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RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

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  • Rossin, Keria
    He sounds like he has been abused. Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn t want you scratching his butt but you persisted. Why? You are asking
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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      He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

       

      You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

       

      From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
      Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
      To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

       

       

      Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

      Hello Mr. Walker,
       
      I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
        First time:
      In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
      Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
      Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
       
      The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
       
      Okay, now for the questions….
      1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
      2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
      3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
       
      I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
       
      Thank you,


      I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

      Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
      someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

      **********************************************************
      Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues
    • Nancy or MaryAnne
      The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass sticks mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips,
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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        The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass "sticks" mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips, which really don't hold up, if you have to protect yourself, a few whacks with the fiberglass stick, will be a lot more effective than a lunge whip.  They used to sell them at tractor supply, and they have them on eBay.  A great tool to add to your collection. Nancy
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:27 AM
        Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

        He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

         

        You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

         

        From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
        Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
        To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

         

         

        Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

        Hello Mr. Walker,
         
        I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
          First time:
        In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
        Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
        Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
         
        The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
         
        Okay, now for the questions….
        1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
        2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
        3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
         
        I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
         
        Thank you,


        I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

        Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
        someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

        **********************************************************
        Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues
      • EVE HADLOCK
        Better suggestion is to put a bandana on a small buggy crop and use it as a flag. When the horse comes at you wave it in front of you so that there is no
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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          Better suggestion is to put a bandana on a small buggy crop and use it as a flag.  When the horse comes at you wave it in front of you so that there is no sting of a whip.  That can cause a worse attack especially if this horse has been abused.  We have done a lot of training of abused horses and this has worked great for us.  Good luck with your horse.
           
          Eve
          Sunarab Equine Services
          UTAH
           
           
           
           
          -------Original Message-------
           
          Date: 6/1/2012 6:46:03 AM
          Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses
           
           

          The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass "sticks" mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips, which really don't hold up, if you have to protect yourself, a few whacks with the fiberglass stick, will be a lot more effective than a lunge whip.  They used to sell them at tractor supply, and they have them on eBay.  A great tool to add to your collection. Nancy
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:27 AM
          Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

          He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

           

          You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

           

          From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
          Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
          To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

           

           

          Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

          Hello Mr. Walker,
           
          I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
            First time:
          In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
          Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
          Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
           
          The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
           
          Okay, now for the questions….
          1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
          2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
          3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
           
          I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
           
          Thank you,


          I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

          Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
          someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

          **********************************************************
          Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues

           
        • Laura Elrod
          I agree. I would keep it on me when being around your horse every time for now . Marv s Bonder is the place to start to gain respect! I just pull my lunge
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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            I agree.  I would keep it on me when being around your horse every time for now

            .

            Marv’s Bonder is the place to start to gain respect! 

            I just pull my lunge whip out now and my horse starts walking around me like he is going to school, lol!

             

            LAURA ELROD
             
             
             


            From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of EVE HADLOCK
            Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 1:59 PM
            To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

             

             

            Better suggestion is to put a bandana on a small buggy crop and use it as a flag.  When the horse comes at you wave it in front of you so that there is no sting of a whip.  That can cause a worse attack especially if this horse has been abused.  We have done a lot of training of abused horses and this has worked great for us.  Good luck with your horse.

             

            Eve

            Sunarab Equine Services

            UTAH

             

             

             

             

            -------Original Message-------

             

            Date: 6/1/2012 6:46:03 AM

            Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

             

             

            The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass "sticks" mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips, which really don't hold up, if you have to protect yourself, a few whacks with the fiberglass stick, will be a lot more effective than a lunge whip.  They used to sell them at tractor supply, and they have them on eBay.  A great tool to add to your collection. Nancy

            ----- Original Message -----

            Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:27 AM

            Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

             

            He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

             

            You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

             

            From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
            Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
            To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

             

             

            Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

            Hello Mr. Walker ,
             
            I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
              First time:
            In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
            Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
            Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
             
            The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
             
            Okay, now for the questions….
            1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
            2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
            3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
             
            I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
             
            Thank you,


            I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

            Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
            someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

            **********************************************************
            Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues

             

             

             

            No virus found in this incoming message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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          • Nancy or MaryAnne
            I don t like anything that is flexible. I have used this on a horse that was attacking, and guess what? He backed off. Mean what you say, or you will lose!
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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              I don't like anything that is flexible.  I have used this on a horse that was attacking, and guess what?  He backed off.  Mean what you say, or you will lose!
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 1:59 PM
              Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

              Better suggestion is to put a bandana on a small buggy crop and use it as a flag.  When the horse comes at you wave it in front of you so that there is no sting of a whip.  That can cause a worse attack especially if this horse has been abused.  We have done a lot of training of abused horses and this has worked great for us.  Good luck with your horse.
               
              Eve
              Sunarab Equine Services
              UTAH
               
               
               
               
              -------Original Message-------
               
              Date: 6/1/2012 6:46:03 AM
              Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses
               
               

              The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass "sticks" mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips, which really don't hold up, if you have to protect yourself, a few whacks with the fiberglass stick, will be a lot more effective than a lunge whip.  They used to sell them at tractor supply, and they have them on eBay.  A great tool to add to your collection. Nancy
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:27 AM
              Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

              He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

              You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

              From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
              Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
              To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

               

              Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

              Hello Mr. Walker,
               
              I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
                First time:
              In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
              Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
              Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
               
              The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
               
              Okay, now for the questions….
              1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
              2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
              3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
               
              I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
               
              Thank you,


              I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

              Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
              someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

              **********************************************************
              Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues

               
            • EVE HADLOCK
              If you want to be aggressive with the aggressivse horse then a plastic baseball bat works great too. Makes a lot o noise without hurting them. ... From: Laura
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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                If you want to be aggressive with the aggressivse horse then a plastic baseball bat works great too.  Makes a lot o noise without hurting them. 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                -------Original Message-------
                 
                Date: 6/1/2012 1:01:40 PM
                Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses
                 
                 

                I agree.  I would keep it on me when being around your horse every time for now

                .

                Marv’s Bonder is the place to start to gain respect! 

                I just pull my lunge whip out now and my horse starts walking around me like he is going to school, lol!

                 

                LAURA ELROD
                 
                 
                 


                From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of EVE HADLOCK
                Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 1:59 PM
                To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                 

                 

                Better suggestion is to put a bandana on a small buggy crop and use it as a flag.  When the horse comes at you wave it in front of you so that there is no sting of a whip.  That can cause a worse attack especially if this horse has been abused.  We have done a lot of training of abused horses and this has worked great for us.  Good luck with your horse.

                 

                Eve

                Sunarab Equine Services

                UTAH

                 

                 

                 

                 

                -------Original Message-------

                 

                Date: 6/1/2012 6:46:03 AM

                Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                 

                 

                The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass "sticks" mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips, which really don't hold up, if you have to protect yourself, a few whacks with the fiberglass stick, will be a lot more effective than a lunge whip.  They used to sell them at tractor supply, and they have them on eBay.  A great tool to add to your collection. Nancy

                ----- Original Message -----

                Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:27 AM

                Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                 

                He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

                 

                You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

                 

                From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
                Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
                To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                 

                 

                Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

                Hello Mr. Walker ,
                 
                I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
                  First time:
                In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
                Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
                Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
                 
                The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
                 
                Okay, now for the questions….
                1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
                2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
                3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
                 
                I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
                 
                Thank you,


                I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

                Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
                someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

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              • Marv Walker
                ... Even though the author titled the email aggressive horse she does not have an aggressive horse. An aggressive horse makes threats. An attacking horse
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 1, 2012
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                  If you want to be aggressive with the aggressivse horse then a plastic baseball bat works great too.  Makes a lot o noise without hurting them.

                  Even though the author titled the email "aggressive horse" she does not have an
                  aggressive horse.  An aggressive horse makes threats.  An attacking horse carries
                  through on the threats no matter how subtle they may be.  She has an attacking
                  horse, big difference.

                  When challenging an attacking horse the more noise and movement you can generate
                  the better.  If this horse pulled this stuff on a higher ranked horse in the herd the
                  victim would retaliate with every thing it had and wouldn't care a second whether
                  it took out an eye or broke his leg.

                  There really is little way you are going to hurt a horse by hitting them unless you
                  use a solid object and apply it to a bony structure of the horse - face, knee, etc.

                  The ultimate concept is the human MUST prevail.  It is in the horse's best interest
                  for the human to be the victor.  If the horse prevails it will likely be sent on down the
                  road where its chances are less.

                  If attacked, all bets are off.  Do what ever you have to do to stop the attack.

                  Marv "You have three seconds??  Bunk!  You have until you have to take a breath," Walker
                  Horse Info, Training DVDs, eBooks - http://MarvWalker.com



                • Charles
                  Another thought is that maybe letting him know you can hurt him is not a bad thing. The two horses that have bitten me (one ripped my jacket, the other left
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 3, 2012
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                    Another thought is that maybe letting him know you can hurt him is not a bad thing.  The two horses that have bitten me (one ripped my jacket, the other left me with a scar on my shoulder) never did it again because I started beating them back with a whip.  They never bit me again.  One is no longer with us, but the other is one I handle regularly and he doesn’t give me any problems. 

                    The trick is to stop before they see it as just abuse.  You will see a moment when their brain shifts.  Stop before that. 

                    Charles

                     

                    From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of EVE HADLOCK
                    Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 4:28 PM
                    To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                     

                     

                    If you want to be aggressive with the aggressivse horse then a plastic baseball bat works great too.  Makes a lot o noise without hurting them. 

                     

                     

                     

                     

                    -------Original Message-------

                     

                    Date: 6/1/2012 1:01:40 PM

                    Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                     

                     

                    I agree.  I would keep it on me when being around your horse every time for now

                    .

                    Marv’s Bonder is the place to start to gain respect! 

                    I just pull my lunge whip out now and my horse starts walking around me like he is going to school, lol!

                     

                    LAURA ELROD
                     
                     
                     


                    From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of EVE HADLOCK
                    Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 1:59 PM
                    To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                     

                     

                    Better suggestion is to put a bandana on a small buggy crop and use it as a flag.  When the horse comes at you wave it in front of you so that there is no sting of a whip.  That can cause a worse attack especially if this horse has been abused.  We have done a lot of training of abused horses and this has worked great for us.  Good luck with your horse.

                     

                    Eve

                    Sunarab Equine Services

                    UTAH

                     

                     

                     

                     

                    -------Original Message-------

                     

                    Date: 6/1/2012 6:46:03 AM

                    Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                     

                     

                    The only thing I can add, is that they have fiberglass "sticks" mainly fence posts that they put a lash on, I find them much more effective than lunge whips, which really don't hold up, if you have to protect yourself, a few whacks with the fiberglass stick, will be a lot more effective than a lunge whip.  They used to sell them at tractor supply, and they have them on eBay.  A great tool to add to your collection. Nancy

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:27 AM

                    Subject: RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                     

                    He sounds like he has been abused.  Also he was very clearly warning you that he doesn’t want you scratching his butt but you persisted.  Why?  You are asking him to respect you but you are not respecting his warnings.  And he doesn’t respect you at all.

                     

                    You need to start by establishing yourself as alpha but in a way that is not threatening to him.  Have you tried Marv’s Bonderer?

                     

                    From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Marv Walker
                    Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 11:08 PM
                    To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] Re: Aggressive Horses

                     

                     

                    Identifiers removed for posting to http://MarvWalker.com/horslist.htm

                    Hello Mr. Walker,
                     
                    I was doing an internet search on aggressive horses and ran into your site.    I am wondering if your video would be of help to me.   I have a 5 year old paint gelding.  I know he was starved a bit but I don’t know any other history.  When he arrived at our ranch 4-5 months ago he had food aggression which has since stopped.   He has “attacked” me several times.
                      First time:
                    In the pasture, he was grazing and I was scratching him and touched near his flank which bugged him and he threw me a look with his ears back and swung his head toward me and then went back to grazing.  I scratched that same area and this time his head came up and toward me quickly, I put up my arm to block/hit him in the neck and then he spun around toward me, knocked me on the ground on my back, he dropped to his knees and bared his teeth and came towards me, stopping just before he made contact with his teeth.  He calmly got back up, gave me a look and went back to grazing. I did not get up, I just sat there stunned and about 3 minutes later he walked over to me and nudged/nuzzled me and then went back to grazing. 
                    Middle times: he has charged me, stopping before contact, he loves to try to smash me into the corral panels and then brings his rear around as if he is going to kick me and has not followed through or I have removed myself . He also reared over me and bared his teeth coming down on my head but stopped as he made contact.
                    Last time:  I went in his corral to pick-up his fly sheet and I reached up to pet him while another girl was offering him a carrot and he grabbed me by my hair and knocked me to the ground.
                     
                    The strange things are that he neighs to me, to call me over, waits for me to put on his halter quietly so he can be turned out to pasture.  He is not dominating of other horses and is in fact scared of the other two that I turn out with him.  He seems to be irritated by something for most attacks but not all (ie scratching where he doesn’t want you too, interrupting his treat, putting on a fly mask if he doesn’t want it etc.).
                     
                    Okay, now for the questions….
                    1.        How do if he just has a screw loose (nuts)?
                    2.        How would I know if he has a hormone imbalance?
                    3.       Based on the information I have given, what would you recommend? (Don’t forget I am scared of him now).
                     
                    I live in (omitted) which is in (omitted).  I cannot find anyone willing to work with him , once I describe his behaviors.  I do have access to a taser…..LOL.
                     
                    Thank you,


                    I've addressed this on my site at http://MarvWalker.com/attacker.htm

                    Marv "He hasn't touched me???  Somebody needs to keep an eye on the referee because
                    someone is beating the daylights out of me." Walker

                    **********************************************************
                    Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues

                     

                     

                     

                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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