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Got one to print!

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  • herrenfam
    Here, I got this one to print in vibrant colors using the Spanish Wave. I think I may have just messed up the surfactant qualities of my paint by combining
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 17, 2014
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      Here, I got this one to print in vibrant colors using the Spanish Wave.I think I may have just messed up the surfactant qualities of my paint by combining both Galen's gall and the GAC 900. Maybe I need to start my paints over again.One thing I don't understand is that I have to add 1/8 to 1/4 tsp of GAC 900 to a one oz paint jar to get the paints to float. Same with Galen's gall. Why is that?!? Is it because my original paints were mixed with hard tap water? (The carrageenan was made with distilled water)One last question: how many of you use droppers, and how many use broomstick? What difference do the two make in the final combed paper design?https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Marbling/photos/albums/845921062
    • Deluwiel Xox
      nice! I m glad you re having some success.  Warning: This is where it becomes addicting LOL  I use whisks or even old paintbrushes to splatter for small
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 27, 2014
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        nice! I'm glad you're having some success.  Warning: This is where it becomes addicting LOL  I use whisks or even old paintbrushes to splatter for small areas if I'm doing something in the neighborhood of a 22 x 22 bandana size piece of silk. For scarves or larger pieces of fabric I go with droppers or, more often, squeeze bottles. Droppers work well for me to do bullseyes or to lay the colors in rows. The squeeze bottles are great to just shake over the surface. I use those most often.  Try them all!  See what happens!
        On Thursday, April 17, 2014 1:44 PM, "herrenfam@..." <herrenfam@...> wrote:
         
        Here, I got this one to print in vibrant colors using the Spanish Wave.I think I may have just messed up the surfactant qualities of my paint by combining both Galen's gall and the GAC 900. Maybe I need to start my paints over again.One thing I don't understand is that I have to add 1/8 to 1/4 tsp of GAC 900 to a one oz paint jar to get the paints to float. Same with Galen's gall. Why is that?!? Is it because my original paints were mixed with hard tap water? (The carrageenan was made with distilled water)One last question: how many of you use droppers, and how many use broomstick? What difference do the two make in the final combed paper design?https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Marbling/photos/albums/845921062


      • George Reynolds
        One thing to remember is that there are so many variables at work when marbling that what works for one person might not work for someone else. Lets review:
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 28, 2014
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          One thing to remember is that there are so many variables at work when marbling that what "works" for one person might not work for someone else. Lets review:
          1. Temp and humidity of studio
          2. Depth and width of tray
          3. Hardness/softness of the water
          4. Make of the paint
          5. Amount of surfactant
          6. Type of surfactant

          And this is just for acrylic paint on carrageenan. Now in fact I have done demos in a few different places and the one that really seems to matter is temp. I always use distilled water when mixing paint and tap water for the carrageenan. But it could be luck that my tap water works. I really don't know. It might not work for you. That's why marbling is an essentially experimental undertaking.

          As for the amount of surfactant we need the input from a chemist out there but what's going on naively is that there are 4 components:

          • paint pigment
          • binder (acrylic)
          • water
          • surfactant

          The picture in my head has always been that you are giving each paint molecule a little boat to float in. So that means that there needs to be roughly the same number of boats as there are paint molecules - although possibly one surfactant boat can take a few paint molecules. It also explains why different pigments require different amounts of surfactant: if you have a fat paint molecule it's going to tip over the boat and its going to sink.

          Probably complete nonsense but hey it works for me.

          George
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