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Re: [Marbling] some tips

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  • Lavinia Adler
    Thanks for that very informative email, Sue. I keep thinking that some day I ll get back to marbling and this really got me enthusiastic. Now all I have to do
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 23, 2010
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      Thanks for that very informative email, Sue. I keep thinking that some
      day I'll get back to marbling and this really got me enthusiastic. Now
      all I have to do it find time. ; -)

      Lavinia

      On Thu, 22 Jul 2010 19:07:02 -0800 Sue Cole <akartisan@...> writes:
      I like to experiment, so don't always do things the "orthodox" way, so
      you
      can disregard this of course....................

      .............Anyone else have some ideas they would like to pass along,
      or is this too
      large a subject?
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    • dguff
      Hi all, One of my favorite marbling tool is a plastic pipette. I can control exactly how much color to drop to the surface (I have better control with the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 23, 2010
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        Hi all,

        One of my favorite marbling tool is a plastic pipette. I can control exactly how much color to drop to the surface (I have better control with the pipette than a plastic bottle). I just rinse them out after using, and they last forever. Perfect for making bulls-eyes, with one color on top of another. Warning...some colors are "chasers" so you need to experiment which colors to put on first. I marble with acrylics.

        d.guffey


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Sue Cole
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 8:07 PM
        Subject: [Marbling] some tips



        I like to experiment, so don't always do things the "orthodox" way, so you
        can disregard this of course.

        I'm taking a break. I make my scarves outside in the summer in a tent in my
        yard. I was having trouble with both my purple and red. If I can get a
        purple and red scarf, the red hat society will grab them up. I had thinned
        them down and tried acrylic flow release and they still weren't working, so
        I put in some stuff called "Paint Easy" that I got from Wal-Mart and they
        both worked great after that. You don't need very much, so a bottle will
        last a long time. It comes in a quart bottle and is the paint section in
        the hardware part. I had noticed it and had used it last winter, then had
        forgotten about it until now. It says it is a "latex paint conditioner.
        thins paint without diluting it", so I figure it's like a medium. Galen
        Berry had told someone else who was having trouble to put in some matte
        medium in their paint.

        I use the plastic broomstraws tied in a bundle that I got from Galen Berry
        for applying the paint and I also make my own brushes Caryl Hance? was kind
        enough to send me an example one time. You take a cheap whisk broom and cut
        off the bristles and tie them up with a rubber band, then glue that to a
        popsicle stick with Liquid Nails or Gorilla glue. Costs almost nothing and
        you can always make more when they wear out. I'm cheap, so always take care
        of my brushes and haven't had to replace any yet.

        When I'm doing a lot of scarves, I mix up my paint in 16 oz clear or white
        plastic cups, then put them in a large muffin tin and put lids on each cup
        overnight. When I mix up too much paint, I put it in plastic bottles with
        tips that I get from the cake decorating section of MIchaels Crafts. They
        are in a tub of 18 bottles for $16 and are clear with tips for each one.
        Sometimes I use the bottles to apply the paint, sometimes the cups and
        brushes.

        For paper marbling, Michaels has a "photo frame" that is clear plastic with
        sides and is just perfect for a marbling tub. For larger ones, I make my
        own from wood and free paneling that I salvage, then line it with a double
        layer of plastic. You can also make the frame of pvc pipe and line it with
        plastic. I have a scarf display that is all pvc pipe and comes apart when
        I'm not using it.

        I have a tremor, so am not as successful with combed designs, so I do what I
        call "free flow" instead, where I throw the paint, then manipulate it with a
        styles, like a knitting needle or a bamboo skewer.

        I found out accidentally that gel alcohol hand sanitizer will remove acrylic
        paint from your hands, the counter, the floor, etc.

        I use the folding wooden clothes dryer that you use for diapers for drying
        scarves and I also have one of pvc pipe and foam rollers that comes all
        apart for storage.

        Another accidental tip I read about is that fabric softener will remove
        acrylic paint from brushes, even if it's been on for awhile - you just soak
        it for awhile. When I'm taking a break for a few days, I put my brushes in
        a bucket with a small amount of fabric softeneer and water to cover the
        brushes and let them sit for a day, then rinse them out.

        Anyone else have some ideas they would like to pass along, or is this too
        large a subject?
        Sue

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      • Sue Cole
        Yes, I have some pipettes that I bought for this and forgot about. LOL! My friends call my the gadget queen because I like to experiment. The only person I
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 24, 2010
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          Yes, I have some pipettes that I bought for this and forgot about. LOL! My
          friends call my "the gadget queen" because I like to experiment.

          The only person I was able to take a lesson from used eye droppers to
          apply the paint, but because of my tremor (benign essential tremor -
          basically a nuisance) those don't work for me, so I went to the bottles and
          brushes. When I mix too much in a cup or want to quit for awhile, like a
          week or a month, I put the paint in the bottles.

          I have been amazed that I am able to do the Ebru style with the flowers with
          my tremor, but I sort of hold my breath and really concentrate. Also the
          "spanish wave:"techniques is actually easier for my because of my hands.

          I just washed out a whole slew of bottles because I am too cheap to throw
          them out, so I soaked them overnight in the fabric softener and water
          mixture, then used a toothbrush on the ribby parts and a test tube brush on
          the tips and they are all clean again.

          Another tip someone told me about, Ginny or Pat?, was to mix a cup of
          acrylic flow release and water and use it for "clear":, when you want to
          make the large hols for overmarbling effects.

          Another one that I have not mastered yet is to use a turkey baster to
          carefully suck up 3 colors, one after the other, then when you gently
          squeeze them out, you will get a tricolor effect. Maybe the pipettes might
          work this way?

          The only paints I have not had any luck with have been metallics. No matter
          how much I thin them down, they always sink. Any one else have any luck
          with this?
          Sue


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