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Question about winter sailing

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  • Ahmet
    I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year. One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 11, 2006
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      I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year.
      One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one falls overboard, it is almost certain death.
      So I feel like I am sailing in a ocean of acid ..or poison .. whatever.
       
      If I was to wear a wetsuit under my clothes, would that give me enough warmth to either swim to safety
      (inside the harbor) or climb back aboard ?
      How much time do I have on 40 degrees water with a wet suit ?
      Any polar bears here ???
      Ahmet
       
    • We 2 Sail
      Hi Ahmet, Here is NOAA s new Windchill chart. Windchill Index chart: I d take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 12, 2006
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        Hi Ahmet,

        Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.

        Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

        http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml


        I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)

        Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

        http://www.bostonsailingcenter.com/Home/racing/FrostbiteRacing/FBReference

         

        Bob Early


        At 09:13 PM 10/11/2006, you wrote:
         
         
        I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year.
        One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one falls overboard, it is almost certain death.
        So I feel like I am sailing in a ocean of acid ..or poison .. whatever.
         
        If I was to wear a wetsuit under my clothes, would that give me enough warmth to either swim to safety
        (inside the harbor) or climb back aboard ?
        How much time do I have on 40 degrees water with a wet suit ?
        Any polar bears here ???
        Ahmet
        www.sailnomad.com
         

      • richard usen
        I ve spent 45 minutes in 45 degree water w/ no trouble in a 6 mil wetsuit w/ hood, boots and gloves. It would have been cumbersome to sail in tho, and you
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 12, 2006
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          Message
          I've spent 45 minutes in 45 degree water w/ no trouble in a 6 mil wetsuit w/ hood, boots and gloves. It would have been cumbersome to sail in tho, and you wouldn't be able to wear clothes over it.
          -----Original Message-----
          From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ahmet
          Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2006 9:14 PM
          To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

           
           
          I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year.
          One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one falls overboard, it is almost certain death.
          So I feel like I am sailing in a ocean of acid ..or poison .. whatever.
           
          If I was to wear a wetsuit under my clothes, would that give me enough warmth to either swim to safety
          (inside the harbor) or climb back aboard ?
          How much time do I have on 40 degrees water with a wet suit ?
          Any polar bears here ???
          Ahmet
           
        • Ahmet
          Thanks Bob. I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 12, 2006
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            Thanks Bob.
            I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
            The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
            Ahmet
             
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: We 2 Sail
            Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
            Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

            Hi Ahmet,

            Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.

            Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

            http://www.nws. noaa.gov/ om/windchill/ index.shtml


            I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)

            Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

            http://www.bostonsa ilingcenter. com/Home/ racing/Frostbite Racing/FBReferen ce

             

            Bob Early


            At 09:13 PM 10/11/2006, you wrote:


             
            I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year.
            One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one falls overboard, it is almost certain death.
            So I feel like I am sailing in a ocean of acid ..or poison .. whatever.
             
            If I was to wear a wetsuit under my clothes, would that give me enough warmth to either swim to safety
            (inside the harbor) or climb back aboard ?
            How much time do I have on 40 degrees water with a wet suit ?
            Any polar bears here ???
            Ahmet
            www.sailnomad. com
             

          • Barry Needalman
            It s better to remain on board. Rig jack lines, wear a harness, and clip on. Use a dual tether and never be unclipped, even in the cockpit. Make sure your
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 12, 2006
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              It's better to remain on board.  Rig jack lines, wear a harness, and clip on.  Use a dual tether and never be unclipped, even in the cockpit.  Make sure your handheld VHF stays with you.  I'm sure you do these things already.
               
              The following link shows survival time in Mustang Survival Suits.
              http://www.mustangsurvival.com/resources/learning/hypothermia.php

              The Boston Sailing Center runs frostbite races on Saturdays.
               
              On 10/12/06, Ahmet <ahmet@...> wrote:

              Thanks Bob.
              I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
              The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
              Ahmet
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: We 2 Sail
              Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
              Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

               

              Hi Ahmet,

              Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.

              Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

              http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml


              I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)

              Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

              http://www.bostonsailingcenter.com/Home/racing/FrostbiteRacing/FBReference

               

              Bob Early


              At 09:13 PM 10/11/2006, you wrote:


               
              I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year.
              One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one falls overboard, it is almost certain death.
              So I feel like I am sailing in a ocean of acid ..or poison .. whatever.
               
              If I was to wear a wetsuit under my clothes, would that give me enough warmth to either swim to safety
              (inside the harbor) or climb back aboard ?
              How much time do I have on 40 degrees water with a wet suit ?
              Any polar bears here ???
              Ahmet
              www.sailnomad.com
               


            • richard usen
              And, don t forget, cold air has a lot more power than in the summer. You ll need a reef maybe 10 knots sooner. ... From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 12, 2006
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                Message
                And, don't forget, cold air has a lot more power than in the summer. You'll need a reef maybe 10 knots sooner.
                -----Original Message-----
                From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barry Needalman
                Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 4:21 PM
                To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                It's better to remain on board.  Rig jack lines, wear a harness, and clip on.  Use a dual tether and never be unclipped, even in the cockpit.  Make sure your handheld VHF stays with you.  I'm sure you do these things already.
                 
                The following link shows survival time in Mustang Survival Suits.
                http://www.mustangsurvival.com/resources/learning/hypothermia.php

                The Boston Sailing Center runs frostbite races on Saturdays.
                 
                On 10/12/06, Ahmet <ahmet@...> wrote:

                Thanks Bob.
                I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
                The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
                Ahmet
                 
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: We 2 Sail
                Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
                Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                 

                Hi Ahmet,

                Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.

                Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

                http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml


                I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)

                Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

                http://www.bostonsailingcenter.com/Home/racing/FrostbiteRacing/FBReference

                 

                Bob Early


                At 09:13 PM 10/11/2006, you wrote:


                 
                I am planning to keep Harmony comissioned and sail her occasionally in the winter, like I did last year.
                One concern I have is, that, in the winter, if one falls overboard, it is almost certain death.
                So I feel like I am sailing in a ocean of acid ..or poison .. whatever.
                 
                If I was to wear a wetsuit under my clothes, would that give me enough warmth to either swim to safety
                (inside the harbor) or climb back aboard ?
                How much time do I have on 40 degrees water with a wet suit ?
                Any polar bears here ???
                Ahmet
                www.sailnomad.com
                 


              • Bill Scanlon
                Hi Folks, I am pleased to announce that today we went over the 150 member mark. Our group now has 151 sailors. New members please say hello, feel free to share
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 12, 2006
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                  Hi Folks,
                   
                  I am pleased to announce that today we went over the 150 member mark. Our group now has 151 sailors.
                   
                  New members please say hello, feel free to share a bit about yourself and your sailing interests. The rest of us please say hello and make them feel as welcome as we have with the first 149.
                   
                  Thanks to all of you for joining this E-Group. I hope you are enjoying its content and any other benefits your derive from it. We seem to loose one member for about every 5 that join. We just can’t please all the sailors all the time.
                   
                  I continually hope that more of you would post messages whether it’s creating a new topic or piping in on an existing one. Ask questions, offer advice, share a day sail or cruise itinerary etc.
                   
                  I’m guessing that the "daily digest" feature has kept many from leaving due to the e-mail volume. I also wonder if the "digest" option is keeping many of us from reading messages that might otherwise interest us or prompt us to respond.
                   
                  On October 31 the MassBaySailors Yahoo E-Group will be 1 year old. Again thank you for joining. After I return from our bare-boat charter vacation to the BVI’s I’ll begin planning our next meet & great / social.
                   
                  Stay tuned for the details. Everyone have a nice weekend!


                  Bill Scanlon
                  USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
                  Towing & Sailing Endorsements
                  Lic. # 1092926
                  1984 Catalina 30
                  "Ruby"
                  Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
                  Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
                   
                  Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse


                  How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger’s low PC-to-Phone call rates.
                • thefrencha@aol.com
                  About wet suit I sail most WE all winter ( irwin 40) a thin wet suit under jeans and shirt will do wonder when ON the boat as well as IN the water Had to
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 13, 2006
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                    About wet suit
                    I sail most WE all winter ( irwin 40)
                     a thin wet suit under jeans and shirt will do wonder when ON the boat as well as IN the water
                    Had to spend 20 minutes cutting a rope in propeller mid Febuary Cold of course but Not really a big deal
                     
                    Allorshas
                    CPYC
                  • Ahmet
                    Thank you.. that was the information I was looking (and hoping) for ... From: thefrencha@aol.com To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, October 13,
                    Message 9 of 16 , Oct 13, 2006
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                      Thank you.. that was the information I was looking (and hoping) for
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 8:44 AM
                      Subject: [MassBaySailors] Re: Question about winter sailing

                      About wet suit
                      I sail most WE all winter ( irwin 40)
                       a thin wet suit under jeans and shirt will do wonder when ON the boat as well as IN the water
                      Had to spend 20 minutes cutting a rope in propeller mid Febuary Cold of course but Not really a big deal
                       
                      Allorshas
                      CPYC

                    • We 2 Sail
                      About not having a real swim ladder. I recall seeing solution to not having a swim ladder, for example, if you had a canoe stern. The owners installed a
                      Message 10 of 16 , Oct 13, 2006
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                        About not having a "real" swim ladder.

                        I recall seeing "solution" to not having a swim ladder, for example, if you had a canoe stern.

                        The owners installed a folding ladder (rope and steps), and judiciously placed a line within reach of anyone who managed to get into the water "unexpectedly".

                        When the line was pulled, the ladder (pipe type steps, I  think) would deploy overboard providing suitable egress from the water.

                        Bob Early



                        At 01:13 PM 10/12/2006, you wrote:
                        Thanks Bob.
                        I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
                        The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
                        Ahmet
                        www.sailnomad.com
                         
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: We 2 Sail
                        To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
                        Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing
                        Hi Ahmet,
                        Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.
                        Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

                        http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml

                        I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)
                        Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

                        http://www.bostonsailingcenter.com/Home/racing/FrostbiteRacing/FBReference
                         
                        Bob Early
                      • Ahmet
                        Yes, that is what I mean with not having a real swim ladder. I have a few contraptions, but they are not that easy to use to climb in Ahmet www.sailnomad.com
                        Message 11 of 16 , Oct 13, 2006
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                          Yes, that is what I mean with not having a "real" swim ladder.
                          I have a few contraptions, but they are not that easy to use to climb in
                          Ahmet
                           
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: We 2 Sail
                          Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 7:42 PM
                          Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                          About not having a "real" swim ladder.

                          I recall seeing "solution" to not having a swim ladder, for example, if you had a canoe stern.

                          The owners installed a folding ladder (rope and steps), and judiciously placed a line within reach of anyone who managed to get into the water "unexpectedly".

                          When the line was pulled, the ladder (pipe type steps, I  think) would deploy overboard providing suitable egress from the water.

                          Bob Early



                          At 01:13 PM 10/12/2006, you wrote:

                          Thanks Bob.
                          I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
                          The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
                          Ahmet
                          www.sailnomad. com
                           
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: We 2 Sail
                          To: MassBaySailors@ yahoogroups. com
                          Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
                          Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing
                          Hi Ahmet,
                          Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.
                          Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

                          http://www.nws. noaa.gov/ om/windchill/ index.shtml

                          I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)
                          Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

                          http://www.bostonsa ilingcenter. com/Home/ racing/Frostbite Racing/FBReferen ce

                           
                          Bob Early

                        • richard usen
                          I once owned a rope ladder on a boat. I found it almost impossible to use, as w/ any weight on it, it doubled under. I threw it away as soon as I got ashore.
                          Message 12 of 16 , Oct 14, 2006
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                            Message
                            I once owned a rope ladder on a boat. I found it almost impossible to use, as w/ any weight on it, it doubled under. I threw it away as soon as I got ashore.
                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ahmet
                            Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 8:11 PM
                            To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                            Yes, that is what I mean with not having a "real" swim ladder.
                            I have a few contraptions, but they are not that easy to use to climb in
                            Ahmet
                             
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: We 2 Sail
                            Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 7:42 PM
                            Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                            About not having a "real" swim ladder.

                            I recall seeing "solution" to not having a swim ladder, for example, if you had a canoe stern.

                            The owners installed a folding ladder (rope and steps), and judiciously placed a line within reach of anyone who managed to get into the water "unexpectedly".

                            When the line was pulled, the ladder (pipe type steps, I  think) would deploy overboard providing suitable egress from the water.

                            Bob Early



                            At 01:13 PM 10/12/2006, you wrote:

                            Thanks Bob.
                            I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
                            The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
                            Ahmet
                            www.sailnomad. com
                             
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: We 2 Sail
                            To: MassBaySailors@ yahoogroups. com
                            Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
                            Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing
                            Hi Ahmet,
                            Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.
                            Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

                            http://www.nws. noaa.gov/ om/windchill/ index.shtml

                            I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)
                            Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

                            http://www.bostonsa ilingcenter. com/Home/ racing/Frostbite Racing/FBReferen ce

                             
                            Bob Early

                          • Bill Scanlon
                            Digital Selective Calling By Morton Biback, Registered Examiner, Marine Radio Chair, Electronic Navigation, Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons | Home |
                            Message 13 of 16 , Oct 14, 2006
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                              Digital Selective Calling
                              By Morton Biback,
                              Registered Examiner, Marine Radio
                              Chair, Electronic Navigation,
                              Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons
                              Searoom Logo
                              | Home |
                              If you look at a new marine radio, you will notice a red button marked “DISTRESS” protected by a spring- loaded cover to prevent it from being accidentally pressed. This button tells you that the radio has DSC, (Digital Selective Calling). DSC is an advanced, computerized form of VHF and MF radio designed for marine use. New radios with DSC capability are replacing the VHF and the MF type of radios that have been in use for more than half a century. They have all of the capabilities of the earlier radios and a number of new features that can add dramatically to the safety aspects and the usefulness of marine communications.
                               
                              DSC automates many aspects of radio communication. Without using a microphone, a user can make a distress call just by pressing one button on the radio. DSC will then automatically supply the Coast Guard (Canadian or US) and other vessels in the area with your identification and your location. You can even dial in the reason for the distress call. DSC will automatically repeat the distress call until it is acknowledged. These digital communications result in visual messages being displayed on a receiver’s display screen much like information displayed on a computer's monitor.
                               
                              DSC radio can make distress calls, urgency calls, safety and all ships calls as well as routine calls (the usual person to person type calls we make using non-DSC radios) using only buttons on the radio's keyboard. They can also digitally make position requests (asking other vessels their exact location) and polling calls (who is within communication range?).
                               
                              In the same way that your telephone rings when you receive incoming calls an alert will sound if there is a call for you or if there is a priority call such as a distress, urgency or safety message. Eventually, there will be no need to monitor Channel 16. In Canada, the requirement that compulsorily fitted vessels monitor Channel 16 has been dropped. Such vessels are now only required to monitor digital data on Channel 70 and MF frequency 2178.5 kHz. However, a large number of vessels are still not equipped with DSC radio, so it is desirable that Channel 16 still be monitored. The Coast Guards in both Canada and the US are still monitoring Channel 16 and will do so for the foreseeable future.
                               
                              If you make a digital call of any kind using DSC, your radio transmits the message on Channel 70; thus relieving congestion on Channel 16. This digital call is sent at ‘computer speed’, taking only a moment of air time.
                              All DSC equipped marine radios can be connected to a GPS, so your radio ‘knows’ your exact location and the exact time and sends out this information with a distress call. This can truly be a lifesaver, it takes the "search" out of search and rescue.
                               
                              DSC calls can be made directly to another vessel without broadcasting; it is much more private, like making a phone call. Remember, a DSC call does not use Channel 16. If the call is directed to an individual station, then that signal is sent on Channel 70 and only that station receives the call. The call can include the channel number on which you want to hold an ordinary conversation. Channel 70 is only used for digital communication; you cannot use voice on that channel.
                               
                              You can store numbers that connect you to other vessels (like storing phone numbers on a cell phone). Your radio can keep a log of calls.
                               
                              DSC radios are available in four categories, Class A, Class B, Class D and SC-101. They differ in their features and cost.
                               
                              Class A and Class B radios are designed for commercial vessels. They are pricey and are not usually of interest to pleasurecraft owners.
                               
                              Class D radios are designed for commercial boats that are not required to carry Class A or Class B equipment and for recreational boaters. They are not as expensive as Class A or B. At the time of writing, prices for a Class D radio can be as low as $400. Most models cost about $500 to $1000. If the price of a Class D radio is within your budget, we recommend that you use this type of DSC radio.
                               
                              SC-101 is the low cost, entry level standard for DSC radios. By International law, it cannot be used on commercial vessels, but may be used on recreational boats. This class of DSC radio is very limited in capability. These can cost as little as $200.
                               
                              What do you get for your money?

                              One difference between lower cost radios is the methods used to enter data. Better radios tend to have a keyboard method of inputting information rather than turning dials. There is one very important difference between a SC-101 radio and a Class D. A true Class D radio has two receivers, one of which constantly monitors Channel 70. An SC-101 radio has only one receiver. If you are tuned to a different channel or if you are transmitting, then the single receiver cannot receive on Channel 70. Some units have a quick change feature in which they momentarily listen to Channel 70 then return to the channel you are tuned to. This is still not as good a system as having dual receivers built in, one always listening to Channel 70.
                               
                              A Class D unit will not miss any calls arriving on Channel 70 because it constantly monitors that channel. Like anything else, you get what you pay for.
                               
                              VHF-DSC has the same range as ordinary VHF as well as the same power restrictions, but it is more efficient than ordinary VHF.
                              MMSI #
                              • Every telephone needs a phone number so that it can be called. This phone number identifies your phone and is unique. The same principle applies to DSC radios; each must have its own number. This number is called the Maritime Mobile Service Identity number (MMSI).
                               
                              • The MMSI number is nine digits long. The first three digits are the country identifier followed by another six digits which are unique to your marine radio. United States country identifiers are 303, 338, 366, 367, 368 or 369. The Canadian country identifier is 316.
                              • Coast Guard Stations begin with a double zero. So a number like 003161234 would be interpreted as follows. . . The double zero would mean that this is a Coast Guard Station. The 316 indicates that it is a Canadian station. The 1234 further identifies that individual station.
                              • Fleet numbers (see below) begin with a single zero.
                              Obtaining an MMSI #
                              • MMSI numbers are issued free of charge. In the United States you apply for one by filling out Form 605 which is available online at http://www.fcc.gov/formpage.html. You may also apply at BoatUS at http://www.boatus.com/mmsi/. SeaTow can also issue an MMSI number, apply at http://seatow.com/.
                              • Canadians obtain their free MMSI number by contacting Industry Canada at http://sd.ic.gc.ca.
                              Fleet Numbers
                              • You may belong to a ‘fleet’ and share that fleet’s identification number. You may belong to a Yacht Club and all members of that club can be part of the same ‘fleet’. A call addressed to that fleet’s identification number will be picked up by all members of that fleet. . For example, the Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons has been assigned the fleet number 031600018. Even though a station may use a fleet number, it must also have its own MMSI number.
                              Some Features to Consider when buying a DSC
                              • If you want to have a fleet number as well as your own assigned station MMSI number, make sure that the radio you are buying can accommodate both numbers. Not all radios have this capability.
                              • Some DSC radios require that you select the working channel manually once you have made contact on Channel 70. Others will automatically switch to the indicated working channel.
                              • DSC radios can usually store MMSI numbers in much the same way that a cellular phone does. Some allow you to show boat names, etc. and these names appear on the DSC radio's screen when receiving a call from a station whose MMSI number is stored in your radio's memory.
                              • If you need to be guaranteed that conversations are kept private, you can get a model that has a built in scrambler.
                              The Simulator
                              The Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons offer a Maritime Radio course as all operators are required to have a Restricted Operator’s Certificate (Maritime). Once you obtain this, it is good for life. As part of the course material, there is a CD on which there is a Simulator which you may use on your home computer. This simulator teaches the use of the different features of a VHF-DSC. It even has a simulated cruise that demonstrates the use of DSC. This CD is scheduled for release in March/2006.
                              To get more information on obtaining your operator’s certificate, contact the Canadian Power & Sail Squadrons phone: 1-888-CPS-BOAT (277-2628)



                              Bill Scanlon
                              USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
                              Towing & Sailing Endorsements
                              Lic. # 1092926
                              1984 Catalina 30
                              "Ruby"
                              Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
                              Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
                               
                              Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse


                              Get your email and more, right on the new Yahoo.com
                            • Bill Scanlon
                              http://courageoussailing.org/ egistration form. Adult Frostbite Sailing We have begun registration for the 06-07 Frostbite season. Notice of Race Race Schedule
                              Message 14 of 16 , Oct 14, 2006
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                                egistration form.

                                Adult Frostbite Sailing
                                We have begun registration for the 06-07 Frostbite season.
                                Notice of Race
                                Race Schedule
                                Registration
                                 
                                 

                                Races

                                There's nothing like the thrill and competitiveness of racing to improve your skills. Courageous makes it easy to get involved, whether a beginner or expert.

                                Frostbite Racing
                                Courageous hosts this exciting Saturday racing series from November to March each winter. J22s and Rhodes 19s are still available. Call 617-242-3821 to sign up.
                                 
                                Clinics
                                Courageous offers clinics in spinnaker handling and much more! We cover important navigational skills, racing tactics, and boat speed in modular sections so you can focus on the areas where you want to improve. These FREE racing clinics are held every month. Courageous also provides informal lectures and talks after racing on both Tuesday and Friday nights.
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                The Interclub Dinghy Frostbite class, originally envisioned as a class for Inter-Club racing on Long Island sound, attracts some of the best sailors from a variety of other "summer" classes and provides great short course sailing on Sunday afternoons in the Northeast. Frostbiting an InterClub is a funny sport. People often ask "why should I get into a small dinghy in the winter when I can sail a PHRF boat or sit home and watch football". Then they try it and find out that IC sailing is a blast! The boats are fun to sail, tack and jibe on a dime, and require real skill to drive. Crews soon discover the importance of team work and instinctive reaction.
                                 
                                Interested in trying frostbiting? Contact our commodore for information. Just want to lurk for a while? Click here to subscribe to winthrop_frostbite mailing list.
                                 
                                 

                                Interclubs are Not Self-Rescuing Boats
                                Capsize & Rescue Procedure

                                Illustrated with pictures from an on-the-water demo
                                conducted by John Pratt, November 2002.


                                Bill Scanlon
                                USCG Master 50 GT Inland Waters
                                Towing & Sailing Endorsements
                                Lic. # 1092926
                                1984 Catalina 30
                                "Ruby"
                                Std. Rig  Hull#  3688
                                Winthrop (Mass.) Yacht Club
                                 
                                Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse


                                Do you Yahoo!?
                                Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
                              • Ahmet
                                That has been my experience too. Even climbing onto a dinghy, it is easier to just lift yourself up. Now some of those who work at Cique de-Solei may be able
                                Message 15 of 16 , Oct 16, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  That has been my experience too. Even climbing onto a dinghy, it is easier to just lift yourself up.
                                  Now some of those who work at Cique de-Solei may be able too, but not me !
                                  Ahmet
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2006 8:00 AM
                                  Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                                  I once owned a rope ladder on a boat. I found it almost impossible to use, as w/ any weight on it, it doubled under. I threw it away as soon as I got ashore.
                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: MassBaySailors@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:MassBaySail ors@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Ahmet
                                  Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 8:11 PM
                                  To: MassBaySailors@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                                  Yes, that is what I mean with not having a "real" swim ladder.
                                  I have a few contraptions, but they are not that easy to use to climb in
                                  Ahmet
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: We 2 Sail
                                  Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 7:42 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                                  About not having a "real" swim ladder.

                                  I recall seeing "solution" to not having a swim ladder, for example, if you had a canoe stern.

                                  The owners installed a folding ladder (rope and steps), and judiciously placed a line within reach of anyone who managed to get into the water "unexpectedly" .

                                  When the line was pulled, the ladder (pipe type steps, I  think) would deploy overboard providing suitable egress from the water.

                                  Bob Early



                                  At 01:13 PM 10/12/2006, you wrote:

                                  Thanks Bob.
                                  I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
                                  The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
                                  Ahmet
                                  www.sailnomad. com
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: We 2 Sail
                                  To: MassBaySailors@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing
                                  Hi Ahmet,
                                  Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.
                                  Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

                                  http://www.nws. noaa.gov/ om/windchill/ index.shtml

                                  I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)
                                  Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

                                  http://www.bostonsa ilingcenter. com/Home/ racing/Frostbite Racing/FBReferen ce

                                   
                                  Bob Early

                                • We 2 Sail
                                  A few years ago I took a challenge. The idea was to capsize (self induce), right the boat, refloat it with as little water as possible, and then enter the
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Oct 16, 2006
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                                    A few years ago I took a challenge. The idea was to capsize (self induce), right the boat, refloat it with as little water as possible, and then enter the boat. Which I  did. Did I mention the "boat" was an 18 foot "White", old canvas and wood canoe?

                                    I tried getting into my inflatable dinghy last summer (no, did not capsize do to OB engine considerations, like didn't want to dunk it upside down in seawater nor risk losing it).  Yes, well, I did manage, but had a hard time trying to explain all the red marks on my chest and legs.

                                    Moral of story: Don't get separated from ones boat. Also, it must be a really tough decision to be sailing on a well balanced boat, go over and have to decide quickly: Do I cut my tether and NOT drown, or cut the harness and drown later as a I watch the well balanced boat sail off into the distance.

                                    I guess that's the one advantage of my old Hunter. It always wants to round up to the wind.

                                    Bob Early




                                    At 11:15 AM 10/16/2006, you wrote:
                                    That has been my experience too. Even climbing onto a dinghy, it is easier to just lift yourself up.
                                    Now some of those who work at Cique de-Solei may be able too, but not me !
                                    Ahmet
                                    www.sailnomad.com
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: richard usen
                                    To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2006 8:00 AM
                                    Subject: RE: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                                    I once owned a rope ladder on a boat. I found it almost impossible to use, as w/ any weight on it, it doubled under. I threw it away as soon as I got ashore.
                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com [ mailto:MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ahmet
                                    Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 8:11 PM
                                    To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                                    Yes, that is what I mean with not having a "real" swim ladder.
                                    I have a few contraptions, but they are not that easy to use to climb in
                                    Ahmet
                                    www.sailnomad.com
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: We 2 Sail
                                    To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Friday, October 13, 2006 7:42 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing

                                    About not having a "real" swim ladder.

                                    I recall seeing "solution" to not having a swim ladder, for example, if you had a canoe stern.

                                    The owners installed a folding ladder (rope and steps), and judiciously placed a line within reach of anyone who managed to get into the water "unexpectedly".

                                    When the line was pulled, the ladder (pipe type steps, I  think) would deploy overboard providing suitable egress from the water.

                                    Bob Early



                                    At 01:13 PM 10/12/2006, you wrote:
                                    Thanks Bob.
                                    I would not really go sailing in very windy conditions, but it is sometimes nice to spend a relaxing sunny afternoon on the water, even if it is winter.
                                    The Bristol does not have a real swim ladder, and it would take some effort to get back in, if you land in the drink.
                                    Ahmet
                                    www.sailnomad.com
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: We 2 Sail
                                    To: MassBaySailors@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 9:12 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [MassBaySailors] Question about winter sailing
                                    Hi Ahmet,
                                    Here is NOAA's "new" Windchill chart.
                                    Windchill Index chart: I'd take it with a grain of salt because thermal transfer in liquids is much better than in air, and the last time I checked, Boston Harbor is still in liquid form. <smile>

                                    http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml
                                    I believe there is a "Frostbite" Sailing Club in Boston, but don't know if it is an "Official Club" or just a motley collection of sailors wishing to defy the "Assumed truth" that the sailing season ends in fall and begins in spring. (Just like a lot of people think the NE hiking season follows the same pattern: Spring through Fall. That's probably why there's so few hikers in the winter.)
                                    Hey, I googled Frostbite Sailing Boston and came up with multiple hits. Here's one of them.

                                    http://www.bostonsailingcenter.com/Home/racing/FrostbiteRacing/FBReference
                                     
                                    Bob Early

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