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RE: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

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  • les robertson
    Hi, My name is Les Robertson and i ve been enjoying the many emails generated since I attended the 2010 reunion at Summit Point. This one is particularly
    Message 1 of 37 , Aug 29, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi, My name is Les Robertson and i've been enjoying the many emails generated since I attended the 2010 reunion at Summit Point. This one is particularly warming about the "bean oil" fragrance form Castrol "R" used in the 60's. Also the reference to an Opel Cadet being passed at Marlboro. My Dad and I ran an imported car shop in the 60's thru the 80's on Staten Island and serviced many of those cracker boxes. I also campaigned a "Kelly V" during the 60's and raced Marlboro many times.
      Thanks for all the great stories, and keep them coming! With best regards, Les Robertson


      To: marlboro_raceway@yahoogroups.com
      From: gtracer66@...
      Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 01:47:56 -0400
      Subject: RE: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

       

      Aloha David

         I used to use Castrol "bean oil" in my Abarth-Zagato 750, not for the smell or to cover up a smell, but rather because it was supposed to be better than the traditional oil of the early '60s. I had to special order it from the auto parts store in Frederick.

        I remember running my first enduro (a 4hr race at Summit Point).  There was an Abarth-Zagato 750 in the race.  About every 8 or 10 laps, I'd find myself coming up to lap him.  I could always tell that he was somewhere around the next turn as I could recognize the smell of the Castrol.  He was having a real battle with a Sprite and I'll never forget one of the most fun things ever was when they were going through "wagon turn" and I came up behind them.  One went wide and the other stayed tight and I was able to thread the needle and go right between them as if they weren't even there.

      At Charlotte in an IMSA GT race, Bruce Jennings and I did a similar thing going around the oval. Some guy was running an Opel Cadet   ( they ran a lot of different size cars in those races.. GTO & GTU).  Bruce and I were running door handle to door handle going around the banking.  We came up behind the Cadet, looked over at each other and opened up and passed him like he wasn't there.  Bruce stayed low and I went high. I remember thinking, "Wow! Just like a Petty and Pearson move"  LOL

        BTW, considering what gas is selling for on Oahu these days, you'd hope they were selling 200 octane fuel.

      Don
      Kailua


      To: Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com
      From: scshmoo@...
      Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 17:41:28 -1000
      Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

       
      Aloha  fuel watchers.

      We used to stand beside the track, as Sam did, and sniff the exhaust. It seems a fair number of cars were running methanol/nitro/benzol mixes and a lot of Castrol. The exhaust smelled like moth balls.

      I also heard about the trick of getting a Sunoco dealer to sell the straight 260 mixture.  Could that have been the "unfair advantage" ?

      Good high lead content gasoline gives a nice white or light gray exhaust pipe. I always knew my engine was running right when the pipe turned light gray.  The crap that passes for gasoline today produces a fluffy black soot that normally would mean an engine was running way too rich, but it is just the poor quality of gasoline with all the additives to "clean up" the exhaust.

      Best wishes,

      David

      Kauai
      On 27 Aug 2012, at 15:32, Don Haines wrote:



      I remember back in my early days of racing..(drag racing at the time) that the "trick" set up was (supposedly) to go to the Crown station and get a partial tank of high test and then go to the Amoco station to get more "unleaded" high test gas.  The ratio was supposed to be something like 75% Crown and 25% Amoco. This was reported to give a higher octane than either by themselves. No scientific proof just the word of the old guys who had been racing for years.

        By the time I got to Marlboro in '68, I had a Sunoco station as a sponsor and I ran Sunoco 260.  At that time, Sunoco had a dial that mixed a percentage of "regular" and 260 high test gas. They didn't dispense the pure stuff regularly to the public.  You needed to get the station guy to override the pump mixture dial to get the pure concentrated 260 gas. You could tell if someone was running Sunoco 260 because it had so much lead that the inside of the exhaust pipe would turn white. At least that's the story I was told. 

      Don Haines


      To: Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com
      From: rollingthunder78@...
      Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 21:09:43 -0400
      Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

       
      Sam
       
      I wasn't that smart.  I ran Gulf "Golden" gotten from the Gulf station about five miles North of Marlboro on Route 301.......
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 7:50 PM
      Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

       

      The hill above the fence belonged to Mr. Curtis - he charged $5 to sit up there <no amenities> - you could see cars coming out of the hairpin up through the kink and most of the way up to creek bend - plus Cappy's on to the oval There would be several hundred folks there during the Nationals 
      There was guard rail along the corregated tin wall as well - Hutch and I would lie down with our heads under the fence eye's closed to soak up the cheating E-Prod Porsche guys running methenol/acetone/keytone/nitro benzene/model airplane fuel masked by caster oil - I was never a glue sniffer BUT the E- Prod/H-mod races were always good for a buzz! 





      From: "David&Carol" <scshmoo@...>
      To: "Marlboro Raceway" <Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 4:57:30 PM
      Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

        
      It was a tin wall, or sheet metal. 

      It went up after April 1960 when the Marlboro owners got tired of the free riders who were viewing the races from off the property without paying admission.

      Behind the wall was only the usual Maryland woods. Mostly deciduous trees. The gate crashers took to climbing the trees to see over the wall. That was when the fire hoses came out.

      Drivers did not like the wall, because it was supported by phone poles on the back side. Several drivers lost brakes and went through the wall and complained later that the poles were dangerous.

      At that point  (after the first 12 hour I think) the pole location was marked on the front side of the tin with black paint so drivers could aim between the poles if they had to take the non existent "escape road."

      Best wishes,

      David
      Kauai
      On 8 Aug 2012, at 10:36, Yuccaseed@... wrote:



      I remember the track using fire hoses to get rid of non paying fans on the wood wall outside of the esses, I think there was a junk yard back there?
      Try that today..
       
      In a message dated 8/8/2012 4:29:32 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, slloydmarlboro@... writes:

      To all, and especially to Mike for proposing the idea THANK YOU! this hairpin discussion has been great! Perhaps we'll hear from more Marlboro veterans before too long. My brother suggested that we launch a program based on Mike's idea: Comments on the various parts of the track like we've been doing with the hairpin, but put them in order to "record a lap" at Marlboro. With some of the videos and stills we've got, combining the comments with visuals would make a helluva show, don't you think?
      Steve Lloyd, Historian
      Washington DC  Region, SCCA


      From: Mike <mikebooth1@...>
      To: Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com 
      Sent: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 6:09 PM
      Subject: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

       
      Driving home today, I made a hard left turn to get through some traffic, and as I was pulling the steering wheel I was reminded of the Marlboro hairpin. For a moment it was like I was there again.

      And I though it might be interesting to read some reminiscences from others about the turns at Marlboro--before we forget what they all were. 

      I'll tell you that I was always frustrated by that turn. I never felt like I ever got it just right. The only car I ever drove there was a Mini, and I was always fighting the fwd through the hairpin. Always felt like I was exiting the turn like a stone. For sure, my least favorite turn at Marlboro. 











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    • les robertson
      Hi, My name is Les Robertson and i ve been enjoying the many emails generated since I attended the 2010 reunion at Summit Point. This one is particularly
      Message 37 of 37 , Aug 29, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi, My name is Les Robertson and i've been enjoying the many emails generated since I attended the 2010 reunion at Summit Point. This one is particularly warming about the "bean oil" fragrance form Castrol "R" used in the 60's. Also the reference to an Opel Cadet being passed at Marlboro. My Dad and I ran an imported car shop in the 60's thru the 80's on Staten Island and serviced many of those cracker boxes. I also campaigned a "Kelly V" during the 60's and raced Marlboro many times.
        Thanks for all the great stories, and keep them coming! With best regards, Les Robertson


        To: marlboro_raceway@yahoogroups.com
        From: gtracer66@...
        Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 01:47:56 -0400
        Subject: RE: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

         

        Aloha David

           I used to use Castrol "bean oil" in my Abarth-Zagato 750, not for the smell or to cover up a smell, but rather because it was supposed to be better than the traditional oil of the early '60s. I had to special order it from the auto parts store in Frederick.

          I remember running my first enduro (a 4hr race at Summit Point).  There was an Abarth-Zagato 750 in the race.  About every 8 or 10 laps, I'd find myself coming up to lap him.  I could always tell that he was somewhere around the next turn as I could recognize the smell of the Castrol.  He was having a real battle with a Sprite and I'll never forget one of the most fun things ever was when they were going through "wagon turn" and I came up behind them.  One went wide and the other stayed tight and I was able to thread the needle and go right between them as if they weren't even there.

        At Charlotte in an IMSA GT race, Bruce Jennings and I did a similar thing going around the oval. Some guy was running an Opel Cadet   ( they ran a lot of different size cars in those races.. GTO & GTU).  Bruce and I were running door handle to door handle going around the banking.  We came up behind the Cadet, looked over at each other and opened up and passed him like he wasn't there.  Bruce stayed low and I went high. I remember thinking, "Wow! Just like a Petty and Pearson move"  LOL

          BTW, considering what gas is selling for on Oahu these days, you'd hope they were selling 200 octane fuel.

        Don
        Kailua


        To: Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com
        From: scshmoo@...
        Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 17:41:28 -1000
        Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

         
        Aloha  fuel watchers.

        We used to stand beside the track, as Sam did, and sniff the exhaust. It seems a fair number of cars were running methanol/nitro/benzol mixes and a lot of Castrol. The exhaust smelled like moth balls.

        I also heard about the trick of getting a Sunoco dealer to sell the straight 260 mixture.  Could that have been the "unfair advantage" ?

        Good high lead content gasoline gives a nice white or light gray exhaust pipe. I always knew my engine was running right when the pipe turned light gray.  The crap that passes for gasoline today produces a fluffy black soot that normally would mean an engine was running way too rich, but it is just the poor quality of gasoline with all the additives to "clean up" the exhaust.

        Best wishes,

        David

        Kauai
        On 27 Aug 2012, at 15:32, Don Haines wrote:



        I remember back in my early days of racing..(drag racing at the time) that the "trick" set up was (supposedly) to go to the Crown station and get a partial tank of high test and then go to the Amoco station to get more "unleaded" high test gas.  The ratio was supposed to be something like 75% Crown and 25% Amoco. This was reported to give a higher octane than either by themselves. No scientific proof just the word of the old guys who had been racing for years.

          By the time I got to Marlboro in '68, I had a Sunoco station as a sponsor and I ran Sunoco 260.  At that time, Sunoco had a dial that mixed a percentage of "regular" and 260 high test gas. They didn't dispense the pure stuff regularly to the public.  You needed to get the station guy to override the pump mixture dial to get the pure concentrated 260 gas. You could tell if someone was running Sunoco 260 because it had so much lead that the inside of the exhaust pipe would turn white. At least that's the story I was told. 

        Don Haines


        To: Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com
        From: rollingthunder78@...
        Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 21:09:43 -0400
        Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

         
        Sam
         
        I wasn't that smart.  I ran Gulf "Golden" gotten from the Gulf station about five miles North of Marlboro on Route 301.......
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 7:50 PM
        Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

         

        The hill above the fence belonged to Mr. Curtis - he charged $5 to sit up there <no amenities> - you could see cars coming out of the hairpin up through the kink and most of the way up to creek bend - plus Cappy's on to the oval There would be several hundred folks there during the Nationals 
        There was guard rail along the corregated tin wall as well - Hutch and I would lie down with our heads under the fence eye's closed to soak up the cheating E-Prod Porsche guys running methenol/acetone/keytone/nitro benzene/model airplane fuel masked by caster oil - I was never a glue sniffer BUT the E- Prod/H-mod races were always good for a buzz! 





        From: "David&Carol" <scshmoo@...>
        To: "Marlboro Raceway" <Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 4:57:30 PM
        Subject: Re: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

          
        It was a tin wall, or sheet metal. 

        It went up after April 1960 when the Marlboro owners got tired of the free riders who were viewing the races from off the property without paying admission.

        Behind the wall was only the usual Maryland woods. Mostly deciduous trees. The gate crashers took to climbing the trees to see over the wall. That was when the fire hoses came out.

        Drivers did not like the wall, because it was supported by phone poles on the back side. Several drivers lost brakes and went through the wall and complained later that the poles were dangerous.

        At that point  (after the first 12 hour I think) the pole location was marked on the front side of the tin with black paint so drivers could aim between the poles if they had to take the non existent "escape road."

        Best wishes,

        David
        Kauai
        On 8 Aug 2012, at 10:36, Yuccaseed@... wrote:



        I remember the track using fire hoses to get rid of non paying fans on the wood wall outside of the esses, I think there was a junk yard back there?
        Try that today..
         
        In a message dated 8/8/2012 4:29:32 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, slloydmarlboro@... writes:

        To all, and especially to Mike for proposing the idea THANK YOU! this hairpin discussion has been great! Perhaps we'll hear from more Marlboro veterans before too long. My brother suggested that we launch a program based on Mike's idea: Comments on the various parts of the track like we've been doing with the hairpin, but put them in order to "record a lap" at Marlboro. With some of the videos and stills we've got, combining the comments with visuals would make a helluva show, don't you think?
        Steve Lloyd, Historian
        Washington DC  Region, SCCA


        From: Mike <mikebooth1@...>
        To: Marlboro_Raceway@yahoogroups.com 
        Sent: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 6:09 PM
        Subject: [Marlboro_Raceway] The Hairpin

         
        Driving home today, I made a hard left turn to get through some traffic, and as I was pulling the steering wheel I was reminded of the Marlboro hairpin. For a moment it was like I was there again.

        And I though it might be interesting to read some reminiscences from others about the turns at Marlboro--before we forget what they all were. 

        I'll tell you that I was always frustrated by that turn. I never felt like I ever got it just right. The only car I ever drove there was a Mini, and I was always fighting the fwd through the hairpin. Always felt like I was exiting the turn like a stone. For sure, my least favorite turn at Marlboro. 











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