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RE: Dye-Na-Flow

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  • Kindy Kemp
    Hi, I ve tried Dye-Na-Flow on silk and cotton a couple of times and I had mixed feelings about the results. It s basically a thinned paint and I found that it
    Message 1 of 2 , May 29, 2001
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      Hi,
      I've tried Dye-Na-Flow on silk and cotton a couple of times and I
      had mixed feelings about the results. It's basically a thinned paint and I
      found that it sank in the size a lot (but I'm pretty inexperienced at
      marbling and part of it could've been my technique for putting the color on
      and part of it the coolish room temperature). We had a very murky bath at
      the end of about five hours of marbling.
      I liked the effect that I got on cotton--it was not flat and
      completely evenly coated, but in some places had a little texture (something
      like slightly separated paint), and after I had heatset the color, the hand
      of the fabric was soft (I prefer dye to paint, so I'm always looking for
      something that will not stiffen the fabric). The intensity of the colors
      varied a little, but I think that might have been partly a function of the
      alum--I didn't leave all my pieces in the alum water for the same amount of
      time. The silk looked more dyed (rather than painted) than the cotton and
      had a soft hand. Some people might think that the brightness was not
      sufficient because of the occasional mottling.
      I've never heard that you could use Dye-Na-Flow without alum. The
      friend I marbled with used a coarse weave of cotton (something like
      Osnaberg) and lost a lot of the color, possibly because of not soaking it in
      alum long enough to penetrate. (That fabric took a lot of size with it each
      time she lifted it out of the bath.)
      I've also tried Liquitex medium viscosity acrylics on fabric, with
      varied results--it sank a lot and I was frustrated with some of the colors I
      got when I mixed them. Again I got a murky bath very quickly. The third
      thing I tried was something called a pigment dye, sold by Dharma Trading Co.
      (www.dharmatrading.com), which gave okay results but also murked up the size
      rapidly and had more of a painty hand than I wanted.
      Now I'm trying the colors that Galen Berry sells--but I haven't used
      them with fabric yet. However, no sinkage problems.
      I do think Dye-Na-Flow is worth trying and you can get it through
      Dharma as well as Rupert, Gibbon & Spider.

      Kindy Kemp
      El Sobrante, California
    • irisnevins
      Best to stick to paints made by marblers for the marbling process for those reasons, or at least ones that have been heavily tested by marblers. So many of the
      Message 2 of 2 , May 29, 2001
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        Best to stick to paints made by marblers for the marbling process for those
        reasons, or at least ones that have been heavily tested by marblers. So
        many of the pigments are not compatible with the marbling process or even
        if they are, may not be friendly to other pigments that also are. Sometimes
        certain chemical and physical properties make them sink more quickly,
        spread too much, etc. Unfortunately it isn't always a matter of picking a
        pretty color in marbling. A lot of great colors just plain old do not work!


        I find that a quick dunking in weak alum water (1tbs. per 2-3 cups hot
        water) is sufficient for fabrics, if it is aluminum sulphate or aluminum
        potassium sulphate....the best kind for marbling. I find that I always need
        alum with fabrics, but can use my acrylics on paper (almost all papers)
        without alum. Not sure if this is true of other acrylics. The color is just
        as intense as if alum was used.

        I.Nevins
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