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is there anybody out there?..

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  • ecf1001
    Live long and prosper, All! Just found out about this wonderful board from a ML review on the net and already read the whole thing (the board), which I
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 7, 2003
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      Live long and prosper, All!

      Just found out about this wonderful board from a ML review on the net
      and already read the whole thing (the board), which I sincerely hope
      hasn't trickled down completely. Wanted to introduce myself:

      My name is Alex, based in Austin, Texas, finishing a BS in
      Mathematics and Computer Science, and an ML 2.5 with a full set of
      mallets is finally heading down this way, so I'm again scouting the
      net in excitement.

      As for background, I'm one of those jacks of all trades, masters of
      none. Played piano off and on since 2nd grade, then learned and
      played mallet & other percussion for 2 years in high school, more
      than enough to develop a strong affection for it. Made first chair
      percussion by 2nd year, albeit without much competition. After that
      resorted to being a musical amateur with ambitions for live
      performances, playing mainly bass and an assortment of synths.

      After years of being depressed over not being able to play a mallet
      instrument and generally loosing the hard earned skills I finally
      decided it was time to reunite. Having a long going obsession with
      electronic/electroacoustic music (being raised on the works of
      J.M.Jarre may have had something to do with that), and listening to
      the synth freak side of myself it seemed that I would get more use
      out of a mallet controller than a real instrument, especially since
      those controllers usually fall in the same price range as a decent
      set of vibes.

      A story very similar to Grant's, come to think of it. :) "Hitting
      things" isn't something you get with a synth keyboard or a computer
      mouse. The technique of using two index fingers in a "mallet fashion"
      on a keyboard, while fun at times, wasn't terribly useful and looked
      rather silly.

      Then I came across a mention of Buchla's ML and was awestruck. This
      is more than I dreamt for in a single piece of equipment. So here I
      am.

      I'd like to use it for everything it can be used for: an
      inspirational tool for composition, a standalone instrument, a
      performance controller for driving other synths and a sequencer,
      working with microtunings, etc..

      Looking forward to seeing life signs. :)
    • Grant Porter
      Hi Alex, Glad to have you on the list. As you can probably tell from reading the archives, we re not exactly a yappy bunch. But when there s a question about
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7, 2003
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        Hi Alex,

        Glad to have you on the list. As you can probably tell from reading the
        archives, we're not exactly a yappy bunch. But when there's a question
        about something, there's usually an answer.

        While reading your intro I started to think "hmmm... sounds a little
        like me." I think I know you feel about wanting to mess with everything.
        I haven't changed any. I'm still just a tinkerer. I picked up a Fostex
        digital multitrack last year thinking that learning to use it would
        inspire me to get some stuff recorded. So far it hasn't worked. The
        Fostex is fine, I'm just sort of in a lull. For some reason I was
        looking forward to a new software update for the Nord Modular Keyboard
        that I have. Then when Clavia cancelled work on it I sorta stopped
        messing with it. I don't know why though as it already does more than I
        will ever master. I think I'm jsut never content unless I'm messing with
        something new.

        I hope your ML shows up soon. You'll love it. It truly is a unique and
        versatile controller. Sit down and do all the stuff in the manual even
        if you don't think you'll need every function. It will make it a lot
        easier to understand in the long run. Programming the ML is unlike
        programming any other synth you've used so be ready to start fresh and
        think openly about problem solving.

        Poke us when you have questions or something to share. We're here.
        :)

        -Grant

        On Fri, 7 Mar 2003 5:52PM -0500, ecf1001 wrote:
        > Live long and prosper, All!
        >
        > Just found out about this wonderful board from a ML review on the net
        > and already read the whole thing (the board), which I sincerely hope
        > hasn't trickled down completely. Wanted to introduce myself:
        >
        > My name is Alex, based in Austin, Texas, finishing a BS in
        > Mathematics and Computer Science, and an ML 2.5 with a full set of
        > mallets is finally heading down this way, so I'm again scouting the
        > net in excitement.
        >
        > As for background, I'm one of those jacks of all trades, masters of
        > none. Played piano off and on since 2nd grade, then learned and
        > played mallet & other percussion for 2 years in high school, more
        > than enough to develop a strong affection for it. Made first chair
        > percussion by 2nd year, albeit without much competition. After that
        > resorted to being a musical amateur with ambitions for live
        > performances, playing mainly bass and an assortment of synths.
        >
        > After years of being depressed over not being able to play a mallet
        > instrument and generally loosing the hard earned skills I finally
        > decided it was time to reunite. Having a long going obsession with
        > electronic/electroacoustic music (being raised on the works of
        > J.M.Jarre may have had something to do with that), and listening to
        > the synth freak side of myself it seemed that I would get more use
        > out of a mallet controller than a real instrument, especially since
        > those controllers usually fall in the same price range as a decent
        > set of vibes.
        >
        > A story very similar to Grant's, come to think of it. :) "Hitting
        > things" isn't something you get with a synth keyboard or a computer
        > mouse. The technique of using two index fingers in a "mallet fashion"
        > on a keyboard, while fun at times, wasn't terribly useful and looked
        > rather silly.
        >
        > Then I came across a mention of Buchla's ML and was awestruck. This
        > is more than I dreamt for in a single piece of equipment. So here I
        > am.
        >
        > I'd like to use it for everything it can be used for: an
        > inspirational tool for composition, a standalone instrument, a
        > performance controller for driving other synths and a sequencer,
        > working with microtunings, etc..
        >
        > Looking forward to seeing life signs. :)
        >
        >
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      • ecf1001
        Hi Grant, Glad to hear from you and to see you re still watching. Thanks for the welcome. ... I sometimes have the opposite problem, as you may have already
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 7, 2003
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          Hi Grant,

          Glad to hear from you and to see you're still watching. Thanks for
          the welcome.

          > As you can probably tell from reading the
          > archives, we're not exactly a yappy bunch.

          I sometimes have the opposite problem, as you may have already
          noticed.

          Interesting similarities, indeed. Although my main problem with the
          creativity appears to be not the lack of new things but laziness.
          I'll think of something seemingly great and never finish it. It's
          similar to solving a complicated mathematical problem: once you see
          the solution, having to write it all up in detail is a depressing
          burden. Or writing a software project: you'll see the big picture in
          great detail, then think of every little subroutine you'll have to
          write from scratch - at this point my "this is great!" will turn into
          a "nah". No one to blame other than myself.

          It's a bad bad habit. It's one of the reasons I still haven't done
          anything with the all-powerful Csound and the book is collecting
          dust. By the way, if you're into tinkering alot - this is something
          you'll want to check out. It's free and absolutely incredible, just
          not realtime (read "unlimited processing power" ;). The book
          (called "The Csound book", available from Amazon) is not necessary,
          but is very helpful and it comes with 2 cd's of free but already
          collected and nicely organized goodies like GUI front ends, a library
          of tutorials, etc..

          I will be adding jmax to my arsenal, after learning about it from
          this list, and one of these days do something with both of them.

          And since we're talking tools, I saw you were looking for MidiScope 2
          years ago. Don't know where you stand in the midi department
          nowadays, but if you're still looking for something, I'd recommend
          checking out the MidiOx (by the way, I don't have links to anything
          I'm naming here, but Google knows where they are). To me so far it
          stood up to their claim of being "the MIDI eqiuvalent of the Swiss
          Army Knife".

          > I hope your ML shows up soon. You'll love it.

          My hopes exactly, thanks. :) I generally have a rule of not getting
          overly excited about anything beforehand, but it seems I've already
          broken it.

          Thanks for the advice. From just reading the programming examples
          posted here it seems that Don and Mark did an incredible job
          designing the programming interface, which only adds to the
          excitement. The stimulus-response system is a very interesting
          programming paradigm.

          Oh, and Joel Davel is playing in town next week! :)
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