Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Gaited Arabians

Expand Messages
  • T Cox
    No classes in the Arabian shows for gaited Arabians. You will find them in open pleasure shows, here and there, especially in the southwest. People who own
    Message 1 of 32 , Jul 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
       
      No classes in the Arabian shows for gaited Arabians.  You will find them in open pleasure shows, here and there, especially in the southwest.
       
      People who own those that are inclined to gait and who are able to recognize such, encourage it and develop the gaits for trail, especially the "single foot" also known at the "slow gait"as in Saddlebred showing.
       
      There is an Arabian gelding (he is in his late teens now) that was shown in open pleasure shows here in Michigan in the walk "any type of gait other than trot and canter pleasure classes" where you would find Pasos, Rocky Mountains, TW, Saddlebreds, etc.  He won many and was known as the Syncopator. 

      Country Pleasure is an English saddleseat class (walk.trot, canter, hand gallop) where manners, quality, performance are necessary - not quite so much of the  higher action as is needed in the English pleasure classes. 

      The National Show Horse is the Saddlebred/Arab cross (in various percentages) and is a recognized breed and they have their own shows and many show also in the AHR recognized shows where there are classes for the NSH, including the 5-gaited classes in some areas. 

      So, if you are willing to do your homework in pedigrees, you CAN track down Arabs that are a "natural" to want to gait.  There certainly are NSH horses that do.
       
      Teri Cox 
    • T Cox
      Sorry, I do not know of any such video. I also do not know of any farms that are trying to specialize in producing gaited pure Arabians - there is that old
      Message 32 of 32 , Jul 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
         
        Sorry,  I do not know of any such video.  I also do not know of any farms that are trying to specialize in producing gaited pure Arabians - there is that old problem at work - what - where - when is there a market for gaited Arabs?  
         
        If you have the time and the inclination, do some research on line.   Google - gaited horses, purebred Arabians, breeders of.....see what kind of stuff pops up.
         
        Also, if you can reach Carol Woodbridge Mulder - I know that she has e-mail, Carol is a top Arabian breed historian, she may be able to help you.
         
        I enjoy a horse that will gait - but I also very much enjoy a horse that can really use itself at the trot - so, if I were looking into the possibilities, I would look for a NSH - as many would be bred to be gaited, as in 5-gaited.
         
        Another way to approach it is to look at the Standardbred/Arab cross, I have seen several that were gaited and very good trail horses.
         
        On another note, I rode an Arab gelding in training today while his owner was here to see and ride him, and Rage (how is that for a name?) short for Fashion's Outrage, was racking for a bit when he was trying to figure out how to go from extended trot to collected trot during an exercise where there were lots of transitions - the trick is to recognize what the horse is doing under you, and then encouraging the single foot and the rack.
         
        Jim Porcher, of Blue Mesa Horse in New Mexico,  tells of his grandfather always teaching every horse he had to ride on the high desert range in New Mexico to "singlefoot", so that riding fence, etc, was not so difficult.
         
        The point is that almost any athletic horse is able to be taught - encouraging and developing the trait.
         
        Enjoying being back for a bit - tomorrow we put up hay - expect that the two fields will yield from 1,800 to 2,000 bales - won't have time to stop back for awhile.  At least we are making a dent in the needed 12,000 bales that the farm feeds each year. 
         
        Do have fun.
         
        Teri Cox
         
         
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.