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Re: [MassBaySailors] It's awfully quiet out here, of course its a sad time, when are you hauling

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  • We 2 Sail
    Lasat weekend, Saturday to speak was a glorious cap stone to the summer. We averaged 6.5 kts, beam reach, double reef, 50% of the 130 genny, and just soared
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 11, 2006
      Lasat weekend, Saturday to speak was a glorious cap stone to the summer. We averaged 6.5 kts, beam reach, double reef, 50% of the 130 genny, and just soared across the wave tops. Not bad for an Hunter 27, eh?

      Then there was Sunday going back. Ho Hum!! The only non-boring part is that I learned something interesting. The chart, north of Popes Island in New Bedford, shows a MLLW of three feet before giving way to four feet. In my three seasons of being there neither of those facts seemed very important. Sunday, as many of you may know, we had Astronomical low tides, actually the graph shows a  -1.6 feet (yeh, minus 1.6 feet). Fortunatley, very fortunately, it seemed to be a soft bottom and I really wasn't moving all that fast as the crew was preparing the boat to dock. Neither of them fell over  due to the sudden slowdown, either. Broke my old record of one grounding in one day in the past three years. Managed to have 3 within 20 minutes all in the same day! I was fearful I was gonna need to leave my boat on someone elses mooring field and walk back to the damn dock! <smile>

      I just hope Friday AM is just as wind free and boring. (without the soft groundings). <sad face>

      Friday the 13th,  we haul out and the hauler brings our baby home. We have experience with the blue tarps, getting about 3 years out of them. We thought about heat shrink wrap. Perhaps next year. Our "caged" frame is working out real well. Built it the first year using Kover Klamps and metal conduit. Recently in the Internet we say an SJ23 and they used 3/4" PVC Conduit. A more rounded   type of frame (probably cheaper not having to buy the reusable Kover Klamps.

      Here's a pictorial in an old issue of PS: http://www.practical-sailor.com/newspics/charts/849boatyard.pdf

      And another: http://www.practical-sailor.com/newspics/charts/8611wintercover.pdf

      (Naw, I don't get any royalties, but I do give lessons on Frame assembly. In fact, I'm having a class this Saturday AM if anyone is interested. Gratis, no credit, and it's "hands on training". <smile> )

      By way of an example, putting up the frame has one element which is similar to putting up one of those tents with a  free standing frame. It only free stands AFTER it is put up, but in between is a mild challenge of holding up parts until the last parts can be joined on that will enable it to free stand.

      Bob Early
      s/y Second Nature

       
      >Let's hear it from everybody, what are your winter lay-up plans?
      >When are you all hauling?  Anyone staying Wet this winter? 
      I am at WYC at $14 per foot, plus $150 in utilities.  I've decided to spread-out the high cost of winter storage, on-the-hard by alternating hard & wet every other year.
       
      >Do most of you shrink wrap?  How many use tarps?  Custom
      covers?



      Bill Scanlon
      USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
      Towing & Sailing Endorsements
      Lic. # 1092926
      1984 Catalina 30
      "Ruby"
      Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
      Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
       
      Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />
    • richard usen
      I dry store at Crystal Cove in Winthrop. I believe in overkill, and build a frame over the boat and nail a blue tarp to it. I ve done this for years w/ no
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 12, 2006
        Message
        I dry store at Crystal Cove in Winthrop. I believe in overkill, and build a frame over the boat and nail a blue tarp to it. I've done this for years w/ no problems until last year in December when the wind got inside the cover and destroyed the frame and cover. This year I'll build a more abbreviated frame and just cover the boat from the mast aft, using a canvas tarp. If this fails, next year I'll leave it bare. I haul after Nov 1 and launch sometime after April 15.
         
        I gave up wet storage after one winter when the windstorms kept me awake worrying about the boat and I was 15 miles away. I also discovered that by the time I hauled to paint, the savings wasn't that much.    
        -----Original Message-----
        From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Scanlon
        Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2006 8:28 PM
        To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MassBaySailors] It's awfully quiet out here, of course its a sad time, when are you hauling

        Hi All,
         
         
        It's awfully quiet out here.  Of course it's a sad time of year when sailing season is near over and all we have to look forward to is hauling.  ;-)   
         
        Let's hear it from everybody, what are your winter lay-up plans?
         
        When are you all hauling?  Anyone staying Wet this winter?  I am at WYC at $14 per foot, plus $150 in utilities.  I've decided to spread-out the high cost of winter storage, on-the-hard by alternating hard & wet every other year.
         
        Do most of you shrink wrap?  How many use tarps?  Custom covers?
         
        20 us from WYC will be sailing in the BVI's between Oct. 28th & Nov. 7th.  This obviously will extend our sailing season a bit.  We'll be down there during the 20th annual ProAm Race Week.
         
         


        In celebration of the 20th Anniversary, the Pro Am "Invitational," as it was first called, is returning to the format used for the first five years: a unique combination of fleet racing and match racing. For 2006, all 10 skippers, juniors and masters (and their teams) will take part in an exciting eight to 10 race fleet series, establishing the seedings for head to head match racing. The best of two-out-of-three race finals between the last two seeds standing will determine an overall winner, who, as the "Invitational" trophy dedication points out "excels at both match racing and fleet racing." Bitter End's fleets of Freedom 30s and Hunter 216s will be used for match racing.

        This year, IC 24s will be making their Pro Am debut as the fleet race boat. The four to five person IC 24 is a rapidly-growing class that has its roots solidly planted in the Virgin Islands. Essentially a more user-friendly, open cockpit version of the ever-popular J-24, the IC racing fleet has grown to more than 50 boats locally. Bitter End has two of the first ICs and the Tortola-based builder/manager/charter outfit Racing in Paradise will provide additional boats; which means that guests may have a chance to watch IC racers in action, including Andrew Waters, Fred Ruebeck, Colin Rathbun, Mike Masters, Mark Plaxton, Garry Turpin, Arjan Stoof, and Racing in Paradise’s owners, Richard Wooldridge and Chris Haycraft. These sailors are serious contenders on the Caribbean circuit that includes the Rolex Regatta and the BVI Spring Regatta and Sailing Festival.

        However, the show-stopper for this year’s event will be the high-octane rivalry between three-time America’s Cup winner Russell Coutts and Round the World Race winner Paul Cayard, as their Pro Am crews hit the open waters of the Caribbean. In addition to Pro Am racing, Coutts and Cayard will race against each other with one lucky guest crew along for the ride aboard matched Hobie Getaways for North Sound (and beyond) bragging rights! This exhibition match race will raise funds for the Hokin Scholarship fund.

        Bitter End and the Pro Am are popular with sailors of all levels, from America's Cup and Volvo Ocean Race winners Coutts and Cayard, to weekend warriors. Coutts says, "I'm already looking forward to the 20th Anniversary Pro Am. It's my favorite event of the year and Bitter End is my favorite vacation destination. It's great seeing many of the same keen guest sailors year after year."

        "We'll be there. This will be our fifth Pro Am and the whole family enjoys coming. We've had the pleasure of sailing with and socializing with some really nice people over the years," said Cayard.

        In addition to Coutts and Cayard, professional participants include Ken Read, two-time Pro Am winner, two-time Rolex Yachtsman of the Year, five-time J-24 World Champion and Etchells World Champion;


        Dawn Riley, Whitbread and America’s Cup veteran, President of the Women’s Sports Foundation and America True; Dave Perry, one of the best-known sailors of the last 30 years, both as a world class racer, and as an inspirational author and educator;; Lowell North, Founder of North Sails and Olympic Gold Medalist; Keith Musto, 2005 Pro Am winner, the U.K.’s best known dinghy sailor and Olympic Medalist; Rod Johnstone, 1st Annual Pro Am host, 2000 Pro Am winner and J-boat designer; Bruce Kirby, 1st Annual Pro Am host, two-time World Champion in I-14s, two-time Canadian Olympian, Father (designer) of the Laser, Sonar and Ideal 18 and penned America’s Cup racers for Canada (Canada 1 and 2), and Butch Ulmer, 1999 Pro Am winner and founder of U.K. Sails.

        "The 20th Anniversary of this unique event is quite a milestone. It's amazing how far it has come in those years. All the great skippers and guests, all mixing in a great location...it's just plain magic! Where else in the world can amateurs sail with the stars of the sailing world and have such a fantastic experience?" said John Glynn, Regatta Director.

        The 5th Annual Scuttlebutt Sailing Club Championships will also take place during Pro Am Regatta Week and Bitter End guests can enjoy an array of non-sailing activities that include lively cocktail parties, theme dinners, informational seminars, snorkeling, an excursion to beautiful Anegada, scuba diving, windsurfing and beachcombing.

        Schedule of events are as follows:
        Saturday
        Welcome Sunset Harbor Cruise

        Sunday
        Musto Scuttlebutt Laser and Hobie Racing Eliminations (morning)
        Musto Scuttlebutt Hunter 216 Racing Eliminations (afternoon)
        Day-Racing Awards Party at the Pub-All guests welcome!
        Meet the IC Fleet (The Pub)

        Monday
        Mount Gay Rum Defiance Day and Scuttlebutt Offshore Regattas Defiance Day Post Race Awards Party at The Pub Guest Cocktail Party (Almond Walk)

        Tuesday
        Pro Am Racing: IC 24 Fleet Racing morning and afternoon
        Pro Am Press/Guest Conference (The Pub)
        Scuttlebutt State of the Sport Forum and Discussion (The Pub) Join in the discussion with Tom Leweck, Scott MacLeod, Ken Read, Dawn Riley and others

        Wednesday
        Layday trip to Anegada
        Pro Hobie Getaway Exhibition Match Race Series (morning)
        Am Hobie Getaway Exhibition Match Race Series (afternoon)
        Theme Dinner at The English Carvery

        Thursday
        Pro Am Racing: IC 24 Fleet Racing (morning)
        Musto Scuttlebutt Sailing Club Championships (Finals in the afternoon aboard Hunter 216s and Hobie Getaways) Musto Scuttlebutt Awards Party and Limbo Jump-Up (Almond Walk)

        Friday
        Pro Am Racing: Juniors in Hunter 216s (morning)
        Pro Am Racing: Masters in Freedom 30s (afternoon)
        Pro Am Press/Guest Conference
        Mount Gay Rum Poolside Party
        Pro Am Awards Dinner (The English Carvery)


        For more information on the 20th Annual Pro Am Regatta or to reserve your space among the stars of the sailing world, please call 800.872.2392, email <mailto>binfo@... or cruise the web at <http>www.beyc.com.

        About Bitter End Yacht Club
        Stretching along a mile of unspoiled beach and expansive marina waterfront on the North Sound of Virgin Gorda, in the British Virgin Islands, Bitter End Yacht Club is the ultimate Caribbean destination for the watersports enthusiast.

        The North Sound – one of the largest, most protected noncommercial harbors in the Caribbean - is a must-visit destination for sailors, experts and novices alike. Bitter End’s calm, clear waters and steady year-long trade winds distinguish it from other resorts in the BVI and worldwide. Originally made up of a shorefront pub and five rustic cottages, Bitter End was purchased by Chicago’s Hokin family in 1973 and retains the spirit of a family retreat.


        Bill Scanlon
        USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
        Towing & Sailing Endorsements
        Lic. # 1092926
        1984 Catalina 30
        "Ruby"
        Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
        Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
         
        Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse


        Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.

      • Jim Claffey
        I m going to store over at Crystal Cove as well. It s more expensive than my previous storage at Marina Bay ($59 vs $53 per foot) but it s more convenient now
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 12, 2006
          I'm going to store over at Crystal Cove as well. It's more expensive
          than my previous storage at Marina Bay ($59 vs $53 per foot) but it's
          more convenient now that I've getting a mooring in Winthrop Harbor.

          JIm


          --- In MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com, "richard usen" <UsenR1@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I dry store at Crystal Cove in Winthrop. I believe in overkill, and
          > build a frame over the boat and nail a blue tarp to it. I've done this
          > for years w/ no problems until last year in December when the wind got
          > inside the cover and destroyed the frame and cover. This year I'll
          build
          > a more abbreviated frame and just cover the boat from the mast aft,
          > using a canvas tarp. If this fails, next year I'll leave it bare. I
          haul
          > after Nov 1 and launch sometime after April 15.
          >
          >
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