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Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] hi tie systems

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  • Nancy or MaryAnne
    Are they like the Clinton ones tie blockers? If so they worked great!! Had them in the trailer, tied horse she pulled back didn t get the immediate jerk..
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 11 12:13 PM
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      Are they like the Clinton ones tie blockers?  If so they worked great!!  Had them in the trailer, tied horse she pulled back didn't get the immediate jerk.. 3rd time walked right in trailer. Love them have to be careful what type of lead line as some of them are really thick, and won't go through, and really narrow ones slip thru...  I have Anderson lead lines so I don't have any problems, most type of natural horse lead lines will work as directed.  Hope this helps
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Sue Tix
      Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2013 2:12 PM
      Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] hi tie systems

      I am thinking of getting 2 of these tie systems that mount on top of the horse trailer for when we go camping. Any experiences with these? I know there are at least 3 different systems on the market. Pros? cons? 
       
      Thank you,
      Sue
    • Janis
      Years ago, a young adult woman corresponded with me about acquiring an ex-racer Standardbred for her first horse. I always have suggested anyone wanting to
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 15 5:09 PM
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        Years ago, a young adult woman corresponded with me about acquiring an ex-racer Standardbred for her first horse.  I always have suggested anyone wanting to “save a horse” might start at a blooded horse sale because all the horses are registered and have a history the buyer can explore by talking to the breeder, owner, trainer, vet, etc.  Most such sales also have low-priced horses that sell early or late or when the stars of the sale are not on the schedule.  Killer buyers abound at these sales, and the cheapest horses are priced low enough for a profit, often less than they’d bring at the nightmare sales at Sugarcreek and the like.  So, the novice went to a blooded sale to get a nice gelding that had been handled a lot but was sound, one with a good attitude and conformation for her interests.
         
        But she left with a retired broodmare that had only been trained for basic handling to lead, trailer, and health care.  The mare was culled for not getting pregnant.  She was not a friendly mare.  The novice bought her purely out of pity since such mares are usually grabbed by the killers.  Novice was in way over her head.  I don’t recall how, but an experienced horsewoman and she found each other, and the mare changed hands, with the experienced one very happy with the mare’s response to training.  I hope the novice eventually got a suitable horse and think I may have been told she did.  I like a happy ending. Smile
         
        At any rate, there are many horses like this that go through sales, or lounge around someone’s back 40 because the owner meant to train them eventually but still hasn’t found that time, or partnerships dissolved, or a thousand other reasons.  I currently have two mares like this and am looking forward to developing them.  One is a stout little lady with a very sweet personality and ready to learn.  The other is an Amazon who has barely been handled but already understands I am the alpha, though she still thinks this might be negotiable.  I will be working on this.  Carefully.  They are not really seniors, nor barren culls, but someone else’s not-enough-time projects.  The Amazon is an outstanding girl I hope to get some racing prospects from, but I won’t breed her if she doesn’t yield.  I wouldn’t do that to my stallion. Winking smile
         
        So...there are lots of situations and traditions around the world that allow horses to grow up before training them for riding or driving.  Is anyone else on the list interested in discussing working with the more mature critters, including rehabs and salvage and any other unexpected treasures?  I think there are some FONF horses in the older ranks, but people are often unwilling to take on a horse they think may drop dead of old age.  My oldies have stayed the course into the upper 20s to 35, and I love old horses and old dogs.
         
        Please, join in.  I need horse talk.  My husband is on his 3rd bout of cancer and had a tracheotomy in January.  Currently, 100% of my time is doing all our farm work when I’m not helping him get better.  Horse talk, pleasepleaseplease.
         
        JanisCJ
      • Theresa Lawton
        Hi Janis, I’m very sorry to hear about your husband… sending healing prayers your way….. I’m very willing to talk about this subject of training older
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 15 5:40 PM
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          Hi Janis,

           

          I’m very sorry to hear about your husband… sending healing prayers your way…..

           

          I’m very willing to talk about this subject of training older horses, as I bought 2 pmu foals back in 2004 thinking I would be able to take my time and work with them…at least be riding them by the time they were  3 or so….  then life happened… These two are now almost 9 and I still haven’t gotten to ride them! I feel so ashamed of myself when I think about it. I know my 2 probably wouldn’t take THAT much time to train. I *have* worked with them, (just not lately)… I have been on their backs… bareback with just a halter…. I didn’t stay up there long to tempt fate tho.

           

          But anyway, yeah I’d love to talk about older horse training…. Maybe it will inspire me to get my butt out there and work with them!

           

          Theresa *I’m getting too old for this* in MO

           

           

           

          At any rate, there are many horses like this that go through sales, or lounge around someone’s back 40 because the owner meant to train them eventually but still hasn’t found that time, or partnerships dissolved, or a thousand other reasons.  I currently have two mares like this and am looking forward to developing them.  One is a stout little lady with a very sweet personality and ready to learn.  The other is an Amazon who has barely been handled but already understands I am the alpha, though she still thinks this might be negotiable.  I will be working on this.  Carefully.  They are not really seniors, nor barren culls, but someone else’s not-enough-time projects.  The Amazon is an outstanding girl I hope to get some racing prospects from, but I won’t breed her if she doesn’t yield.  I wouldn’t do that to my stallion. Winking smile

           

          So...there are lots of situations and traditions around the world that allow horses to grow up before training them for riding or driving.  Is anyone else on the list interested in discussing working with the more mature critters, including rehabs and salvage and any other unexpected treasures?  I think there are some FONF horses in the older ranks, but people are often unwilling to take on a horse they think may drop dead of old age.  My oldies have stayed the course into the upper 20s to 35, and I love old horses and old dogs.

           

          Please, join in.  I need horse talk.  My husband is on his 3rd bout of cancer and had a tracheotomy in January.  Currently, 100% of my time is doing all our farm work when I’m not helping him get better.  Horse talk, pleasepleaseplease.

           

          JanisCJ

        • Margo Nielsen
          Most of my horses have been older so I have gathered quite a bit of information on horses in their later years. Right now I have Romeo, a 30 something TWH who
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 15 8:16 PM
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            Most of my horses have been older so I have gathered quite a bit of information on horses in their later years. 

            Right now I have Romeo, a 30 something TWH who is not sound... working hard to keep him on his feet and keeping weight on him... Cherokee, a 23 year old gaited gelding, built like the older stocky TWHs or could be a Spanish cross... and Phoebe,  a 15 to 20 year old pony mule jenny, who was completely unhandled until I got her 3 years ago. 

            The geldings were trained... most of my horses have been trained, so Phoebe has been a real challenge, but we are making progress.

            Margo

             

            On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Theresa Lawton <cheyenne@...> wrote:


            Hi Janis,

             

            I’m very sorry to hear about your husband… sending healing prayers your way…..

             

            I’m very willing to talk about this subject of training older horses, as I bought 2 pmu foals back in 2004 thinking I would be able to take my time and work with them…at least be riding them by the time they were  3 or so….  then life happened… These two are now almost 9 and I still haven’t gotten to ride them! I feel so ashamed of myself when I think about it. I know my 2 probably wouldn’t take THAT much time to train. I *have* worked with them, (just not lately)… I have been on their backs… bareback with just a halter…. I didn’t stay up there long to tempt fate tho.

             

            But anyway, yeah I’d love to talk about older horse training…. Maybe it will inspire me to get my butt out there and work with them!

             

            Theresa *I’m getting too old for this* in MO

             

             

             

            At any rate, there are many horses like this that go through sales, or lounge around someone’s back 40 because the owner meant to train them eventually but still hasn’t found that time, or partnerships dissolved, or a thousand other reasons.  I currently have two mares like this and am looking forward to developing them.  One is a stout little lady with a very sweet personality and ready to learn.  The other is an Amazon who has barely been handled but already understands I am the alpha, though she still thinks this might be negotiable.  I will be working on this.  Carefully.  They are not really seniors, nor barren culls, but someone else’s not-enough-time projects.  The Amazon is an outstanding girl I hope to get some racing prospects from, but I won’t breed her if she doesn’t yield.  I wouldn’t do that to my stallion. Winking smile

             

            So...there are lots of situations and traditions around the world that allow horses to grow up before training them for riding or driving.  Is anyone else on the list interested in discussing working with the more mature critters, including rehabs and salvage and any other unexpected treasures?  I think there are some FONF horses in the older ranks, but people are often unwilling to take on a horse they think may drop dead of old age.  My oldies have stayed the course into the upper 20s to 35, and I love old horses and old dogs.

             

            Please, join in.  I need horse talk.  My husband is on his 3rd bout of cancer and had a tracheotomy in January.  Currently, 100% of my time is doing all our farm work when I’m not helping him get better.  Horse talk, pleasepleaseplease.

             

            JanisCJ






            --
            Margo
            View Margo's Architectural work at: www.nielsenhausdesigns.com
            View Margo's Animal Drawings at: http://anim8pics.jigsy.com/
          • Patricia Harris
            Hi Janis,   You are a saint.. both for horses and for your husband.    I wish I were closer.     I have five horses that I only love to pieces,
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 16 2:43 AM
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              Hi Janis,
               
              You are a saint.. both for horses and for your husband.    I wish I were closer.     I have five horses that I only love to pieces, but with whom I spend small amounts of time.    I care for my 94 year old mother, who needs me around as often as I can be.   I love her to pieces, but caregiving is exhausting, even when it is fairly easy. 
               
              A friend on another list is gentling a feral horse...just getting a halter on her has been a long, careful process.   She's small, and wants to be friends, but is terrified.   
               
              Can you send photos?   I'd love to see them.    And I am sending caring thoughts for your husband.    Such a horrible difficult challenge he is facing.   Best to you both,
               
              Tricia
               
              Patricia A. Harris
              From: Janis <jdjones@...>
              To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, April 15, 2013 8:09 PM
              Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Training Senior Citizen Horses



              Years ago, a young adult woman corresponded with me about acquiring an ex-racer Standardbred for her first horse.  I always have suggested anyone wanting to “save a horse” might start at a blooded horse sale because all the horses are registered and have a history the buyer can explore by talking to the breeder, owner, trainer, vet, etc.  Most such sales also have low-priced horses that sell early or late or when the stars of the sale are not on the schedule.  Killer buyers abound at these sales, and the cheapest horses are priced low enough for a profit, often less than they’d bring at the nightmare sales at Sugarcreek and the like.  So, the novice went to a blooded sale to get a nice gelding that had been handled a lot but was sound, one with a good attitude and conformation for her interests.
               
              But she left with a retired broodmare that had only been trained for basic handling to lead, trailer, and health care.  The mare was culled for not getting pregnant.  She was not a friendly mare.  The novice bought her purely out of pity since such mares are usually grabbed by the killers.  Novice was in way over her head.  I don’t recall how, but an experienced horsewoman and she found each other, and the mare changed hands, with the experienced one very happy with the mare’s response to training.  I hope the novice eventually got a suitable horse and think I may have been told she did.  I like a happy ending. Smile
               
              At any rate, there are many horses like this that go through sales, or lounge around someone’s back 40 because the owner meant to train them eventually but still hasn’t found that time, or partnerships dissolved, or a thousand other reasons.  I currently have two mares like this and am looking forward to developing them.  One is a stout little lady with a very sweet personality and ready to learn.  The other is an Amazon who has barely been handled but already understands I am the alpha, though she still thinks this might be negotiable.  I will be working on this.  Carefully.  They are not really seniors, nor barren culls, but someone else’s not-enough-time projects.  The Amazon is an outstanding girl I hope to get some racing prospects from, but I won’t breed her if she doesn’t yield.  I wouldn’t do that to my stallion. Winking smile
               
              So...there are lots of situations and traditions around the world that allow horses to grow up before training them for riding or driving.  Is anyone else on the list interested in discussing working with the more mature critters, including rehabs and salvage and any other unexpected treasures?  I think there are some FONF horses in the older ranks, but people are often unwilling to take on a horse they think may drop dead of old age.  My oldies have stayed the course into the upper 20s to 35, and I love old horses and old dogs.
               
              Please, join in.  I need horse talk.  My husband is on his 3rd bout of cancer and had a tracheotomy in January.  Currently, 100% of my time is doing all our farm work when I’m not helping him get better.  Horse talk, pleasepleaseplease.
               
              JanisCJ




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