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Re: Tiger eye

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  • hagen_hsm
    You ll need to add potash, or potassium carbonate for your tigers eye. With acrylics I ve done it using the K2CO3 variety that s marketed for brewing and wine
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 9, 2013
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      You'll need to add potash, or potassium carbonate for your tigers eye. With acrylics I've done it using the K2CO3 variety that's marketed for brewing and wine making. I picked up a few pounds of it on Amazon for relatively cheap.

      You'll need to add a lot of it, and test. About one tablespoon per cup is a good starting point. You might also need to further dilute your paint with water, otherwise the eyes might just slide right off the sheet. When you switch to carrageenan, you might have to re-visit your measurements.

      Cheers,
      H.

      --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "leroymarbling" <leroymarbling@...> wrote:
      >
      > Does anyone know what to add to paint to produce a tiger's eye pattern? The paint I have is 5 parts GAC 900, 5 parts golden acrylics paint, and 3 parts distilled water with a bit of ox gall, and the size I am using is methylcellulose, but I plan to change to carrageenan eventually. I produced a black by adding a bit of sumi ink that I ground myself from a stick(sense their carbon black paint wont float. I also do sumi-e painting) to a dark grey I mixed from the primary colours, and this is what I would like to make the tigers eye solution from, if possible. I've been starting to marble shirts, and would like to be able to make the tiger eyes on shirts, if this is possible.
      >
    • leroymarbling
      Alright, I ll try it out. Though, like I said, this will go on shirts, so the paint will need to be permanent enough so the shirt is still washable and the
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 11, 2013
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        Alright, I'll try it out. Though, like I said, this will go on shirts, so the paint will need to be permanent enough so the shirt is still washable and the pattern shouldn't fade- much different than on paper. But I'll test it and see if it holds out.

        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "hagen_hsm" <hagen@...> wrote:
        >
        > You'll need to add potash, or potassium carbonate for your tigers eye. With acrylics I've done it using the K2CO3 variety that's marketed for brewing and wine making. I picked up a few pounds of it on Amazon for relatively cheap.
        >
        > You'll need to add a lot of it, and test. About one tablespoon per cup is a good starting point. You might also need to further dilute your paint with water, otherwise the eyes might just slide right off the sheet. When you switch to carrageenan, you might have to re-visit your measurements.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > H.
        >
        > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "leroymarbling" <leroymarbling@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Does anyone know what to add to paint to produce a tiger's eye pattern? The paint I have is 5 parts GAC 900, 5 parts golden acrylics paint, and 3 parts distilled water with a bit of ox gall, and the size I am using is methylcellulose, but I plan to change to carrageenan eventually. I produced a black by adding a bit of sumi ink that I ground myself from a stick(sense their carbon black paint wont float. I also do sumi-e painting) to a dark grey I mixed from the primary colours, and this is what I would like to make the tigers eye solution from, if possible. I've been starting to marble shirts, and would like to be able to make the tiger eyes on shirts, if this is possible.
        > >
        >
      • Barb Skoog
        Wait ~ you use plain potassium carbonate? Really? That s amazing. How does it differ from potash in terms of effect on the Tiger s Eye? I know there are some
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 12, 2013
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          Wait ~ you use plain potassium carbonate? Really? That's amazing. How does it differ from potash in terms of effect on the Tiger's Eye? I know there are some similarities between the two chemicals but it never occured to me to use just K2CO3. I've always used the fertilizer potash stuff. I like the idea of the more pure additive. Thanks so much for the tip! I'm going to try it out. (I use Golden/Liquitex acrylics on carrageenan.)

          Cheers,
          Barb

          BarbSkoog
          www.BarbSkoog.com
          Cheers@...


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        • Hagen Miller
          I had intended to use potash, but already had the other stuff on hand for bookbinding, so I figured I d give it a shot. I don t have a clearly defined formula
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 13, 2013
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            I had intended to use potash, but already had the other stuff on hand for
            bookbinding, so I figured I'd give it a shot. I don't have a clearly
            defined formula yet -- still tweaking it. The eyes come out beautifully on
            the size but still tend to distort here and there on the print. I'll try
            to get a good picture next time I give it a go.

            Whereas potash can have some caustic properties to it, the K2CO3 is
            strongly alkaline. I couldn't tell you the exact differences, but in
            theory the pure salt doesn't contaminate the carrageenan as much. Using
            this stuff, my eyes don't come out very large. It's a fine field of small
            ones, the largest ones being about the size of a nickel, maybe a few that
            are a tiny bit larger.


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          • Barb Skoog
            Thanks, Hagen. Helpful info. I do hope it helps with not tainting the bath so much. My K2CO3 that I recently ordered off Amazon is scheduled to arrive by early
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 13, 2013
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              Thanks, Hagen. Helpful info. I do hope it helps with not tainting the bath so much. My K2CO3 that I recently ordered off Amazon is scheduled to arrive by early next week. I'll let you know how it goes. Looking forward to experimenting.

              Cheers,
              Barb

              www.BarbSkoog.com
              Cheers@...

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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