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Farrier nightmare ...Long

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  • Vivian Courtney
    Hi Everyone, I don t usually post, but am pretty upset. I m still shakeing from having my horses trimmed today. And this farrier comes highly reccommended
    Message 1 of 104 , Aug 31, 2007
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      Hi Everyone,
      I don't usually post,  but am pretty upset.
      I'm still shakeing from having my horses trimmed today.   And this farrier comes highly reccommended and is certified by BWFA.    First of all,  I had expected to get all 6 horses done and he tells me he can't do but 3 because he has booked himself too full for today and tomorrow he is leaving for Colorado for 3 weeks.   Well I did talk him into doing the 4 worst ones,   as I had waited for the past two weeks for him to come,  and they were all way over due.   The first one he does is Apollo,  my 10 month old  Appy gelding.    He didn't want to do it in the round pen.....he wanted to do it in front of the barn....(right in front of Apachie's stall while Apachie (yearling Saddlebred)  was nipping at him)   Well,   I tried to hold Apollo and keep Apachie from messing with him.   Apollo was being very difficult and the farrier was not very patient.   Well,  finally he took the rope from me and tied him to a post on the front of the barn....again in front of Apachie.   I told him he had never been tied before and he said well,  he'll learn real quick then.   He did use a quick release knot to tie him with.   He had a rope halter on.    Well Apollo continued to give him a hard time and got the rope loosened
      and fell down on his side......then the farrier tried to throw him on the ground by wrapping up his legs but it didn't work.   So,  he double wraps the rope around the post and  ties him again.   I am standing beside him trying to keep Apachie from messing with him and keep Apollo calm and Apollo came sideways against the gate trapping me inbetween.   All the time the farrier has ahold of his hind leg.   I squeezed out and got out of the way.   He got the hind legs done and starts of the front and again Apollo goes nuts and starts pulling back and gets a front leg loose and rears up and comes down on my left shoulder,   and then lost his balance and fell upside down against the gate and his back legs went clear through the gate into Apachie's stall.  Completely smashed that gate and the latch.   Now Apollo is hung with his head all twisted up in the air and he is stuck with his back legs in the stall with Apachie.   Now,  because he had double wrapped the rope around the post.....he can't release it.   He lets my colt lay there with is head pointing up and his air being cut off with that rope halter for several minutes before he got him released.   I was frantic.   He has small cuts and rope burns all over him.   He did get finished,   but I'm telling you,  it was devastating to the colt as well as me.   I felt totally helpless to do anything.      He did the three mini horses in the round pen and didn't have any more problems.   He acted like he does this to all his problem horses.  
      Needless to say,  I won't have him back to do mine again!!!    So I went out later today and got a rasp,  some nippers and a knife to try to do them a little myself.    Any suggestions on learning to do this properly will be most helpful.   I totally realize that teaching a horse to stand to farrier work is NOT the job of the farrier,   but I've had this colt done before and he did act up,  but he was never hurt or tramatized before.   This guy was in a hurry and just didn't give one hoot about how he got the job done.   SO,  does anyone in mid-Ohio have a good patient farrier that will come to Somerset, OH?  
       
      Thanks,
       
      Vivian
      "If you're not living on the edge,
      then you're taking up way too much room"


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    • Margo Nielsen
      Fantastic, Vivian! I saw that you watched all of Marv videos too. Over time you will find that you have absorbed more than you thought you did, when new
      Message 104 of 104 , Sep 12, 2007
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        Fantastic, Vivian! I saw that you watched all of Marv' videos too. Over time you will find that you have absorbed more than you thought you did, when new circumstances arise.

        If you keep up with it, it never gets to be a back breaker job. Since it is so hot and humid here all the time, I have developed a habit of neatening up the hooves just before I ride, after I have picked their feet clean. I only ride each (of 3 horses) horse once a week or so right now (because of the heat).

        The experience will come with time, and you will get to know your horses feet better than anyone else. With that knowledge will come some peace of mind knowing that your horses will be comfortable all the time, and their feet will never get bad waiting for a farrier to find time to come to your place.

        When I have a farrier come to my place, I line up a few other horses in the neighborhood to be done so it is cost effective for the trimmer (none are shod). It usually ends up taking 3 or 4 hours  for me to be there, and I lose a half day's work. When I do it myself, it is 10 minutes here and there, and just part of my regular horsekeeping.

        Also, once you have made an investment in the tools, you will save a lot of money that you can spend on other things. Every once in a while you will have to replace the rasp (especially if you leave it out in the rain like I do sometimes), but that is it.

        I have been using a TruForm Plane instead of a rasp. It's easier to hold on to than a rasp.

        Margo

        Vivian Courtney wrote:
        Thanks for that info,  Margo.   Also just thought you would like to know.......I used the rasp on my other yearling Saddlebred gelding today and did a beautiful job of trimming up his feet and he did really great with the method the Marv teaches on bringing a horse into compliance.   No rope,   no tieing and he stood like a champ.   This horse has been very difficult for the farrier before.    I've been studying all the information that has been sent to me on barefoot trimming.   I know I still need a lot of practice,   but at least now I feel like I can at least keep thier feet from flaring and breaking off.    I'm gonna get a hoof jack.....that will help a lot!!
        Thanks everyone for all the great sites and the encouragement to try this on my own.  
        I'm gonna tackle my mare tomorrow.    And thank you,  Marv,  for the bonder.
         
        Take Care,
        Vivian
         
        "If you're not living on the edge,
        then you're taking up way too much room"
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2007 2:29 PM
        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Farrier nightmare ...Long

        Haven't been able to send for a few days AGAIN! There are also 12" too.

        The 10" ones can be found at Jeffers Equine Item# N4-N2 for $18.49 in the Summer 2007 catalog. I'm not sure if it would be the same item number online.

        Margo

        Vivian Courtney wrote:

        Oh,  I didn't know they come in different sizes.   I have 14" ones too.   Guess I'll be looking for a shorter pair then.   Thanks for that info.
         
         
        Take Care,
        Vivian
         
        "If you're not living on the edge,
        then you're taking up way too much room"
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 10:48 PM
        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Farrier nightmare ...Long

        I do too...I've been using a 14" nipper and if I choke my hand up close to the jaws, the weight of the handles pulls it out of my hand...so I am getting a 10" nipper to see if I can get better leverage.

        I also got a sharpening tool at our new Tractor Supply store to keep them sharp. It makes a big difference in how much pressure you have to apply.

        Margo

        Vivian Courtney wrote:

        That is a great idea,  Margo.   Also,  I have trouble using the nippers with just one hand.   I have to just both hands to close them.....and since I can't hold the foot and close the nippers..... I have a very hard time doing it. 
         
        Take Care,
        Vivian
         
        "If you're not living on the edge,
        then you're taking up way too much room"
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2007 2:38 PM
        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Farrier nightmare ...Long

        Vivian.

        Although I haven't been able to afford one yet, a Hoofjack (about $170) will make it much easier.
        I am going to get a regular hoof stand for now (about $16) myself to rest their feet on.

        The best part about maintaining your own horses' feet is that they get very used to being handles and their feet never really get bad or have issues.

        Margo

        Vivian Courtney wrote:

        Thanks Margo.   I'll join this list ASAP.   I'll never put another one of my horses through that again!    I went out and bought a rasp, some nippers and the knife for doing their feet.    I was able to work on my yearlings feet a little.   It looks easier than it actually is,  so I don't know if I will be able to do them,   but I sure am willing to learn.   Thanks again!
         
        Take Care,
        Vivian
         
        "If you're not living on the edge,
        then you're taking up way too much room"
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2007 12:01 AM
        Subject: Re: [MarvWalkerHorses] Farrier nightmare ...Long

        Vivian,

        There is no excuse for the farrier putting you and your colt in such a dangerous situation.

        If you join barefoothorsecare@ yahoogroups. com  you can ask one of the local members to help you learn to take care of your horses' feet. There might even be a barefoot trimmer in your area (they are far and few between).

        Even if you're not up to trimming them yourself, you can do maintenance things in between trims that are no more complicated than cleaning their feet so you are never "desperate" enough to hire the quack that mishandled your colt.

        I kept Sadie walking for the last 3 years by trimming her feet while she was lying down at night. My other 3 horses just take it in stride. sometimes it's too much work to do all four feet at once...then I only do two at a time. But they never get really bad because I spend a few minutes every couple of weeks staying on top of it.

        Margo

        Vivian Courtney wrote:

        Hi Everyone,
        I don't usually post,  but am pretty upset.
        I'm still shakeing from having my horses trimmed today.   And this farrier comes highly reccommended and is certified by BWFA.    First of all,  I had expected to get all 6 horses done and he tells me he can't do but 3 because he has booked himself too full for today and tomorrow he is leaving for Colorado for 3 weeks.   Well I did talk him into doing the 4 worst ones,   as I had waited for the past two weeks for him to come,  and they were all way over due.   The first one he does is Apollo,  my 10 month old  Appy gelding.    He didn't want to do it in the round pen.....he wanted to do it in front of the barn....(right in front of Apachie's stall while Apachie (yearling Saddlebred)  was nipping at him)   Well,   I tried to hold Apollo and keep Apachie from messing with him.   Apollo was being very difficult and the farrier was not very patient.   Well,  finally he took the rope from me and tied him to a post on the front of the barn....again in front of Apachie.   I told him he had never been tied before and he said well,  he'll learn real quick then.   He did use a quick release knot to tie him with.   He had a rope halter on.    Well Apollo continued to give him a hard time and got the rope loosened
        and fell down on his side......then the farrier tried to throw him on the ground by wrapping up his legs but it didn't work.   So,  he double wraps the rope around the post and  ties him again.   I am standing beside him trying to keep Apachie from messing with him and keep Apollo calm and Apollo came sideways against the gate trapping me inbetween.   All the time the farrier has ahold of his hind leg.   I squeezed out and got out of the way.   He got the hind legs done and starts of the front and again Apollo goes nuts and starts pulling back and gets a front leg loose and rears up and comes down on my left shoulder,   and then lost his balance and fell upside down against the gate and his back legs went clear through the gate into Apachie's stall.  Completely smashed that gate and the latch.   Now Apollo is hung with his head all twisted up in the air and he is stuck with his back legs in the stall with Apachie.   Now,  because he had double wrapped the rope around the post.....he can't release it.   He lets my colt lay there with is head pointing up and his air being cut off with that rope halter for several minutes before he got him released.   I was frantic.   He has small cuts and rope burns all over him.   He did get finished,   but I'm telling you,  it was devastating to the colt as well as me.   I felt totally helpless to do anything.      He did the three mini horses in the round pen and didn't have any more problems.   He acted like he does this to all his problem horses.  
        Needless to say,  I won't have him back to do mine again!!!    So I went out later today and got a rasp,  some nippers and a knife to try to do them a little myself.    Any suggestions on learning to do this properly will be most helpful.   I totally realize that teaching a horse to stand to farrier work is NOT the job of the farrier,   but I've had this colt done before and he did act up,  but he was never hurt or tramatized before.   This guy was in a hurry and just didn't give one hoot about how he got the job done.   SO,  does anyone in mid-Ohio have a good patient farrier that will come to Somerset, OH?  
         
        Thanks,
         
        Vivian
        "If you're not living on the edge,
        then you're taking up way too much room"


        Upgrade Your Email - Click here!
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