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Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Our very first trip out of the yard.

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  • Alexis Geiger
    This post definately needs a LIKE button!!!  I am not a big agreeier (If that is even a word) of all of the newfangled devices, gimics, devices that are used
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 1, 2012
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      This post definately needs a LIKE button!!!  I am not a big agreeier (If that is even a word) of all of the newfangled devices, gimics, devices that are used these days.  All I ever use is a smooth ring snaffle, simple reins, and a good fitting saddle.  I can teach a horse just about anything that is needed just by rethinking how these devices work and work with the horse on a simple give and take/reward system.  And ALLOT of the times it is done faster and is *set in concrete* because I don't need those to get the results I am looking for.
       
      ~~___(\
      .../< >\

      A Dog looks up to a man,
      A cat looks down on a man,
      But a patient horse looks a man in the eye and sees him as an equal.

      From: Marv Walker <Marv@...>
      To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2012 9:58 PM
      Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Our very first trip out of the yard.

       
      They are draw reins. I like to be able keep his head down if need be. How ever he doesn't want pull on my hands at all. He gives to leg already. We will work on headset later when we are more trail wise. The only real problem is speed trotting is as fast as we go and I have to keep leg and heal on him the whole time. So far we only go half a lap before we stop. He will not be a barrel horse. Western pleasure is where are headed.

      Draw reins don't pull the head down, they pull the head back and in.  If you get
      into trouble with the horse and you over use the draw reins you'll pull its head
      back to the point it will change his center of gravity and greatly increase the
      chances of him going up and over.

      To me, a better way is to teach the horse the head down cue and then simply
      tell the horse to put its head down.  Used in conjunction with responding to
      pressure you can place the horse's head where you want it.

      On the trail I allow the horse to carry its head where it wants.  The head and
      neck are crucial to maintaining proper balance and it need to be free to float
      as needed.

      Marv "Proper headset is proper when it's proper." Walker


    • kathysfullmoon@aol.com
      If you notice in the picture there is slack in the lines. I am not teaching the head set. It was his first ride off the property, we were riding alone and I
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 1, 2012
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        If you notice in the picture there is slack in the lines. I am not teaching the head set. It was his first ride off the property, we were riding alone and I didn't want anything to happen. So I had precautionary equipment. It is better to have too much then be caught a flat footed. First trip out went very very smoothly. He is going to be a western pleasure show horse. so I think it is important not to have any problems that I have to fix later. He already gives to leg pressure and seat shifting.
        Kathy in naples florida


        Sent via DroidX2 on Verizon Wireless™


        -----Original message-----
        From: Alexis Geiger <araven281@...>
        To:
        "MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com" <MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent:
        Wed, Feb 1, 2012 12:30:15 GMT+00:00
        Subject:
        Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Our very first trip out of the yard.

         

        This post definately needs a LIKE button!!!  I am not a big agreeier (If that is even a word) of all of the newfangled devices, gimics, devices that are used these days.  All I ever use is a smooth ring snaffle, simple reins, and a good fitting saddle.  I can teach a horse just about anything that is needed just by rethinking how these devices work and work with the horse on a simple give and take/reward system.  And ALLOT of the times it is done faster and is *set in concrete* because I don't need those to get the results I am looking for.
         
        ~~___(\
        .../< >\

        A Dog looks up to a man,
        A cat looks down on a man,
        But a patient horse looks a man in the eye and sees him as an equal.

        From: Marv Walker <Marv@...>
        To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2012 9:58 PM
        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Our very first trip out of the yard.

         
        They are draw reins. I like to be able keep his head down if need be. How ever he doesn't want pull on my hands at all. He gives to leg already. We will work on headset later when we are more trail wise. The only real problem is speed trotting is as fast as we go and I have to keep leg and heal on him the whole time. So far we only go half a lap before we stop. He will not be a barrel horse. Western pleasure is where are headed.

        Draw reins don't pull the head down, they pull the head back and in.  If you get
        into trouble with the horse and you over use the draw reins you'll pull its head
        back to the point it will change his center of gravity and greatly increase the
        chances of him going up and over.

        To me, a better way is to teach the horse the head down cue and then simply
        tell the horse to put its head down.  Used in conjunction with responding to
        pressure you can place the horse's head where you want it.

        On the trail I allow the horse to carry its head where it wants.  The head and
        neck are crucial to maintaining proper balance and it need to be free to float
        as needed.

        Marv "Proper headset is proper when it's proper." Walker


      • Marv Walker
        ... I hope you are not taking my comments personally. Draw reins cause more disasters than they prevent, No matter where you put a horse s head during a SUE
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 1, 2012
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          If you notice in the picture there is slack in the lines. I am not teaching the head set. It was his first ride off the property, we were riding alone and I didn't want anything to happen. So I had precautionary equipment. It is better to have too much then be caught a flat footed. First trip out went very very smoothly. He is going to be a western pleasure show horse. so I think it is important not to have any problems that I have to fix later. He already gives to leg pressure and seat shifting.

          I hope you are not taking my comments personally.

          Draw reins cause more disasters than they prevent,  No matter where you
          put a horse's head during a SUE (serious unexpected event) it can still move
          and a horse with its head locked up may violently struggle to find its true its
          balance.

          Do some horses stop when their head is in an uncomfortable position?  Sure.
          Enough do to make them popular for the purpose.

          As far as using them for head setting goes, they apply the same mechanics to
          all horses regardless of their neck conformation.

          Marv "Use what you can, toss the rest." Walker
        • Ladybug Ranch
          Hey there, Not knowing at all what draw reins do, what is the purpose of draw reins, and what do they keep from happening (from your previous post, when you
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 1, 2012
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            Hey there,
             
            Not knowing at all what draw reins do, what is the purpose of draw reins, and what do they keep from happening (from your previous post, when you say "I didn't want anything to happen")? I'm truly interested in their function. Also, does this mean you arre holding two sets of reins in your hands?
             
            From what I've read from Marv, if draw reins pull the horse's head back and in, that would cause the neck to arch, their back to hollow, and would throw off their center of gravity. From my experience, that only makes the horse harder to control.
             
            I'm working with a greenie of my own as well. She was actually sent to a trainer to have her started, and the first thing the trainer taught my horse was flexing side to side, then she taught yielding hind quarters, and then when under saddle she put them both together to get a one rein stop/hind quarter yield. When I started riding her, I too learned how to do this. The skill was put to use last Sunday when, on the trail, a small truck popped over a hill and my horse spun around and bolted. A one rein stop got her stopped within three strides. She is wearing a plain western headstall with a simple snaffle bit.
             
            Nicole in New Mexico
            Ladybug Ranch

             

            If you notice in the picture there is slack in the lines. I am not teaching the head set. It was his first ride off the property, we were riding alone and I didn't want anything to happen. So I had precautionary equipment. It is better to have too much then be caught a flat footed. First trip out went very very smoothly. He is going to be a western pleasure show horse. so I think it is important not to have any problems that I have to fix later. He already gives to leg pressure and seat shifting.
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