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RE: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

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  • April Garner
    Thank you all for your replies! I looked for just a battery I could hook up to my existing sump pump, but none of the stores I visited carried them or even a
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 1, 2010
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      Thank you all for your replies!  I looked for just a battery I could hook up to my existing sump pump, but none of the stores I visited carried them or even a sump pump with a battery back up…I just happened to be in Atwood’s when they were selling the last of their generators.  I paid $630 (tax included) for a 5500W generator.  Fortunately, we did not lose power so it’s still in the box.  I’m going to call Atwood’s and see if I can return the generator so I can afford a battery back up sump pump kit.  I know the generator may still come in handy, but until I have a wood stove in my house, I don’t see the point in having it just for the sump pump issue.  I won’t stay in a cold house…

       

      So thank you all again!!  You were all a great help!

       

      Thank you,

       

      April


      From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of EVE HADLOCK
      Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 5:24 PM
      To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

       

       

      Be sure you let the electric company know you are using generators also so when they work on the power lines they don't get backed up power through the down lines that your generator is producing.  It will electrocute the linemen. 

       

      We had a computer operated 30KW generator hooked up to our house, something you learn to not be able to live without.  When there was black outs we had plenty of power to run the house and every electrical appliance around.

       

       

       

       

      -------Original Message----- --

       

      From: Jones

      Date: 1/27/2010 4:18:23 PM

      Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

       

       

      April,

       

      We had talked about buying one for years.  After hearing friends in Florida and Texas  talk about the great value of having generators during the storms of 2004, I finally ordered one from Sears because they had more selection than local stores. .  At that time, the best info I found was an article online that explained the difference between the two power levels on most (all?) gens, plus a listing of appliances and their typical power use.  There are probably a lot of articles like that online, so you might want to check out a couple. 

       

      Important considerations #1:  think about all four seasons, the priority of use, and different weather, and uses other than emergencies.  If your sump pump gets a regular workout, it's probably at the top of your list (same here!).  For us, we can trade off water tank heaters in the winter against refrigeration in the summer.  We don't need electric for lights or cooking because we have multiple alternatives.  We could get the sort of big gen that switches over when the power dies, but then we wouldn't be able to use it at other sites, so that was also a consideration for us.

       

      I bought our gen in September 2004, and we didn't even take it out of the box.  Important considerations #2: learn how it works before you need it. LOL  Christmas Eve 2004, our day wound down with 50 degree temps and a torrential downpour.  Just before midnight, I heard the change to frozen rain because the temps had dropped rapidly.  And yes, boy, the sump pump was running steadily due to the heavy rain.  Fifteen minutes later  POOF, no more power till nine days later.  Yes, you can unpack and learn to use the gen ***really*** fast in an ice storm, but I don't recommend it.    Part of learning includes, "Where are those darned extension cords?"  We bought long, heavy-duty cords specifically for gen use.  Glad to say they were in their proper storage location.  Since that time, the one for the sump pump is run through the basement rafters and ready to plug in any time.  We use it a lot, you have probably guessed.

       

      I.C. #3:  make sure you have enough fuel on hand.  A heavy snow fell on top of the inches of ice, and we were unable to leave the driveway for several days.  No mail, no paper, no traffic...but we had cans of gas on hand because we always do.  By the time we could get out, though, we were getting very low.  Even if you can get to a gas station or delivery, keep in mind that fuel is sometimes unavailable during an emergency, including bad weather.  If the gas station runs out, they may not get their delivery on time.  Fallen trees, washed-out roads, traffic jams, and other problems that go with bad weather can cut off your gen supply.  That's one reason we use alternatives where possible, so we can be stingy with the gas.  I can cook eggs and toast for two, plus a small pot of coffee, with one tealight candle and part of a can of Sterno, and I cooked Christmas dinner (sure, it was only hot dogs) over a wood fire outside when it was 20 below and snowing. :)  In a pinch, though, I like to use the microwave, so I just borrow the cord from something else during that short time. 

       

      Another really useful tool for emergencies is a portable power supply usually kept in the car.  These run around $100 and usually can be charge from your car's lighter socket or household outlets.  They often have jumper cables, a flashlight, and outlets for AC devices, maybe even an air pump.  We have a couple, and they are lifesavers away from home.  At home, I use them to supplement the big gen for things like charging phones, running a notebook PC, etc.  They are also handy for powering a fan (the at our local horse park has no power and gets very warm), a string of Christmas lights on a parade entry, etc. 

       

      This looks like a good article from a trustworthy source:

       

      JanisCJ 

      ----- Original Message -----

      Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 2:36 PM

      Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

       

      Hi guys,

       

      It’s been forever since I last posted…We are about to get some really nasty weather…Freezing rain followed by 12” of snow…Last time we had an ice storm my basement started filling up with water, because we had no electric to power the sump pump…I’m considering buying a generator, but have never bought one before.  Does anyone have any tips on buying?  Like how many watts…don’t know what else to consider…LOL…I would greatly appreciate any advice!

       

      Thank you!

       

      April

       

       

    • margon (Clearwire)
      April, When the time comes (impending bad weather) again, or if you want to assemble a system piecemeal, I can tell you how to have a backup system for your
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 3, 2010
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        April,
         
        When the time comes (impending bad weather) again, or if you want to assemble a system piecemeal, I can tell you how to have a backup system for your sump pump.
         
        You will need a 12v auto battery ($70) at the very least (which could be recharged by your car, which is stuck in the driveway and an AC/DC power inverter ($80).
         
        A marine battery would last longer, and they make another kind of battery, AGM, which would hold a charge even longer.
         
        I am planning to get this set up for my well pump, which has a 1hp motor, which requires 780 watts to run and 1500 watts for the surge to start up. The inverter I am getting is 800 watts for continuous use and 1600 watts for surges.
         
        The charge for the lowest capacity AGM battery using 35 Amps continuously will last 20 hours. If your sump pump is 1hp like my well pump the charge should last much longer than that. In other words, you wouldn't have to charge it more often than once every 24 hours.
         
        Margo
         


         
        On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 7:32 AM, April Garner <april.garner@...> wrote:


        Thank you all for your replies!  I looked for just a battery I could hook up to my existing sump pump, but none of the stores I visited carried them or even a sump pump with a battery back up…I just happened to be in Atwood’s when they were selling the last of their generators.  I paid $630 (tax included) for a 5500W generator.  Fortunately, we did not lose power so it’s still in the box.  I’m going to call Atwood’s and see if I can return the generator so I can afford a battery back up sump pump kit.  I know the generator may still come in handy, but until I have a wood stove in my house, I don’t see the point in having it just for the sump pump issue.  I won’t stay in a cold house…

         

        So thank you all again!!  You were all a great help!

         

        Thank you,

         

        April


        From: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of EVE HADLOCK
        Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 5:24 PM


        To: MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

         

         

        Be sure you let the electric company know you are using generators also so when they work on the power lines they don't get backed up power through the down lines that your generator is producing.  It will electrocute the linemen. 

         

        We had a computer operated 30KW generator hooked up to our house, something you learn to not be able to live without.  When there was black outs we had plenty of power to run the house and every electrical appliance around.

         

         

         

         

        -------Original Message-------

         

        From: Jones

        Date: 1/27/2010 4:18:23 PM

        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

         

         

        April,

         

        We had talked about buying one for years.  After hearing friends in Florida and Texas talk about the great value of having generators during the storms of 2004, I finally ordered one from Sears because they had more selection than local stores. .  At that time, the best info I found was an article online that explained the difference between the two power levels on most (all?) gens, plus a listing of appliances and their typical power use.  There are probably a lot of articles like that online, so you might want to check out a couple. 

         

        Important considerations #1:  think about all four seasons, the priority of use, and different weather, and uses other than emergencies.  If your sump pump gets a regular workout, it's probably at the top of your list (same here!).  For us, we can trade off water tank heaters in the winter against refrigeration in the summer.  We don't need electric for lights or cooking because we have multiple alternatives.  We could get the sort of big gen that switches over when the power dies, but then we wouldn't be able to use it at other sites, so that was also a consideration for us.

         

        I bought our gen in September 2004, and we didn't even take it out of the box.  Important considerations #2: learn how it works before you need it. LOL  Christmas Eve 2004, our day wound down with 50 degree temps and a torrential downpour.  Just before midnight, I heard the change to frozen rain because the temps had dropped rapidly.  And yes, boy, the sump pump was running steadily due to the heavy rain.  Fifteen minutes later  POOF, no more power till nine days later.  Yes, you can unpack and learn to use the gen ***really*** fast in an ice storm, but I don't recommend it.    Part of learning includes, "Where are those darned extension cords?"  We bought long, heavy-duty cords specifically for gen use.  Glad to say they were in their proper storage location.  Since that time, the one for the sump pump is run through the basement rafters and ready to plug in any time.  We use it a lot, you have probably guessed.

         

        I.C. #3:  make sure you have enough fuel on hand.  A heavy snow fell on top of the inches of ice, and we were unable to leave the driveway for several days.  No mail, no paper, no traffic...but we had cans of gas on hand because we always do.  By the time we could get out, though, we were getting very low.  Even if you can get to a gas station or delivery, keep in mind that fuel is sometimes unavailable during an emergency, including bad weather.  If the gas station runs out, they may not get their delivery on time.  Fallen trees, washed-out roads, traffic jams, and other problems that go with bad weather can cut off your gen supply.  That's one reason we use alternatives where possible, so we can be stingy with the gas.  I can cook eggs and toast for two, plus a small pot of coffee, with one tealight candle and part of a can of Sterno, and I cooked Christmas dinner (sure, it was only hot dogs) over a wood fire outside when it was 20 below and snowing. :)  In a pinch, though, I like to use the microwave, so I just borrow the cord from something else during that short time. 

         

        Another really useful tool for emergencies is a portable power supply usually kept in the car.  These run around $100 and usually can be charge from your car's lighter socket or household outlets.  They often have jumper cables, a flashlight, and outlets for AC devices, maybe even an air pump.  We have a couple, and they are lifesavers away from home.  At home, I use them to supplement the big gen for things like charging phones, running a notebook PC, etc.  They are also handy for powering a fan (the at our local horse park has no power and gets very warm), a string of Christmas lights on a parade entry, etc. 

         

        This looks like a good article from a trustworthy source:

         

        JanisCJ 

        ----- Original Message -----

        Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 2:36 PM

        Subject: [MarvWalkerHorses] OT Bad Weather - Generator Info Request...

         

        Hi guys,

         

        It’s been forever since I last posted…We are about to get some really nasty weather…Freezing rain followed by 12” of snow…Last time we had an ice storm my basement started filling up with water, because we had no electric to power the sump pump…I’m considering buying a generator, but have never bought one before.  Does anyone have any tips on buying?  Like how many watts…don’t know what else to consider…LOL…I would greatly appreciate any advice!

         

        Thank you!

         

        April

         

         






        --
        Margo

        http://www.nielsenhaus.webs.com
        http://www.anim8pics.viviti.com



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