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Re: [Marbling] irregular skin on 1st color

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  • IrisNevins
    If the paints are acrylic based, I ll bet that s the problem.....taking too long to apply them to the size. Acrylic dries rapidly upon exposure to air. Perhaps
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 7, 2001
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      If the paints are acrylic based, I'll bet that's the problem.....taking too
      long to apply them to the size. Acrylic dries rapidly upon exposure to air.
      Perhaps thinning the colors out with some distilled water....and applying
      quickly with squeeze bottles (shake, don't squeeze) will do the trick.
      Apply a little extra color to get the same density. My acrylic and all
      others I have tried form skin if you wait too long....and it's a surprising
      SHORT time that this happens in.

      As for rusted pins, it can't hurt. thoug I must say my 23+ year old rusty
      rakes don't seem to bother anything. I am just too lazy to replace them.
      They were made with nails. The combs are extra long dressmaker pins.

      i.n.
    • sglenn@ctesc.net
      Hi, I marble on fabric using Golden Acrylics & methylcel. I recently experienced the same problem with the first color dropped that you are talking about (I
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 7, 2001
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        Hi,
        I marble on fabric using Golden Acrylics & methylcel. I recently
        experienced the same problem with the first color dropped that you
        are talking about (I think). I don't interpret this as a drying
        problem; rather, I believe that it is more a "compatibility" problem.
        The paint that is cracking along the outside edges of its rings
        before it is combed (the first one laid down)is a lot thicker than
        what it was laid onto (the initial clear one). I solved the problem
        by thinning my paints down more, just like Iris suggested. I think
        that all of the paints were too thick, but the cracking shows up only
        on the first & sometimes the second color laid down because they are
        compacted more than the paints that are laid down later and so the
        pigment is really stacked up on itself & loses its viscosity. Does
        this make sense?

        My favorite pins for comb making are "flower" pins or "daisy" pins
        found in the quilting department in the fabric department in Walmart.
        They are really long, they haven't rusted yet (been using this comb
        for 6 months), and they have a flat yellow plastic daisy shape on the
        end instead of a regular pin head that is perfect for hot gluing onto
        the board of your choice. You have to glue them on one pin at a time,
        but I think that it's worth it because they don't seem to rust. The
        comb is much easier to keep clean.

        Susa Glenn


        --- In Marbling@y..., Enid Adams <enidadams@y...> wrote:
        > Hi Iris,
        > Extra skimming does not seem to help this time.
        > I usually put color down with droppers, and it can
        > take a while. It is much more tedious to have to use
        > clear ink 1st but this was working to prevent the
        > problem until recently. I have tried whisks in the
        > past when this condition has happened, and still got a
        > skin when combing.
        >
        > I am wondering if I need to replace the pins in my
        > rakes and combs. Anyone have a source for very long
        > brass ones that won't rust?
        >
        > Is it possible that colors that have been sitting
        > around through a summer have gone bad, even if they
        > don't seem spoiled? There was a lot of talk about
        > cooling the bath, but do you ever refrigerate the
        > colors?
        >
        > I'd like to try a new bath today. Has anyone
        > experimented with the methyl cel/carrageenan mix?
        > Thanks for your help!
        > Enid
        >
        > --- irisnevins <irisnevins@c...> wrote:
        > > Hi Enid....I don't know what kind of paint base that
        > > is but if it is
        > > acrylic, if you spend too much time fussing over it,
        > > it has a tendency to
        > > form a skin in spots. Also, is it better if you
        > > extra-skim the size?
        > >
        > > iris nevins
        > >
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      • Laura Sims
        Dear Enid, I ve been thinking about your problem. Madly getting ready for another show and haven t been on computer much. The irregular edges is what I refer
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 8, 2001
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          Dear Enid,

          I've been thinking about your problem.  Madly getting ready for another show and haven't been on computer much.  The irregular edges is what I refer to as contamination which sometimes appears after I've marbled a while.  The clear, I assume your surfactant, can build up on the surface and create the described problem.  I know you said it helped fix the problem before, but you may want to try not using it or not using it first.  The MC from ProChem should be fine.  Did you by chance buy a new brand of ammonia. Make sure it does not have the word "sudsing" on it.  It's been years since I tried ProChem's marbling acrylics, but found them unsatisfactory because of pin holes and tendancy to streak.  However, their acrylics for fabric painting worked much better than their marbling paints. You may want to try a different acrylic.  Though I have not had a problem with chlorine (I use city water), the filter sounds like a good idea.

          When you skim you may want to try laying newspaper on the surface and lifting it straight up without dragging it over the edge.

          As far as temperature, humidity and air pressure, I have found acrylics to be very forgiving.  I have done my share of "exstreme" marbling in the cold and heat and have been able to get good results.  I would think that our climates are similar.

          I have just found a source for brass hat/lapel pins that are 5" and 6" long in a Rio Grande catalog.  If you buy 5-7 packages (12/pkg) they are $5.07 per pack...a bit expensize, but maybe helpful.  www.riogrande.com or 88-545-6566.

          Good Luck,

          Laura, Indigo Stone

           

          >From: Enid Adams
          >Reply-To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
          >To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [Marbling] irregular skin on 1st color
          >Date: Sun, 7 Oct 2001 06:01:56 -0700 (PDT)
          >
          >Hi Iris,
          >Extra skimming does not seem to help this time.
          >I usually put color down with droppers, and it can
          >take a while. It is much more tedious to have to use
          >clear ink 1st but this was working to prevent the
          >problem until recently. I have tried whisks in the
          >past when this condition has happened, and still got a
          >skin when combing.
          >
          >I am wondering if I need to replace the pins in my
          >rakes and combs. Anyone have a source for very long
          >brass ones that won't rust?
          >
          >Is it possible that colors that have been sitting
          >around through a summer have gone bad, even if they
          >don't seem spoiled? There was a lot of talk about
          >cooling the bath, but do you ever refrigerate the
          >colors?
          >
          >I'd like to try a new bath today. Has anyone
          >experimented with the methyl cel/carrageenan mix?
          >Thanks for your help!
          >Enid
          >
          >--- irisnevins wrote:
          > > Hi Enid....I don't know what kind of paint base that
          > > is but if it is
          > > acrylic, if you spend too much time fussing over it,
          > > it has a tendency to
          > > form a skin in spots. Also, is it better if you
          > > extra-skim the size?
          > >
          > > iris nevins
          > >
          > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >__________________________________________________
          >Do You Yahoo!?
          >NEW from Yahoo! GeoCities - quick and easy web site hosting, just $8.95/month.
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