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Looking for professional marbling artists

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  • IrisNevins
    Hi Cor..... I have gone to your web site and hoped there was an option to e-mail you privately, but it only sent on the form. I had wanted to discuss further
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 8, 2000
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      Hi Cor.....

      I have gone to your web site and hoped there was an option to e-mail you
      privately, but it only sent on the form. I had wanted to discuss further
      the limitations on reproducing early papers. The main one is that they will
      look fresh and new. Sometimes the colorations will be a bit different as
      well. You can read a little about it at my web-page which is linked at the
      marbling list. If you wish you can e-mail for my catalog and jpeg samples
      from there.

      My main work is doing the old looking papers, and can do all of the
      patterns, though I have had trouble getting the brown spot patterns as dark
      as your examples. The Spanish ones are generally no problem, the early
      combed ones, the pale blues, red/pinks, on white laid paper are possible,
      but they tend to have more of a pastel look when brand new. Some binders
      run them through a tea or coffee tank to "age" them.

      Where possible I make my paints with pigments used hundreds of years ago,
      but some pigments were either mined out or are considered too dangerous
      nowadays. You can mix close colors from other pigments, but they may not
      react chemically as the old ones did. The common Victorian papers with lots
      of red.....we can make the same shade of red but it doesn't act the same,
      so it's sometimes hard to get the dense overall coverage. Marbling is not
      so much an art as it is a chemical process sometimes! One must spend many
      years learning the chemical and physical properties of each pigment, and
      how they react towards each other. For that reason...there is no simple
      marbling paint "formula". Each pigment is treated differently always having
      to keep in mind how it will react to another one. And unfortunately most
      pigments are not "marbling friendly". So we are stuck with a small handful
      of those that work well with the process, and mix other colors from these
      as best we can. It is definitely not the fun part of marbling.

      I use a slightly off white paper that has a slight linen finish to it....to
      mimic the effects of oxidation for several hundred years. This helps them
      to look a little older. Or I may use a white laid stock on some of the
      above described early combed (Dutch, they often called them) papers.

      If you want further information, contact me, and I can always send some
      jpeg examples of what I have in stock that reproduces many early papers. My
      focus tends to be the papers prior to 1860, when marbling machines came
      into use. They seemed to have killed off that beautiful early look.

      Best,
      Iris Nevins
    • J Dolphin
      This is certainly a tall order I would think. They are certainly handsome papers. I d be interested in the list members voicing their opinions on just how you
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 8, 2000
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        This is certainly a tall order I would think. They are certainly
        handsome papers. I'd be interested in the list members voicing their
        opinions on just how you would go about this and if anyone will take on this
        job. I even have to ask--what type of contract would you be setting up with
        them.
        Out of curiousity--WHAT type of paper is holding those beautiful colours
        together?
        Jill


        >From: "Cor Knops" <knops@...>
        >
        >
        >
        >Hello,
        >
        >My name is Cor Knops (book- and paperrestorer) and I'm looking
        >for people who are capable of making marbled papers using
        >historical examples
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