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Re: [Marbling] Re: Reproducing old papers

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  • irisnevins
    Hi Anthony The problem is that generally the manufacturer puts in a dispersant before you add ox-gall. Sometimes you need none for the tubes. I found way back
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 17, 2012
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      Hi Anthony

      The problem is that generally the manufacturer puts in a dispersant before you add ox-gall. Sometimes you need none for the tubes. I found way back when I used tubes or gouache or watercolor, that it would vary from batch to batch, the amount of dispersant, and thus, spread. There is no way to know what they use, but I would bet money on a detergent type, due to sluggish spread and TOO MUCH spread! I suspect that is the case with the Prussian Blue you are using. Try a different brand and see what happens. Some pigments naturally spread more. I use little and sometimes no gall in my Rose Madder for example.

      You could try to mix the blue with some black if that spreads less, and get a nice navy blue?
      Iris Nevins
      www.marblingpaper.com


      On 01/16/12, anthonianthonianthoni<anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:

      The paint in question is red artist's watercolour. The dispersant is gall ( bovine) and the dilutent, water.

      Also, when I marble nonpareil, I use prussian blue, but the blue spreads so much , that every colour is pushed out of the way.




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    • anthonianthonianthoni
      The maker in question of the pruss. blue ( I use it in a gouache) is Daler-rowney . The other colour I use, viz; yell. ocher still needs some gall. I think the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 17, 2012
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        The maker in question of the pruss. blue ( I use it in a gouache) is Daler-rowney . The other colour I use, viz; yell. ocher still needs some gall. I think the spreadiness is an inherent property with this blue, as I have used other brands, and the colour still spread a lot.
        ****
        To return to the subject of making nonpareils per se, I have chanced across another set of directions for making an nonpareil, which siginficantly differ from the more commonly used one.

        I lay down the middle of the bath , a band of black.
        II on either side of the band, make bull's eye spots of colours ( by dropping one colour on top of another, like what one does to test the paints)
        III cross-stylus the pattern, then comb

        see http://www.aboutbookbinding.com/Practical_Bookbinding/Marbling-Gilding-Headband-Edges-4.html, 3rd paragraph onwards

        Has anyone ever tried this method before? do the results differ in any way to more conventional methods?
      • anthonianthonianthoni
        NOTA BENE: the link seems to be broken. To acess the article in question, go to http://www.aboutbookbinding.com/Practical_Bookbinding/Main.html and go to the
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 17, 2012
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          NOTA BENE: the link seems to be broken. To acess the article in question, go to
          http://www.aboutbookbinding.com/Practical_Bookbinding/Main.html
          and go to the 4th part of "Marbling, Gilding the Edges and Headbanding " ,

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "anthonianthonianthoni" <anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:
          >
          > The maker in question of the pruss. blue ( I use it in a gouache) is Daler-rowney . The other colour I use, viz; yell. ocher still needs some gall. I think the spreadiness is an inherent property with this blue, as I have used other brands, and the colour still spread a lot.
          > ****
          > To return to the subject of making nonpareils per se, I have chanced across another set of directions for making an nonpareil, which siginficantly differ from the more commonly used one.
          >
          > I lay down the middle of the bath , a band of black.
          > II on either side of the band, make bull's eye spots of colours ( by dropping one colour on top of another, like what one does to test the paints)
          > III cross-stylus the pattern, then comb
          >
          > see http://www.aboutbookbinding.com/Practical_Bookbinding/Marbling-Gilding-Headband-Edges-4.html, 3rd paragraph onwards
          >
          > Has anyone ever tried this method before? do the results differ in any way to more conventional methods?
          >
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