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Re: Aggressive Gelding

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  • Cathy
    Kim, THANK YOU so much for your advice! This is great... it s what I was looking for. I saw the Bonder a while ago, but I admit a refresher is needed. Also,
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 1 6:09 AM
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      Kim,

      THANK YOU so much for your advice! This is great... it's what I was looking for.

      I saw the Bonder a while ago, but I admit a refresher is needed. Also, thanks for the tips on "Ears!" I can try this w/o needing to go back to the roundpen for another go-around.

      It will be funny because I'm 5'4" and he's 17.2. Do you have anything on youtube showing it?

      I have to be careful too because he is a fan of jousting with other horses. I don't want to this to turn into a game for him.

      He's definitely a project. After this - I get to treat separation anxiety under saddle. Oh what a treat that will be. ;) I wish I had someone I could ride with where I'm at; it might be a little easier then. Or maybe not? Maybe going solo is a blessing in disguise because I have to figure out the trust issues instead of giving him the comfort of a 4-legged buddy.

      Cathy



      --- In MarvWalkerHorses@yahoogroups.com, Kimberly Martin <krenay76@...> wrote:
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      > Hi Cathy,
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      > Welcome to the group!!
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      > The first piece of advice that you are going to get from virtually EVERYONE is to try Marv's 'bonder' to establish some clear-cut dominance. I totally agree, and, when he is acting up in the RP, this is certainly a good exercise to go to, even if you are repeating it. To me, it sounds a like this might be a little bit of just a bad habit.... posturing out of reflex, for any number of reasons, with no real gumption behind the attitude.
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      > If you successfully complete the bonder and he is still is making faces at you, especially in the stall, you can show your dominance by 'poking' him until he quits. When I am out with my geldings, they sometimes forget themselves and pin ears at each other. I will reach up with 2 fingers and poke them right at the base of the ear and say, 'Get your ears up!' It doesn't take very long for a new horse to learn the routine and to figure out that I think the pinned ears are just impolite. After a couple of weeks, all of my horses have learned that if they even start that monkey business and I say, 'Ears!' they had better come up and their posture had better change.
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      > If you poke him at the base of the ear, he will probably reflexively quit with the lip, but if not, give him a light poke at the corner of the mouth to let him know you don't like that either. As soon as he quits, lots of pets (ESPECIALLY TO THE HEAD) and treats. If he bites at you, then you know there is serious intent behind the face, and you may have to ratchet up the intensity a bit.
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      > Making a little bit of physical contact with him should quickly sort out whether he is just putting on a show, or whether he really would hurt someone, and it is probably important for you to know one way or the other. I have an older gelding who pins his ears when I slide a bridle over them. Clearly, it isn't his favorite activity, and I am certain he has been eared down in the past (he has chain scars all over the base of his ears). If the worst thing he ever does is lays his ears back when I am putting a bridle over them, well, I choose to let that slide..... but I have poked his ears back up just to make sure he isn't going to turn around and take a bite out of me!
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      > Good luck and BE CAREFUL!!
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      > Kimberly
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