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green problem

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  • Sue Cole
    I believe it is the ochre that is causing your problem - that is an earth pigment and is heavy. Swith to a different yellow and see what happens. Usually the
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 17, 2012
      I believe it is the ochre that is causing your problem - that is an earth
      pigment and is heavy. Swith to a different yellow and see what happens.
      Usually the pthalo blues and greens that I have ever used spread almost TOO
      readily - they seem to have more surfactant in them than other colors for
      some reason.

      Try an Azo yellow or quinacridone gold if you can get it.
      Sue


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • irisnevins
      The ochre works just fine for me. It s what the manufacturer is doing to the pigments. Keep in mind most paints people use are not made specifically for
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 17, 2012
        The ochre works just fine for me. It's what the manufacturer is doing to the pigments. Keep in mind most paints people use are not made specifically for marbling but for other uses. A few of us make paint for marbling and there is no problem with the green or yellows mentioned.

        Iris Nevins
        Www.marblingpaper.com

        On Mar 17, 2012, at 11:28 PM, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:

        > I believe it is the ochre that is causing your problem - that is an earth
        > pigment and is heavy. Swith to a different yellow and see what happens.
        > Usually the pthalo blues and greens that I have ever used spread almost TOO
        > readily - they seem to have more surfactant in them than other colors for
        > some reason.
        >
        > Try an Azo yellow or quinacridone gold if you can get it.
        > Sue
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • anthonianthonianthoni
        the paint is a gouache made by daler -roweny, an English maker.The yellow ochre used to work fine,but as of late, it appears to have become denser.
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 18, 2012
          the paint is a gouache made by daler -roweny, an English maker.The yellow ochre used to work fine,but as of late, it appears to have become denser.



          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, irisnevins <irisnevins@...> wrote:
          >
          > The ochre works just fine for me. It's what the manufacturer is doing to the pigments. Keep in mind most paints people use are not made specifically for marbling but for other uses. A few of us make paint for marbling and there is no problem with the green or yellows mentioned.
          >
          > Iris Nevins
          > Www.marblingpaper.com
          >
          > On Mar 17, 2012, at 11:28 PM, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I believe it is the ochre that is causing your problem - that is an earth
          > > pigment and is heavy. Swith to a different yellow and see what happens.
          > > Usually the pthalo blues and greens that I have ever used spread almost TOO
          > > readily - they seem to have more surfactant in them than other colors for
          > > some reason.
          > >
          > > Try an Azo yellow or quinacridone gold if you can get it.
          > > Sue
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • irisnevins
          Paint companies are always improving things for artists in general and ruining things for marblers. Too thick, water it down... try anything. If you find a
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 18, 2012
            Paint companies are always "improving" things for artists in general and ruining things for marblers. Too thick, water it down... try anything. If you find a paint you like, take down the lot number and buy as much of that lot as possible.

            Iris Nevins
            www.marblingpaper.com



            On 03/18/12, anthonianthonianthoni<anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:

            the paint is a gouache made by daler -roweny, an English maker.The yellow ochre used to work fine,but as of late, it appears to have become denser.



            --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, irisnevins <irisnevins@...> wrote:
            >
            > The ochre works just fine for me. It's what the manufacturer is doing to the pigments. Keep in mind most paints people use are not made specifically for marbling but for other uses. A few of us make paint for marbling and there is no problem with the green or yellows mentioned.
            >
            > Iris Nevins
            > Www.marblingpaper.com
            >
            > On Mar 17, 2012, at 11:28 PM, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I believe it is the ochre that is causing your problem - that is an earth
            > > pigment and is heavy. Swith to a different yellow and see what happens.
            > > Usually the pthalo blues and greens that I have ever used spread almost TOO
            > > readily - they seem to have more surfactant in them than other colors for
            > > some reason.
            > >
            > > Try an Azo yellow or quinacridone gold if you can get it.
            > > Sue
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >




            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • kathryn fanelli
            Marbling folks,   Wrinkled papers after drying, hot ironing not working, pressing with weights helping a bit....would spraying the backside lightly and then
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 20, 2012
              Marbling folks,
               
              Wrinkled papers after drying, hot ironing not working, pressing with weights helping a bit....would spraying the backside lightly and then repressing with heavy boards work?? What's the time it may take? What to do in a rush to flatten dried work? Will the heavier the weight the faster the flattening?

              Thank you in advance.
               
              Kathryn 





              ________________________________
              From: irisnevins <irisnevins@...>
              To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, March 18, 2012 2:04 PM
              Subject: Re: [Marbling] Re: green problem


               
              Paint companies are always "improving" things for artists in general and ruining things for marblers. Too thick, water it down... try anything. If you find a paint you like, take down the lot number and buy as much of that lot as possible.

              Iris Nevins
              www.marblingpaper.com

              On 03/18/12, anthonianthonianthoni<anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:

              the paint is a gouache made by daler -roweny, an English maker.The yellow ochre used to work fine,but as of late, it appears to have become denser.

              --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, irisnevins <irisnevins@...> wrote:
              >
              > The ochre works just fine for me. It's what the manufacturer is doing to the pigments. Keep in mind most paints people use are not made specifically for marbling but for other uses. A few of us make paint for marbling and there is no problem with the green or yellows mentioned.
              >
              > Iris Nevins
              > Www.marblingpaper.com
              >
              > On Mar 17, 2012, at 11:28 PM, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:
              >
              > > I believe it is the ochre that is causing your problem - that is an earth
              > > pigment and is heavy. Swith to a different yellow and see what happens.
              > > Usually the pthalo blues and greens that I have ever used spread almost TOO
              > > readily - they seem to have more surfactant in them than other colors for
              > > some reason.
              > >
              > > Try an Azo yellow or quinacridone gold if you can get it.
              > > Sue
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >

              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
              Kathryn, whatever you do, don t iron! It damages the hydrogen bonds of the paper. If your papers are too wrinkled or warped for pressing to do the trick, roll
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 20, 2012
                Kathryn,

                whatever you do, don't iron! It damages the hydrogen bonds of the paper.

                If your papers are too wrinkled or warped for pressing to do the trick, roll them up (face outwards!!) alongside the grain direction in packs of max. 15 to 20 and let them sit for a day or so. Then press, but gently, don't stifle them. If that doesn't help, use them for gift wrappers and reconsider your methods and materials.

                Susanne Krause
              • kumqtmay@bellsouth.net
                Lightly spraying the backside of papers with a mist of water & then pressing with weights usually helps rid your papers of wrinkles. But this is not a quick
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 21, 2012
                  Lightly spraying the backside of papers with a mist of water & then pressing with weights usually helps rid your papers of wrinkles. But this is not a quick method! Putting the paper between damp papers will sometimes straighten the errant paper. In my experience, ironing is a disaster & to be avoided. Good luck!
                • irisnevins
                  I don t get wrinkles, never did. Is your paper very thin perhaps? What I do get is curl at the bottom, up halfway on the sheet, since they are hung with
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 21, 2012
                    I don't get wrinkles, never did. Is your paper very thin perhaps? What I do get is "curl" at the bottom, up halfway on the sheet, since they are hung with clothespins on a line. I take a group of maybe 8-12 face down, roll the curls in reverse, then put under boards overnight. They are never totally flat like they were before marbling, but flat enough for use for any purpose, no wrinkles. I have though, way in the past, laid them on newsprint, then put more over, and ironed gently though. I still have some of those papers with no ill effects after 34 years. Still, consider what Susanne says. I just found the rolling and stacking to be every bit as good as ironing and I am lazy and don't do unnecessary work if I don't have to. I never did however, have an ironing disaster, not done the way I did it. It just took too much time, but I imagine too much heat is bad for the paper. Think about the victorian machine marbled papers though, they were glazed in high temperature friction machines of some sort, and if you ever hand polished a paper, it gets pretty hot. Not like an iron on high though.

                    Iris Nevins
                    ww,marblingpaper.com



                    On 03/21/12, kumqtmay@...<seenmymarbles@...> wrote:


                    Lightly spraying the backside of papers with a mist of water & then pressing with weights usually helps rid your papers of wrinkles. But this is not a quick method! Putting the paper between damp papers will sometimes straighten the errant paper. In my experience, ironing is a disaster & to be avoided. Good luck!



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                  • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
                    ... that s why I ve suggested to reconsider materials and techniques. If both are correct, the problem is next to non-existant, even with paste papers. The ill
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 21, 2012
                      ... that's why I've suggested to reconsider materials and techniques. If both are correct, the problem is next to non-existant, even with paste papers.

                      The ill effects of ironing don't show immediately except with very high temperature and much pressure. However, it's a long term phenomenon and one of the reasons for the deplorable state of many industrial produced glossy 19th century papers.

                      Susanne Krause
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