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Re: [Marbling] Pinch of Salt

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  • V. Wilson
    The article was not written by Margo Snape, it was written by Vi Wilson. The reference had nothing to with stopping the rapid decomposition in the hot
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 9, 2001
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      The article was not written by Margo Snape, it was written by Vi Wilson.

      The reference had nothing to with stopping the "rapid decomposition in the
      hot Australia sun". It had to do with the problem of the colours running
      off the paper.I have actually done some of my best marbling during the hot
      summer months.

      At the time I was not fully aware of the significance of buffered papers,
      which in hindsight was the cause of the problem. In postings of recent
      date, I mentioned that to combat the problem of colours running on certain
      papers, I simply do not leave the alummed paper lying around, but marble it
      as soon as possible. Problem solved. I have not added salt since I found
      an alternative way of dealing with the problem.

      All marblers find it necessary to adjust their methods from time to time.

      Vi Wilson
      Australia

      At 01:49 PM 9/9/01 -0700, you wrote:
      >> Margo Snape in an issue of Ink & Gall a number of years ago mentioned that
      >she started adding a pinch of salt to her size due top rapid decomposition
      >in the hot Australia sun. The article is entitled "Marbling with a Pinch of
      >> Salt" . i don't have the article, or the bibliographic info. Can someone
      >> else supply that?
      >
      >The article was in the Winter 1991 issue of Ink & Gall. It was in reference
      >to colors running off the paper, not the condition of the size. Anyway this
      >is what she said:
      >
      >"One day when I was deep in thought about the problem, I recalled a
      >conversation I had had about 30 years ago with a friend who was a technical
      >advisor for a dye manufacturing company. He said salt was a fixative for
      >color. I immediately added a small quanitity of common cooking slat to my
      >alum water and alumed some paper. Waiting for it to dry off sufficiently
      >seemd to take an eternity. I combed a pattern, laid the paper down, and
      >held my breath. When I lifted the sheet the color did not run--not even
      >when the paper was rinsed. I was elated!. I now add salt to my alum water
      >as a matter of routine in the proportion of one level saltspoon
      >(approximately 1/6th of a teaspoon) of common salt to two pints of water in
      >which I have dissolved three level tablespoons of aluminate sulfate."
      >
      >Hope this is what you wanted to know. All I know is that after marbling for
      >over 20 years I have found there "are no rules" what works for some doesn't
      >work for others...we each have to find our own solutions to our own unique
      >situations. This is especially true of the water content which comes from
      >our household taps. I've been told the best water to use is rain water.
      >But who of us has a rain barrell to collect it in!
      >
      >Happy marbling....
      >
      >d. guffey
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • J Dolphin
      As an aside to this, WHERE in Oz are you Vi? Jill
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 9, 2001
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        As an aside to this, WHERE in Oz are you Vi?
        Jill
      • V. Wilson
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 9, 2001
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