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Goache

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  • J Dolphin
    I hear this paint suggested as a type of choice for marbling. What ever goache I have here simply has never brought me any decent results. So--I open a
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 17, 2000
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      I hear this paint suggested as a type of choice for marbling. What ever
      goache I have here simply has never brought me any decent results. So--I
      open a discussion on goache for marbling. And a niave question--isn't water
      colour a Type of goache?????
      Jill
    • IrisNevins
      Gouache is an opaque watercolor. The success or failure of the gouache depends on how it is made. They all have dispersants (either an ox-gall or
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 17, 2000
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        Gouache is an opaque watercolor. The success or failure of the gouache
        depends on how it is made. They all have "dispersants"(either an ox-gall or
        detergent/soap type dispersant) in some amount or other in the formulas,
        which is at the root of the problem. Some have more than others....so some
        colors spread too much and some too little. Windsor & Newton seems to be
        the most reliable brand, though the different colors have differing
        amounts, and even this is not consistent. One batch of Cadmium red may be
        perfect, then you buy it again and it has too much dispersant, spreads too
        much, turns orange-pink and makes all the other colors sink. It is a
        terribly annoying problem.

        Tempera paints, some work some don't for the same reasons. This is why I
        have made a 15+ year study of paintmaking for marbling(an ongoing, lifetime
        process!). I am not taking this as an opportunity to sell my supplies, but
        the best paints for marbling are made by marbling suppliers, where the
        maker is also an active marbler. Colophon Book Arts Supply in Olympia, WA,
        also makes an excellent marbling paint, originally developed by Don Guyot,
        now taken over by Nancy Morains. Our paints are formulated differently, but
        both work really well.

        There are always problems with any marbling paints because marbling is a
        tricky process. There are days where even with the right supplies, nothing
        works. Then the next day you do the same thing and it does work.

        Hopefully this will explain why people have problems with gouache. The same
        problems apply to tube watercolors for the same reason. The watercolors are
        more expensive and overall work less well than the gouaches. If you want to
        work with gouache, try the Windsor & Newton, people say they are best, and
        I would advise to stick to the traditional colors and mix others from
        them.....Lamp Black, Ultramarine, Yellow Ochre, Red Ochre, Burnt Sienna and
        Umber, Rose Madder, also the Cadmium reds and yellows work well. With
        marbling, chemical and physical properties of the pigments come into play,
        and many of the other colors will not work. There was a reason the old
        timers hundreds of years ago used these particular colors...they were
        friendly to the marbling process and worked well and mixed well together.

        Iris Nevins
      • Lavinia Adler
        Actually, I have had much better results with gouache paints than with marbling inks. I ve been frustrated for years with pale colors (even deep red turns
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 18, 2000
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          Actually, I have had much better results with gouache paints than with
          marbling inks. I've been frustrated for years with pale colors (even
          "deep red" turns out pink!) using well-known inks. Gouache produces
          strong colors for me.

          Because it's relatively expensive, I've just recently begun experimenting
          with acrylics and , so far, like the results. Unfortunately I have little
          time to play, so I may get to marble only three or four times a year.
          That leads to lots of waste as the marbling inks settle into a
          hard-to-stir mass at the bottom of their jars. The tubes of gouache and
          acrylics are still usable after months.

          Lavinia Adler

          On Thu, 17 Feb 2000 17:52:32 -0500 "J Dolphin" <jdolphin@...>
          writes:
          > From: "J Dolphin" <jdolphin@...>
          >
          > I hear this paint suggested as a type of choice for marbling.
          > What ever
          > goache I have here simply has never brought me any decent results.
          > So--I
          > open a discussion on goache for marbling. And a niave
          > question--isn't water
          > colour a Type of goache?????
          > Jill
          >
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        • John Ang Cheng Siew
          I too use gouache and watercolour with fairly good results. ... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ . .-P John Ang Cheng Siew My Paper Marbling Website:
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 19, 2000
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            I too use gouache and watercolour with fairly good results.

            At 09:18 PM 18-02-2000 -0500, you wrote:
            >From: Lavinia Adler <laviniaa@...>
            >
            >Actually, I have had much better results with gouache paints than with
            >marbling inks. I've been frustrated for years with pale colors (even
            >"deep red" turns out pink!) using well-known inks. Gouache produces
            >strong colors for me.
            >
            >Because it's relatively expensive, I've just recently begun experimenting
            >with acrylics and , so far, like the results. Unfortunately I have little
            >time to play, so I may get to marble only three or four times a year.
            >That leads to lots of waste as the marbling inks settle into a
            >hard-to-stir mass at the bottom of their jars. The tubes of gouache and
            >acrylics are still usable after months.
            >
            >Lavinia Adler
            >
            >On Thu, 17 Feb 2000 17:52:32 -0500 "J Dolphin" <jdolphin@...>
            >writes:
            >> From: "J Dolphin" <jdolphin@...>
            >>
            >> I hear this paint suggested as a type of choice for marbling.
            >> What ever
            >> goache I have here simply has never brought me any decent results.
            >> So--I
            >> open a discussion on goache for marbling. And a niave
            >> question--isn't water
            >> colour a Type of goache?????
            >> Jill

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            .
            .-P

            John Ang Cheng Siew
            My Paper Marbling Website: <home3.pacific.net.sg/~johnacs>
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