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Re: [Marbling] Marbling Silk

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  • Jan Bond
    It s good to know that you can use Liquitex with water instead of the Marble Ease. I think I ll give that a try, as I suspected that the dull colors were from
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 24, 2002
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      It's good to know that you can use Liquitex with water instead of the
      Marble Ease. I think I'll give that a try, as I suspected that the dull
      colors were from the marble ease evaporating.

      Jan

      At 11:59 AM 2/24/2002 -0800, you wrote:
      >I have successfully marbled on silk for 10 years, using hand-rolled scarves
      >purchased from Thai Silk www.thaisilks.com. I dip them in a alum solution
      >and line dry. After drying you need to press lightly to get all the
      >wrinkles out, then marble as you would paper. I use carrageen for the size
      >(purchased from Colophon) and Liquitex acrylics (diluted to "splattering"
      >consistency with distilled water). The silk is actually easier to marble
      >than paper as it floats down on the size with ease. Rinse as you would
      >paper, then line dry. After line drying I wash them by hand using a silk
      >protein shampoo (silk is protein!) and rinse, line dry and iron.
      >
      >Silk does not like extreme changes in water temperature, so wash and rinse
      >using lukewarm water. By the way, the acrylic paints dry very flexible, you
      >do not even feel them after they dry on the silk.
      >
      >At first I only marbled on white, then discovered colored blank scarves and
      >the results were much more dramatic. Using only black, gray & white as the
      >marbling colors I laid the marbling pattern on the silk with the rich silk
      >color coming through.
      >
      >If the length of your scarf is longer than your arm reach, attach the ends
      >of the scarf to a very thin dowel. Hold the dowels with silk ends attached
      >up in the air and let the center of the scarf touch the center of your
      >marbling tray and then gently let each end down.
      >
      >d. guffey
      >
      >----- Original Message -----
      >From: "Susan Rex" <srex@...>
      >To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
      >Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2002 10:35 AM
      >Subject: [Marbling] paints
      >
      >
      > > I am new to the list and have spent some time reading archives but didn't
      > > seem to find the answer to my question. I see reference to Golden and
      > > Liquitex acrylic paints. Are these marbling paints or are these the same
      > > acrylics that are used for painting pictures? If they are painters
      > > arcylics, then with the liquitex do you use thick, medium or thin
      >viscosity
      > > and adjust them as necessary? The same question applies to the water
      >colour
      > > paints used for paper. Are these artists paints and is there a brand name
      > > that is quite reliable and available in Canada?
      > >
      > > I did try a sample with the irridescent Setacolor but realized my paint
      >was
      > > either too thick or my size not thick enough. However, the results I did
      > > get were quite thrilling. I use quite a bit of setacolor, for other
      > > projects, and was wondering if anyone has tried Pebeo's marbling colors.
      > >
      > > One last question. What about the hand of the fabric? Does the acrylic
      > > paint have much of an effect on the hand of silk scarves? I wouldn't be
      >as
      > > concerned with the hand of cotton.
      > >
      > > Susan - Medicine Hat, Ab
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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