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Hatip ebru

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  • anthonianthonianthoni
    Most of The terms in ebru for patterns have their equivalents in English. However, there is one type of pattern, known as hatip ebru, which seems to be unique
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 21, 2012
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      Most of The terms in ebru for patterns have their equivalents in English. However, there is one type of pattern, known as hatip ebru, which seems to be unique to Turkish ebru. It's name also seems to be unique, as I know of no English term for it.
      Does any equivilant term for this pattern exist in English? Or do we use the Turkish name, like the gelgit?
    • jemiljan
      Anthoni, The term Hatip is exclusively used in Turkey, despite the fact that marbled motifs are a common feature throughout India and Iran as well. Simple
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 25, 2012
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        Anthoni,

        The term "Hatip" is exclusively used in Turkey, despite the fact that marbled motifs are a common feature throughout India and Iran as well. Simple bisected spots of color, creating "heart" or "leaf" motifs, are found quite early the 16th century. More complex examples can be found by the turn of the 16th/17th century in Iran and India as well. One calligraphy panel sold at auction several years ago signed by Ali Riza Abbasi (flourished ~1596-1517) is written over cloud bands of composed of small marbled 'clouds' filled with motifs.

        The idea that an 18th century Turkish man named Mehmet Effendi, who was the Hatip or 'Hatib' (from the Arabic 'khatib', meaning a preacher or orator, typically one who delivers the sermon at Islamic Friday congregational prayers) of the Aya Sofya mosque had invented these patterns is not really true. He was probably just very good at making them, and made some innovative motifs, but he wasn't the first to make them at all. I think that to call them "marbled motifs" in English is entirely suitable, and you will find that references to "hatip motifs" as well.

        Also, what is called 'gelgit' in Turkish has been called 'drawn' in English, and 'chevron' in French. It is only in recent years that the Turkish word has come into fashion among English-speaking marblers.

        Best,

        Jake Benson


        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "anthonianthonianthoni" <anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:
        >
        > Most of The terms in ebru for patterns have their equivalents in English. However, there is one type of pattern, known as hatip ebru, which seems to be unique to Turkish ebru. It's name also seems to be unique, as I know of no English term for it.
        > Does any equivilant term for this pattern exist in English? Or do we use the Turkish name, like the gelgit?
        >
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