      Towing & Sailing Endorsements
                      Lic. # 1092926
                      1984 Catalina 30
                      "Ruby"
                      Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
                      Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
                       
                      Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse


                      Any questions? Get answers on any topic at Yahoo! Answers. Try it now.
                    • Ahmet
                      Very good points. I have been through the canal at times, ... it is eerie... the lights on the sides show the way, but you are going into the dark. It was
                      Message 10 of 24 , Feb 10, 2007
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                        Very good points.
                        I have been through the canal at times, ... it is eerie... the lights on the sides show the way, but you are going into the dark.
                        It was funny.  Once I passed a huge barge around midnight.
                        It is important tp have 2 radios on, one on 16 and the other on 13. All larger vessels will announce their transit.
                         
                        Nonetheless I think that the Canal is safer at night than most other places on the ocean. You know where you have to go, and there are no lobster pots.
                         
                        The waters are relatively flat except of some standing waves and eddy's that can form.
                        Just for comparison... say the canal is 5 miles long .. current runs at about 4 knots. Timing it right, you can do it in in 35 minutes at 5 knot boat speed.
                        going agains the tide it will take you 5 hours !
                        As Barry said, Since the tidal currents are minimal in Mass Bay, but significant at Buzzards Bay, coming to Boston, it is best to enter the canal about 1 hour before the current turns south/west. This way you will have utilized most of the push of the current at Buzzards Bay. Going down south, it is best to enter just at slack, or an hour after the current turns south. That way you can enjoy the ride out of Buzzards bay with the current. 
                         
                         Ahmet
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 9:55 PM
                        Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                        I brought my new to me boat from Mystic to Boston about the same time of year.  We all had a great time.  You'll have a good time too.
                         
                        Here's my advice.  Worth what you paid for it.  Probably not news either.
                         
                        1. Do not leave if the weather is not right for the trip.  Bad weather is what kills people on boats.  The marina will not kick you out on the 15th.  It's unlikely they will charge you either.
                         
                        2. You won't need reservations in April.  We called the harbormaster looking for a mooring.  We got a muffled laugh and told to pick up any empty mooring.  No fees.  Unless you need to go ashore, moorings are quicker than slips.

                        3. The canal is only hard if you don't time your entrance.  You can enter about an hour or so before the slack preceeding the current in your direction.  There isn't any current outside the canal on the east end, but some on the Buzzards end through Cleveland channel.  There is not a lot of pleasure boat traffic in April.  Get a copy of Eldridge to plan your trip.
                         
                        4. Bring your own safety equipment (PFDs, harness, jacklines, handheld VHF, GPS, tools, fixit stuff).  Be prepared for equipment failures.  The autopilot wasn't working on our trip.
                         
                        5. Keep warm.  Warm clothes.  Decent sleeping bags.  Warming foods and hot drinks.  Make sure you won't starve if the stove stops working.  Don't run out of food like the racers; the crew won't like it.
                         
                        6. Be prepared to motor.  It is a delivery.  Days are shorter than summer too.
                         
                        7. Sailing straight through is tempting, but the canal must be timed.  I have never been through at night, but the street lights on both shores must light it up like Broadway.  Sailing at night can be fun as long as you are not too close to shore where the hazards are.  Entering an unfamiliar harbor at night can be less than fun in New England.
                         
                        On 2/9/07, Marvin Reynolds <CaptainMarvin@...> wrote:

                        Hi Tim:

                        You've gotten some good input, let me add my 2cents as I have made the trip many times and love going through the canal at 10Ks ground speed. In my opinion the roughest part of the trip will be Buzzard's Bay if you find yourself with the "wind against the tide"...pretty uncomfortable in a 27' boat. Don't know for sure but think your boat has only 20 gallons of fuel. I would carry a couple of jerry cans on deck and maybe you won't have to stop for fuel.

                        Good luck. Captain Marvin, USCG MASTER 100GTons

                        www.setsailyachts.com
                        --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com , Tim Haibach <c2csailor@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Gregg,
                        >
                        > I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy.com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Tim Haibach> S/V Harmony
                        > 1985 Catalina 27
                        >
                        > My Blog-http://360.yahoo.com/c2csailor
                        > My Group- http://groups.yahoo.com/group/c2csailor
                        >
                        > ---------------------------------
                        > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
                        >


                      • We 2 Sail
                        Tim, et a Hmm West Island, just outside and EAST of the West Island lighthouse generally has fuel, and may be easier to get in and out of, lets say New Bedford
                        Message 11 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
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                          Tim, et a

                          Hmm West Island, just outside and EAST of the West Island lighthouse generally has fuel, and may be easier to get in and out of, lets say New Bedford Harbor or Padanaram. I just don't know if they are open that time of year.

                          Anchoring in Onset is also feasible and often used while waiting to transit the CC Canal. I've used Onset several times, and the only caveat on Onset is to heed the dire warnings about not taking any shortcuts coming from the main channel into the Onset one (G13 QG 35 ft . . . on my 2006 Maptech chart it looks ambiguous).

                          Bob Early



                          At 11:59 PM 2/8/2007, you wrote:

                          Gregg,
                           
                          I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy.com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                           
                           


                          Tim Haibach
                          S/V Harmony
                          1985 Catalina 27

                          My Blog-http://360.yahoo.com/c2csailor
                          My Group-http://groups.yahoo.com/group/c2csailor



                        • jelofson
                          Tim, Why am I not surprised that you bought yourself a boat! You could talk me in to going along for at least part of the trip. Jeff
                          Message 12 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
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                            Tim,

                            Why am I not surprised that you bought yourself a boat! You could talk
                            me in to going along for at least part of the trip.

                            Jeff
                          • Ahmet
                            In Onset you just have to follow the charts. It is sort of difficult to miss because you could amost walk over the lobster pots that are all over the outside
                            Message 13 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              In Onset you just have to follow the charts. It is sort of difficult to miss because you could amost walk over the lobster pots that are all over the outside of the marked channel.
                              If there is strong current, which will be most of the time, you have to be VERY CAREFUL going into the channel.
                              There are rocks on both sides, and you have to make sure that you oversteer, with full power.
                              At times, I had to crab the boat at 45 degrees in order to make it into the channel. Mot a good time to sapce out !
                              Ahmet
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: We 2 Sail
                              Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 6:27 AM
                              Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                              Tim, et a

                              Hmm West Island, just outside and EAST of the West Island lighthouse generally has fuel, and may be easier to get in and out of, lets say New Bedford Harbor or Padanaram. I just don't know if they are open that time of year.

                              Anchoring in Onset is also feasible and often used while waiting to transit the CC Canal. I've used Onset several times, and the only caveat on Onset is to heed the dire warnings about not taking any shortcuts coming from the main channel into the Onset one (G13 QG 35 ft . . . on my 2006 Maptech chart it looks ambiguous).

                              Bob Early



                              At 11:59 PM 2/8/2007, you wrote:

                              Gregg,
                               
                              I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth, MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy.com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                               
                               


                              Tim Haibach
                              S/V Harmony
                              1985 Catalina 27

                              My Blog-http://360.yahoo.com/c2csailor
                              My Group-http://groups.yahoo.com/group/c2csailor



                            • Moore, Gregg
                              I second that! Onset is not a place to space out, but its tempting b/c it s really quite a beautiful nook. My group at UNH has surveyed the bottom for our
                              Message 14 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
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                                I second that!  Onset is not a place to space out, but its tempting b/c it’s really quite a beautiful nook.  My group at UNH has surveyed the bottom for our eelgrass restoration efforts in 2004/2005.  Plenty o’ rocks, and of course, you wouldn’t want to plow up all that wonderful eelgrass we planted!

                                 

                                -gregg

                                 


                                From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ahmet
                                Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 10:57 AM
                                To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                                 

                                In Onset you just have to follow the charts. It is sort of difficult to miss because you could amost walk over the lobster pots that are all over the outside of the marked channel.

                                If there is strong current, which will be most of the time, you have to be VERY CAREFUL going into the channel.

                                There are rocks on both sides, and you have to make sure that you oversteer, with full power.

                                At times, I had to crab the boat at 45 degrees in order to make it into the channel. Mot a good time to sapce out !

                                Ahmet

                                 

                                 

                                ----- Original Message -----

                                From: We 2 Sail

                                Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 6:27 AM

                                Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                                 

                                Tim, et a

                                Hmm West Island, just outside and EAST of the West Island lighthouse generally has fuel, and may be easier to get in and out of, lets say New Bedford Harbor or Padanaram. I just don't know if they are open that time of year.

                                Anchoring in Onset is also feasible and often used while waiting to transit the CC Canal. I've used Onset several times, and the only caveat on Onset is to heed the dire warnings about not taking any shortcuts coming from the main channel into the Onset one (G13 QG 35 ft . . . on my 2006 Maptech chart it looks ambiguous).

                                Bob Early



                                At 11:59 PM 2/8/2007, you wrote:


                                Gregg,
                                 
                                I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth , MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy. com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                                 
                                 


                                Tim Haibach
                                S/V Harmony
                                1985 Catalina 27

                                My Blog-http:// 360.yahoo. com/c2csailor
                                My Group-http:/ /groups.yahoo. com/group/ c2csailor


                              • Ahmet
                                It also has nice holding and fuel btw .. marinas.com is a great resource... http://marinas.com/view/marina/3196 ... From: Moore, Gregg To:
                                Message 15 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
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                                  It also has nice holding and fuel
                                  btw .. marinas.com is a great resource...
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 11:13 AM
                                  Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                                  I second that!  Onset is not a place to space out, but its tempting b/c it’s really quite a beautiful nook.  My group at UNH has surveyed the bottom for our eelgrass restoration efforts in 2004/2005.  Plenty o’ rocks, and of course, you wouldn’t want to plow up all that wonderful eelgrass we planted!

                                   

                                  -gregg

                                   


                                  From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ahmet
                                  Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 10:57 AM
                                  To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                                   

                                  In Onset you just have to follow the charts. It is sort of difficult to miss because you could amost walk over the lobster pots that are all over the outside of the marked channel.

                                  If there is strong current, which will be most of the time, you have to be VERY CAREFUL going into the channel.

                                  There are rocks on both sides, and you have to make sure that you oversteer, with full power.

                                  At times, I had to crab the boat at 45 degrees in order to make it into the channel. Mot a good time to sapce out !

                                  Ahmet

                                   

                                   

                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  From: We 2 Sail

                                  Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 6:27 AM

                                  Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat Delivery Trip

                                   

                                  Tim, et a

                                  Hmm West Island, just outside and EAST of the West Island lighthouse generally has fuel, and may be easier to get in and out of, lets say New Bedford Harbor or Padanaram. I just don't know if they are open that time of year.

                                  Anchoring in Onset is also feasible and often used while waiting to transit the CC Canal. I've used Onset several times, and the only caveat on Onset is to heed the dire warnings about not taking any shortcuts coming from the main channel into the Onset one (G13 QG 35 ft . . . on my 2006 Maptech chart it looks ambiguous).

                                  Bob Early



                                  At 11:59 PM 2/8/2007, you wrote:


                                  Gregg,
                                   
                                  I need to be out of the Marina no later than the 15th of April. So I am tentatively planning on eating dinner ashore on the 13th, spending the night at the dock, and casting off as soon as light breaks the horizon on Sat the 14th. I'm still working out fuel consumption calculations, and where available fuel docks are this time of year. Falmouth , MA is a definite stopping point south of the Canal. I intend to make a minimum of 3 stops, no real "overnight" sailing unless conditions, weather, temp, crew experience warrant. I have a pass for 2 transient nights at any of the Brewer Marinas at http://www.byy. com/. I also have to make a few calls to see where we could pull in for the night during the pre-season.
                                   
                                   


                                  Tim Haibach
                                  S/V Harmony
                                  1985 Catalina 27

                                  My Blog-http:// 360.yahoo. com/c2csailor
                                  My Group-http:/ /groups.yahoo. com/group/ c2csailor


                                • Jim Claffey
                                  Ahmet, Great site. Its nice to see a pictures in addition to the charts. This thread has been very helpful for me as well. I am planning my first trip through
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Ahmet, Great site. Its nice to see a pictures in addition to the charts.

                                    This thread has been very helpful for me as well. I am planning my
                                    first trip through the canal this summer. Tartan is having it's annual
                                    rendezvous at Kingman's Marina in Camumet. It's nice to know about
                                    Onset should I need to tuck in for abit.

                                    Any suggestions on the approach to Kingmans'?

                                    Thanks
                                    Jim
                                    T-28
                                    Flying Cloud
                                  • Ahmet
                                    Oh yeah... There are 2 approaches, one from the south the other from the north. The south approach is easier, but there are som shallow spots. So it it is high
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Oh yeah...
                                      There are 2 approaches, one from the south the other from the north.
                                      The south approach is easier, but there are som shallow spots. So it it is
                                      high tide, I'd prefer the south.
                                      The north approach is deeper. However, you need to study the buoys and
                                      follow the channel.
                                      It is sort of winding around the north edge of the channel. It looks as if
                                      you can cut straight in, and many do,
                                      and many get stuck in the mud.
                                      If you look at the buoys in the chart of Pocasset Harbor (13236) you'll
                                      understand what I mean.
                                      http://205.156.4.52/cgi-bin/EyeSpy.dll?MfcISAPICommand=getbrwx&img=D%3A%2FEyeSpy%2Fimages%2FOnline_Chart_Viewer%2F13236.axs&wsx=750&wsy=550&alx=4951&aly=4619&rf=2&buttons=%2Fcgi-bin%2FEyeSpyResources%2Fbuttons&alig=0&contenttype=image%2Fjpeg&eyespyc0029000145.x=71&eyespyc0029000145.y=32

                                      If the above link does not work, you can go to my website
                                      http://www.marinesys.net/MarineLinks/#mozTocId438171

                                      or
                                      http://www.marinesys.net/MarineLinks/


                                      You go along towards the next red and suddenly ther is a green to you right
                                      !
                                      the GC "3" !
                                      The channel off Patuisset is a bit narrow but good depth. Once you reach
                                      N"12" you are
                                      all clear.

                                      Ahmet
                                      www.sailnomad.com



                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: "Jim Claffey" <jtc348@...>
                                      To: <MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 3:20 PM
                                      Subject: [MassBaySailors] Re: Early Season Crewing Opportunity- Sailboat
                                      Delivery Trip


                                      >
                                      > Ahmet, Great site. Its nice to see a pictures in addition to the charts.
                                      >
                                      > This thread has been very helpful for me as well. I am planning my
                                      > first trip through the canal this summer. Tartan is having it's annual
                                      > rendezvous at Kingman's Marina in Camumet. It's nice to know about
                                      > Onset should I need to tuck in for abit.
                                      >
                                      > Any suggestions on the approach to Kingmans'?
                                      >
                                      > Thanks
                                      > Jim
                                      > T-28
                                      > Flying Cloud
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • Tim Haibach
                                      What dates would you be available in April? I d leave the 15th or 16th and trip would be 4-5 days. Tim Tim Haibach S/V Harmony 1985 Catalina 27 My
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Feb 12, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        What dates would you be available in April? I'd leave the 15th or 16th and trip would be 4-5 days.
                                         
                                        Tim


                                        Tim Haibach
                                        S/V Harmony
                                        1985 Catalina 27

                                        My Blog-http://360.yahoo.com/c2csailor
                                        My Group-http://groups.yahoo.com/group/c2csailor


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