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Re: [Marbling] Preparing gall

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  • irisnevins
    My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 16, 2011
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      My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and asked for the bile. Knowing I'd get the hairy-eyeball, I came armed with some nice marbling so explain why I wanted it. For artwork, not some weird ritual. So I had a milk container to be filled, a half gallon, and they didn't charge me or anything, but they had spilled over onto the sides, which were wet....and handed it to me. In the car it goes...and it was not my car, which was in the shop at the time. Well, not too bad. Until I stopped short and the bottle fell over and I found the cap was not on tightly. Upholstery cleaner and air freshener and windows open forever. What's that weird smell... says I..."What smell, I don't smell anything".

      OK, so this bottle of brown liquid, with white fatty particles. Hmmm... better get it into a glass bottle with a good cap. OK... then what. Onto the shelf. Forget about it for a few days. The sediment starts dropping to the bottom....the white fatty stuff. Better strain it perhaps. I open the bottle and it's like a loud pop. I can only imagine if I left it there tightly capped any longer, it could have exploded and my walls in the pantry would have been splattered forever and attracting Heaven knows what. So Anthoni, lesson one. Leave it to breathe a little. Gasses build up and can explode.

      They say the older it is the better it gets. I had a lot of it. I'd have it forever maybe. So that was good. For some reason I got the idea that I should add some alcohol. I used rubbing alcohol from the grocery store. Nothing fancy, too much worry about purism in marbling I have often thought, makes life too difficult. We can talk about the mess of a studio I work in some other time. No one comes to clean it, so why should I clean it either. Anyway, I made up an amount of alcohol to put in, just guesswork. This was before the web, so there was nowhere to readily look anything up like today. I figured it should be one cup to the whole mess of about half a gallon. I vaguely recall (it was nearly 30 years ago!) that I got the notion because my bought ox-gall smelled of alcohol. I thought it might keep it from exploding. I also left it loosely capped just in case. And hoped for the best, that no one or something wouldn't spill it. I live in a rural area and mice do run around now and then. So it seemed to help it more than hurt it, so Anthoni... I would do it again is all I can say. Add the alcohol that is, and the amount seemed OK.

      Straining it .... OK, be careful. You do need to strain out the sediment or lots of white spots (besides the dust!) will appear in the paints. I put a nylon stocking over a strainer and poured. And yes I spilled. One of my dogs, we used to breed Shelties, ran right to the spot and rubbed her head in it, dabbing behind the ears, then she trotted out in front of the male dogs, who got very interested. I'm not sure if that was one of the times an accidental litter of pups came a few months later, but it was funny. I don't recommend a stocking. Try a paper coffee filter. Sediment keeps showing up seemingly out of nowhere, forever, so you just have to keep straining now and then.

      So how did it work. It was just OK. I needed tons more than I would when using the processed concentrated gall we get. I don't know how they make that, and even that still gets sediment. The home brew got way more sediment, and was weaker, but yes indeed, it did what it was supposed to, every time.

      Let's just say, I would do it again if I had to. I prefer the cleaned up concentrate personally. You use so little of it, even if a little bottle seems pricey, a 2 oz. bottle will often last maybe 800 sheets of paper I am guessing. It goes such a long way. I don't like dealing with the fresh bile, it's a little too rough for me. It was fun to process and use it though for the experience, I felt like a "Real Marbler", but it was just a little TOO real! So I continue to buy it! One of the little luxuries in life is to have someone else do the dirty work as far as the gall is concerned.

      Sorry to make a short story long, Anthoni, but thought you may be amused by the details!

      Iris Nevins
      www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni@...>
      To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:38 PM
      Subject: [Marbling] Preparing gall


      Dear marblers:
      I have 2 questions regarding gall:
      1 how does one prepare the bile, that is fresh from the animal to make it suitable for marbling?
      2 has anyone tried the gall of a chicken ? Does it work?



      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • anthonianthonianthoni
      Dear Iris: thanks for this very informative, and amusing story! Regards: anthony
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 17, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Iris:
        thanks for this very informative, and amusing story!
        Regards:
        anthony
        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@...> wrote:
        >
        > My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and asked for the bile. Knowing I'd get the hairy-eyeball, I came armed with some nice marbling so explain why I wanted it. For artwork, not some weird ritual. So I had a milk container to be filled, a half gallon, and they didn't charge me or anything, but they had spilled over onto the sides, which were wet....and handed it to me. In the car it goes...and it was not my car, which was in the shop at the time. Well, not too bad. Until I stopped short and the bottle fell over and I found the cap was not on tightly. Upholstery cleaner and air freshener and windows open forever. What's that weird smell... says I..."What smell, I don't smell anything".
        >
        > OK, so this bottle of brown liquid, with white fatty particles. Hmmm... better get it into a glass bottle with a good cap. OK... then what. Onto the shelf. Forget about it for a few days. The sediment starts dropping to the bottom....the white fatty stuff. Better strain it perhaps. I open the bottle and it's like a loud pop. I can only imagine if I left it there tightly capped any longer, it could have exploded and my walls in the pantry would have been splattered forever and attracting Heaven knows what. So Anthoni, lesson one. Leave it to breathe a little. Gasses build up and can explode.
        >
        > They say the older it is the better it gets. I had a lot of it. I'd have it forever maybe. So that was good. For some reason I got the idea that I should add some alcohol. I used rubbing alcohol from the grocery store. Nothing fancy, too much worry about purism in marbling I have often thought, makes life too difficult. We can talk about the mess of a studio I work in some other time. No one comes to clean it, so why should I clean it either. Anyway, I made up an amount of alcohol to put in, just guesswork. This was before the web, so there was nowhere to readily look anything up like today. I figured it should be one cup to the whole mess of about half a gallon. I vaguely recall (it was nearly 30 years ago!) that I got the notion because my bought ox-gall smelled of alcohol. I thought it might keep it from exploding. I also left it loosely capped just in case. And hoped for the best, that no one or something wouldn't spill it. I live in a rural area and mice do run around now and then. So it seemed to help it more than hurt it, so Anthoni... I would do it again is all I can say. Add the alcohol that is, and the amount seemed OK.
        >
        > Straining it .... OK, be careful. You do need to strain out the sediment or lots of white spots (besides the dust!) will appear in the paints. I put a nylon stocking over a strainer and poured. And yes I spilled. One of my dogs, we used to breed Shelties, ran right to the spot and rubbed her head in it, dabbing behind the ears, then she trotted out in front of the male dogs, who got very interested. I'm not sure if that was one of the times an accidental litter of pups came a few months later, but it was funny. I don't recommend a stocking. Try a paper coffee filter. Sediment keeps showing up seemingly out of nowhere, forever, so you just have to keep straining now and then.
        >
        > So how did it work. It was just OK. I needed tons more than I would when using the processed concentrated gall we get. I don't know how they make that, and even that still gets sediment. The home brew got way more sediment, and was weaker, but yes indeed, it did what it was supposed to, every time.
        >
        > Let's just say, I would do it again if I had to. I prefer the cleaned up concentrate personally. You use so little of it, even if a little bottle seems pricey, a 2 oz. bottle will often last maybe 800 sheets of paper I am guessing. It goes such a long way. I don't like dealing with the fresh bile, it's a little too rough for me. It was fun to process and use it though for the experience, I felt like a "Real Marbler", but it was just a little TOO real! So I continue to buy it! One of the little luxuries in life is to have someone else do the dirty work as far as the gall is concerned.
        >
        > Sorry to make a short story long, Anthoni, but thought you may be amused by the details!
        >
        > Iris Nevins
        > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni@...>
        > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:38 PM
        > Subject: [Marbling] Preparing gall
        >
        >
        > Dear marblers:
        > I have 2 questions regarding gall:
        > 1 how does one prepare the bile, that is fresh from the animal to make it suitable for marbling?
        > 2 has anyone tried the gall of a chicken ? Does it work?
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • anthonianthonianthoni
        UPDATE: Dear marblers: I have just got my gall today. it came in the form of 5 bladders, from chickens. the fluid is a very dark green in colour. I added about
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 17, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          UPDATE:
          Dear marblers:
          I have just got my gall today. it came in the form of 5 bladders, from chickens.
          the fluid is a very dark green in colour. I added about twice its volume in methylated spirits. I shall wait a few days and then proceed.

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "anthonianthonianthoni" <anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Iris:
          > thanks for this very informative, and amusing story!
          > Regards:
          > anthony
          > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@> wrote:
          > >
          > > My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and asked for the bile. Knowing I'd get the hairy-eyeball, I came armed with some nice marbling so explain why I wanted it. For artwork, not some weird ritual. So I had a milk container to be filled, a half gallon, and they didn't charge me or anything, but they had spilled over onto the sides, which were wet....and handed it to me. In the car it goes...and it was not my car, which was in the shop at the time. Well, not too bad. Until I stopped short and the bottle fell over and I found the cap was not on tightly. Upholstery cleaner and air freshener and windows open forever. What's that weird smell... says I..."What smell, I don't smell anything".
          > >
          > > OK, so this bottle of brown liquid, with white fatty particles. Hmmm... better get it into a glass bottle with a good cap. OK... then what. Onto the shelf. Forget about it for a few days. The sediment starts dropping to the bottom....the white fatty stuff. Better strain it perhaps. I open the bottle and it's like a loud pop. I can only imagine if I left it there tightly capped any longer, it could have exploded and my walls in the pantry would have been splattered forever and attracting Heaven knows what. So Anthoni, lesson one. Leave it to breathe a little. Gasses build up and can explode.
          > >
          > > They say the older it is the better it gets. I had a lot of it. I'd have it forever maybe. So that was good. For some reason I got the idea that I should add some alcohol. I used rubbing alcohol from the grocery store. Nothing fancy, too much worry about purism in marbling I have often thought, makes life too difficult. We can talk about the mess of a studio I work in some other time. No one comes to clean it, so why should I clean it either. Anyway, I made up an amount of alcohol to put in, just guesswork. This was before the web, so there was nowhere to readily look anything up like today. I figured it should be one cup to the whole mess of about half a gallon. I vaguely recall (it was nearly 30 years ago!) that I got the notion because my bought ox-gall smelled of alcohol. I thought it might keep it from exploding. I also left it loosely capped just in case. And hoped for the best, that no one or something wouldn't spill it. I live in a rural area and mice do run around now and then. So it seemed to help it more than hurt it, so Anthoni... I would do it again is all I can say. Add the alcohol that is, and the amount seemed OK.
          > >
          > > Straining it .... OK, be careful. You do need to strain out the sediment or lots of white spots (besides the dust!) will appear in the paints. I put a nylon stocking over a strainer and poured. And yes I spilled. One of my dogs, we used to breed Shelties, ran right to the spot and rubbed her head in it, dabbing behind the ears, then she trotted out in front of the male dogs, who got very interested. I'm not sure if that was one of the times an accidental litter of pups came a few months later, but it was funny. I don't recommend a stocking. Try a paper coffee filter. Sediment keeps showing up seemingly out of nowhere, forever, so you just have to keep straining now and then.
          > >
          > > So how did it work. It was just OK. I needed tons more than I would when using the processed concentrated gall we get. I don't know how they make that, and even that still gets sediment. The home brew got way more sediment, and was weaker, but yes indeed, it did what it was supposed to, every time.
          > >
          > > Let's just say, I would do it again if I had to. I prefer the cleaned up concentrate personally. You use so little of it, even if a little bottle seems pricey, a 2 oz. bottle will often last maybe 800 sheets of paper I am guessing. It goes such a long way. I don't like dealing with the fresh bile, it's a little too rough for me. It was fun to process and use it though for the experience, I felt like a "Real Marbler", but it was just a little TOO real! So I continue to buy it! One of the little luxuries in life is to have someone else do the dirty work as far as the gall is concerned.
          > >
          > > Sorry to make a short story long, Anthoni, but thought you may be amused by the details!
          > >
          > > Iris Nevins
          > > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni@>
          > > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
          > > Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:38 PM
          > > Subject: [Marbling] Preparing gall
          > >
          > >
          > > Dear marblers:
          > > I have 2 questions regarding gall:
          > > 1 how does one prepare the bile, that is fresh from the animal to make it suitable for marbling?
          > > 2 has anyone tried the gall of a chicken ? Does it work?
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
        • irisnevins
          Hey...they used salmon gall, fish gall....so why not chicken. Keep us posted! Iris Nevins www.marblingpaper.com ... From:
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 17, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Hey...they used salmon gall, fish gall....so why not chicken. Keep us posted!
            Iris Nevins
            www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni@...>
            To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2011 11:39 PM
            Subject: [Marbling] Re: Preparing gall


            UPDATE:
            Dear marblers:
            I have just got my gall today. it came in the form of 5 bladders, from chickens.
            the fluid is a very dark green in colour. I added about twice its volume in methylated spirits. I shall wait a few days and then proceed.

            --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>, "anthonianthonianthoni" <anthonianthonianthoni@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear Iris:
            > thanks for this very informative, and amusing story!
            > Regards:
            > anthony
            > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@> wrote:
            > >
            > > My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and asked for the bile. Knowing I'd get the hairy-eyeball, I came armed with some nice marbling so explain why I wanted it. For artwork, not some weird ritual. So I had a milk container to be filled, a half gallon, and they didn't charge me or anything, but they had spilled over onto the sides, which were wet....and handed it to me. In the car it goes...and it was not my car, which was in the shop at the time. Well, not too bad. Until I stopped short and the bottle fell over and I found the cap was not on tightly. Upholstery cleaner and air freshener and windows open forever. What's that weird smell... says I..."What smell, I don't smell anything".
            > >
            > > OK, so this bottle of brown liquid, with white fatty particles. Hmmm... better get it into a glass bottle with a good cap. OK... then what. Onto the shelf. Forget about it for a few days. The sediment starts dropping to the bottom....the white fatty stuff. Better strain it perhaps. I open the bottle and it's like a loud pop. I can only imagine if I left it there tightly capped any longer, it could have exploded and my walls in the pantry would have been splattered forever and attracting Heaven knows what. So Anthoni, lesson one. Leave it to breathe a little. Gasses build up and can explode.
            > >
            > > They say the older it is the better it gets. I had a lot of it. I'd have it forever maybe. So that was good. For some reason I got the idea that I should add some alcohol. I used rubbing alcohol from the grocery store. Nothing fancy, too much worry about purism in marbling I have often thought, makes life too difficult. We can talk about the mess of a studio I work in some other time. No one comes to clean it, so why should I clean it either. Anyway, I made up an amount of alcohol to put in, just guesswork. This was before the web, so there was nowhere to readily look anything up like today. I figured it should be one cup to the whole mess of about half a gallon. I vaguely recall (it was nearly 30 years ago!) that I got the notion because my bought ox-gall smelled of alcohol. I thought it might keep it from exploding. I also left it loosely capped just in case. And hoped for the best, that no one or something wouldn't spill it. I live in a rural area and mice do run around now
            and then. So it seemed to help it more than hurt it, so Anthoni... I would do it again is all I can say. Add the alcohol that is, and the amount seemed OK.
            > >
            > > Straining it .... OK, be careful. You do need to strain out the sediment or lots of white spots (besides the dust!) will appear in the paints. I put a nylon stocking over a strainer and poured. And yes I spilled. One of my dogs, we used to breed Shelties, ran right to the spot and rubbed her head in it, dabbing behind the ears, then she trotted out in front of the male dogs, who got very interested. I'm not sure if that was one of the times an accidental litter of pups came a few months later, but it was funny. I don't recommend a stocking. Try a paper coffee filter. Sediment keeps showing up seemingly out of nowhere, forever, so you just have to keep straining now and then.
            > >
            > > So how did it work. It was just OK. I needed tons more than I would when using the processed concentrated gall we get. I don't know how they make that, and even that still gets sediment. The home brew got way more sediment, and was weaker, but yes indeed, it did what it was supposed to, every time.
            > >
            > > Let's just say, I would do it again if I had to. I prefer the cleaned up concentrate personally. You use so little of it, even if a little bottle seems pricey, a 2 oz. bottle will often last maybe 800 sheets of paper I am guessing. It goes such a long way. I don't like dealing with the fresh bile, it's a little too rough for me. It was fun to process and use it though for the experience, I felt like a "Real Marbler", but it was just a little TOO real! So I continue to buy it! One of the little luxuries in life is to have someone else do the dirty work as far as the gall is concerned.
            > >
            > > Sorry to make a short story long, Anthoni, but thought you may be amused by the details!
            > >
            > > Iris Nevins
            > > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/<http://www.marblingpaper.com%3chttp//www.marblingpaper.com/>>
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni>@>
            > > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>>
            > > Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:38 PM
            > > Subject: [Marbling] Preparing gall
            > >
            > >
            > > Dear marblers:
            > > I have 2 questions regarding gall:
            > > 1 how does one prepare the bile, that is fresh from the animal to make it suitable for marbling?
            > > 2 has anyone tried the gall of a chicken ? Does it work?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >




            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • anthonianthonianthoni
            UPDATE: since I have added the spirits, the gall has seperaated into 2 layers: one that is a mass of greenish white particles, and occupies the nottom three
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 17, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              UPDATE:
              since I have added the spirits, the gall has seperaated into 2 layers: one that is a mass of greenish white particles, and occupies the nottom three quartes of the container. the other quarter is a greenish liquid, like the raw product

              --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hey...they used salmon gall, fish gall....so why not chicken. Keep us posted!
              > Iris Nevins
              > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni@...>
              > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2011 11:39 PM
              > Subject: [Marbling] Re: Preparing gall
              >
              >
              > UPDATE:
              > Dear marblers:
              > I have just got my gall today. it came in the form of 5 bladders, from chickens.
              > the fluid is a very dark green in colour. I added about twice its volume in methylated spirits. I shall wait a few days and then proceed.
              >
              > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>, "anthonianthonianthoni" <anthonianthonianthoni@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Dear Iris:
              > > thanks for this very informative, and amusing story!
              > > Regards:
              > > anthony
              > > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and asked for the bile. Knowing I'd get the hairy-eyeball, I came armed with some nice marbling so explain why I wanted it. For artwork, not some weird ritual. So I had a milk container to be filled, a half gallon, and they didn't charge me or anything, but they had spilled over onto the sides, which were wet....and handed it to me. In the car it goes...and it was not my car, which was in the shop at the time. Well, not too bad. Until I stopped short and the bottle fell over and I found the cap was not on tightly. Upholstery cleaner and air freshener and windows open forever. What's that weird smell... says I..."What smell, I don't smell anything".
              > > >
              > > > OK, so this bottle of brown liquid, with white fatty particles. Hmmm... better get it into a glass bottle with a good cap. OK... then what. Onto the shelf. Forget about it for a few days. The sediment starts dropping to the bottom....the white fatty stuff. Better strain it perhaps. I open the bottle and it's like a loud pop. I can only imagine if I left it there tightly capped any longer, it could have exploded and my walls in the pantry would have been splattered forever and attracting Heaven knows what. So Anthoni, lesson one. Leave it to breathe a little. Gasses build up and can explode.
              > > >
              > > > They say the older it is the better it gets. I had a lot of it. I'd have it forever maybe. So that was good. For some reason I got the idea that I should add some alcohol. I used rubbing alcohol from the grocery store. Nothing fancy, too much worry about purism in marbling I have often thought, makes life too difficult. We can talk about the mess of a studio I work in some other time. No one comes to clean it, so why should I clean it either. Anyway, I made up an amount of alcohol to put in, just guesswork. This was before the web, so there was nowhere to readily look anything up like today. I figured it should be one cup to the whole mess of about half a gallon. I vaguely recall (it was nearly 30 years ago!) that I got the notion because my bought ox-gall smelled of alcohol. I thought it might keep it from exploding. I also left it loosely capped just in case. And hoped for the best, that no one or something wouldn't spill it. I live in a rural area and mice do run around now
              > and then. So it seemed to help it more than hurt it, so Anthoni... I would do it again is all I can say. Add the alcohol that is, and the amount seemed OK.
              > > >
              > > > Straining it .... OK, be careful. You do need to strain out the sediment or lots of white spots (besides the dust!) will appear in the paints. I put a nylon stocking over a strainer and poured. And yes I spilled. One of my dogs, we used to breed Shelties, ran right to the spot and rubbed her head in it, dabbing behind the ears, then she trotted out in front of the male dogs, who got very interested. I'm not sure if that was one of the times an accidental litter of pups came a few months later, but it was funny. I don't recommend a stocking. Try a paper coffee filter. Sediment keeps showing up seemingly out of nowhere, forever, so you just have to keep straining now and then.
              > > >
              > > > So how did it work. It was just OK. I needed tons more than I would when using the processed concentrated gall we get. I don't know how they make that, and even that still gets sediment. The home brew got way more sediment, and was weaker, but yes indeed, it did what it was supposed to, every time.
              > > >
              > > > Let's just say, I would do it again if I had to. I prefer the cleaned up concentrate personally. You use so little of it, even if a little bottle seems pricey, a 2 oz. bottle will often last maybe 800 sheets of paper I am guessing. It goes such a long way. I don't like dealing with the fresh bile, it's a little too rough for me. It was fun to process and use it though for the experience, I felt like a "Real Marbler", but it was just a little TOO real! So I continue to buy it! One of the little luxuries in life is to have someone else do the dirty work as far as the gall is concerned.
              > > >
              > > > Sorry to make a short story long, Anthoni, but thought you may be amused by the details!
              > > >
              > > > Iris Nevins
              > > > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/<http://www.marblingpaper.com%3chttp//www.marblingpaper.com/>>
              > > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni>@>
              > > > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>>
              > > > Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:38 PM
              > > > Subject: [Marbling] Preparing gall
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Dear marblers:
              > > > I have 2 questions regarding gall:
              > > > 1 how does one prepare the bile, that is fresh from the animal to make it suitable for marbling?
              > > > 2 has anyone tried the gall of a chicken ? Does it work?
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------------
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              > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
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              > > >
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              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > >
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              >
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            • irisnevins
              You will have to do a lot of strainings. Those are the fatty particles. The cow or steer bile I got didn t do so much separating like that. Maybe it s good
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 18, 2011
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                You will have to do a lot of strainings. Those are the fatty particles. The cow or steer bile I got didn't do so much separating like that. Maybe it's good and doing it all in one shot. I'd strain it now, and see what else happens.
                Iris Nevins
                www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni@...>
                To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, November 18, 2011 1:46 AM
                Subject: [Marbling] Re: Preparing gall


                UPDATE:
                since I have added the spirits, the gall has seperaated into 2 layers: one that is a mass of greenish white particles, and occupies the nottom three quartes of the container. the other quarter is a greenish liquid, like the raw product

                --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hey...they used salmon gall, fish gall....so why not chicken. Keep us posted!
                > Iris Nevins
                > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/<http://www.marblingpaper.com%3chttp//www.marblingpaper.com/>>
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni>@...>
                > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>>
                > Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2011 11:39 PM
                > Subject: [Marbling] Re: Preparing gall
                >
                >
                > UPDATE:
                > Dear marblers:
                > I have just got my gall today. it came in the form of 5 bladders, from chickens.
                > the fluid is a very dark green in colour. I added about twice its volume in methylated spirits. I shall wait a few days and then proceed.
                >
                > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>>, "anthonianthonianthoni" <anthonianthonianthoni@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Dear Iris:
                > > thanks for this very informative, and amusing story!
                > > Regards:
                > > anthony
                > > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>>, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > My adventure (note, ONE adventure!) with processing my own gall, minus any instruction, was interesting. First of all I went to the butcher down the road and asked for the bile. Knowing I'd get the hairy-eyeball, I came armed with some nice marbling so explain why I wanted it. For artwork, not some weird ritual. So I had a milk container to be filled, a half gallon, and they didn't charge me or anything, but they had spilled over onto the sides, which were wet....and handed it to me. In the car it goes...and it was not my car, which was in the shop at the time. Well, not too bad. Until I stopped short and the bottle fell over and I found the cap was not on tightly. Upholstery cleaner and air freshener and windows open forever. What's that weird smell... says I..."What smell, I don't smell anything".
                > > >
                > > > OK, so this bottle of brown liquid, with white fatty particles. Hmmm... better get it into a glass bottle with a good cap. OK... then what. Onto the shelf. Forget about it for a few days. The sediment starts dropping to the bottom....the white fatty stuff. Better strain it perhaps. I open the bottle and it's like a loud pop. I can only imagine if I left it there tightly capped any longer, it could have exploded and my walls in the pantry would have been splattered forever and attracting Heaven knows what. So Anthoni, lesson one. Leave it to breathe a little. Gasses build up and can explode.
                > > >
                > > > They say the older it is the better it gets. I had a lot of it. I'd have it forever maybe. So that was good. For some reason I got the idea that I should add some alcohol. I used rubbing alcohol from the grocery store. Nothing fancy, too much worry about purism in marbling I have often thought, makes life too difficult. We can talk about the mess of a studio I work in some other time. No one comes to clean it, so why should I clean it either. Anyway, I made up an amount of alcohol to put in, just guesswork. This was before the web, so there was nowhere to readily look anything up like today. I figured it should be one cup to the whole mess of about half a gallon. I vaguely recall (it was nearly 30 years ago!) that I got the notion because my bought ox-gall smelled of alcohol. I thought it might keep it from exploding. I also left it loosely capped just in case. And hoped for the best, that no one or something wouldn't spill it. I live in a rural area and mice do run around
                now
                > and then. So it seemed to help it more than hurt it, so Anthoni... I would do it again is all I can say. Add the alcohol that is, and the amount seemed OK.
                > > >
                > > > Straining it .... OK, be careful. You do need to strain out the sediment or lots of white spots (besides the dust!) will appear in the paints. I put a nylon stocking over a strainer and poured. And yes I spilled. One of my dogs, we used to breed Shelties, ran right to the spot and rubbed her head in it, dabbing behind the ears, then she trotted out in front of the male dogs, who got very interested. I'm not sure if that was one of the times an accidental litter of pups came a few months later, but it was funny. I don't recommend a stocking. Try a paper coffee filter. Sediment keeps showing up seemingly out of nowhere, forever, so you just have to keep straining now and then.
                > > >
                > > > So how did it work. It was just OK. I needed tons more than I would when using the processed concentrated gall we get. I don't know how they make that, and even that still gets sediment. The home brew got way more sediment, and was weaker, but yes indeed, it did what it was supposed to, every time.
                > > >
                > > > Let's just say, I would do it again if I had to. I prefer the cleaned up concentrate personally. You use so little of it, even if a little bottle seems pricey, a 2 oz. bottle will often last maybe 800 sheets of paper I am guessing. It goes such a long way. I don't like dealing with the fresh bile, it's a little too rough for me. It was fun to process and use it though for the experience, I felt like a "Real Marbler", but it was just a little TOO real! So I continue to buy it! One of the little luxuries in life is to have someone else do the dirty work as far as the gall is concerned.
                > > >
                > > > Sorry to make a short story long, Anthoni, but thought you may be amused by the details!
                > > >
                > > > Iris Nevins
                > > > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/<http://www.marblingpaper.com%3chttp//www.marblingpaper.com/<http://www.marblingpaper.com%3chttp//www.marblingpaper.com/%3Chttp://www.marblingpaper.com%3chttp//www.marblingpaper.com/>>>
                > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > From: anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni<mailto:anthonianthonianthoni%3Cmailto:anthonianthonianthoni>>@>
                > > > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com%3Cmailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>>>
                > > > Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 10:38 PM
                > > > Subject: [Marbling] Preparing gall
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Dear marblers:
                > > > I have 2 questions regarding gall:
                > > > 1 how does one prepare the bile, that is fresh from the animal to make it suitable for marbling?
                > > > 2 has anyone tried the gall of a chicken ? Does it work?
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > ------------------------------------
                > > >
                > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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                > Yahoo! Groups Links
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                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >




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