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the old dutch

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  • anthonianthonianthoni
    Dear marblers: There is a sort of marbled paper called the old dutch From what I know of it, you make it by dropping on colours on the size using a
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 17, 2011
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      Dear marblers:
      There is a sort of marbled paper called the "old dutch"
      From what I know of it, you make it by dropping on colours on the size using a peg-frame. Does any one of you here posses such a device, and if so, can you show me a picture of it?

      Also, is there any sort of advice that you can give about making this pattern? is there more than one way of making it?

      Regards:
      Anthony
    • M. Horovitz
      When I visited Sydney Cockerell in the late 1970s, William Chapman was using a device that sounds like what you describe. It was a wooden frame, similar in
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 17, 2011
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        When I visited Sydney Cockerell in the late 1970s, William Chapman was using a device that sounds like what you describe. It was a wooden frame, similar in size to the marbling tray, in the form of a grid. From each intersection of the wooden grid descended a peg, maybe 3" long, if memory serves. The pegs were all of exactly equal length, arranged in even rows.

        The marbling ink was carried in long, parallel trays. Several trays were laid side by side, with alternating colors in them. The peg frame was dropped into the trays so that alternating rows of pegs would have their ends submerged in the alternating colors. The frame was then very carefully lifted and the ends of the pegs just touched, simultaneously, to the surface of the size. This gave a perfect grid of alternating colored spots on the size, which could then be manipulated. If I remember correctly, he then repeated the process but, as he lowered the frame the second time, he turned it 180 degrees so that the opposite colors were then deposited on top of the first grid of dots.

        If you look at Cockerell papers, they have an uncanny sameness about them. This is how that was accomplished.

        I hope this makes sense. Somewhere I have pictures of all this happening. If I can find them, I'll post them.

        Marc Horovitz
      • anthonianthonianthoni
        By any chance, do you remember what colours did Sydney use?
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 17, 2011
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          By any chance, do you remember what colours did Sydney use?

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "M. Horovitz" <bannerworks@...> wrote:
          >
          > When I visited Sydney Cockerell in the late 1970s, William Chapman was using a device that sounds like what you describe. It was a wooden frame, similar in size to the marbling tray, in the form of a grid. From each intersection of the wooden grid descended a peg, maybe 3" long, if memory serves. The pegs were all of exactly equal length, arranged in even rows.
          >
          > The marbling ink was carried in long, parallel trays. Several trays were laid side by side, with alternating colors in them. The peg frame was dropped into the trays so that alternating rows of pegs would have their ends submerged in the alternating colors. The frame was then very carefully lifted and the ends of the pegs just touched, simultaneously, to the surface of the size. This gave a perfect grid of alternating colored spots on the size, which could then be manipulated. If I remember correctly, he then repeated the process but, as he lowered the frame the second time, he turned it 180 degrees so that the opposite colors were then deposited on top of the first grid of dots.
          >
          > If you look at Cockerell papers, they have an uncanny sameness about them. This is how that was accomplished.
          >
          > I hope this makes sense. Somewhere I have pictures of all this happening. If I can find them, I'll post them.
          >
          > Marc Horovitz
          >
        • M. Horovitz
          When I was there, I believe he was marbling with just black and blue. I d have to check my old photos to be sure though. Marc
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 17, 2011
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            When I was there, I believe he was marbling with just black and blue. I'd have to check my old photos to be sure though.

            Marc
          • irisnevins
            Yes... that s it. You can build just a rake, and dip into pots of color and do this row by row. I love their papers, yet I often get samples sent to me with a
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 17, 2011
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              Yes... that's it. You can build just a rake, and dip into pots of color and do this row by row. I love their papers, yet I often get samples sent to me with a note, saying, "can you do something similar, but add a HUMAN touch?". Some just love the randomness. I love both really!
              Iris Nevins
              www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: M. Horovitz<mailto:bannerworks@...>
              To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2011 11:21 AM
              Subject: [Marbling] Re: the old dutch


              When I visited Sydney Cockerell in the late 1970s, William Chapman was using a device that sounds like what you describe. It was a wooden frame, similar in size to the marbling tray, in the form of a grid. From each intersection of the wooden grid descended a peg, maybe 3" long, if memory serves. The pegs were all of exactly equal length, arranged in even rows.

              The marbling ink was carried in long, parallel trays. Several trays were laid side by side, with alternating colors in them. The peg frame was dropped into the trays so that alternating rows of pegs would have their ends submerged in the alternating colors. The frame was then very carefully lifted and the ends of the pegs just touched, simultaneously, to the surface of the size. This gave a perfect grid of alternating colored spots on the size, which could then be manipulated. If I remember correctly, he then repeated the process but, as he lowered the frame the second time, he turned it 180 degrees so that the opposite colors were then deposited on top of the first grid of dots.

              If you look at Cockerell papers, they have an uncanny sameness about them. This is how that was accomplished.

              I hope this makes sense. Somewhere I have pictures of all this happening. If I can find them, I'll post them.

              Marc Horovitz

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