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pigment paints

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  • Sue Cole
    are you talking about the pigments in powdered form? You would need to mix a binder with them, I would think before you can dilute them. For watercolors, for
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 22, 2010
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      are you talking about the pigments in powdered form? You would need to mix
      a binder with them, I would think before you can dilute them. For
      watercolors, for instance, you would mix them with gum arabic to make a
      paste first, then further dilute them from there. You would probably be
      adding the wax to make your own pastels (sticks)

      Daniel Smith is one source: http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-G-284-030
      I'm sure you could call and talk to one of their people for help. there's
      another place in San Francisco, but I can't think of their name just now.
      Some people, like Peggy Skycraft and Galen Berry, add extra pigment to their
      red acrylic to make it appear redder in the marbling process.

      Otherwise, this is some information I had saved for my watercolor students:

      * *

      **More than you will ever want to know about art supplies and other related
      subjects:

      *http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/wmap.html*

      *http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/waterfs.html pigment page*

      *http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/water.html watercolor page*

      Hope this is what you were asking about.
      Sue

      For the rest of you, here's a link I had saved:


      http://waterpaintings.net/

      Alexis America � marbling that looks like ocean waves.





      I save all my notes in Word documents so I don't have to remember what email
      it was in.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dguff
      The store in San Francisco is Sinopia and their website is: http://www.sinopia.com They can tell you everything you need to know about mixing your own paints
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 22, 2010
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        The store in San Francisco is Sinopia and their website is:
        http://www.sinopia.com

        They can tell you everything you need to know about mixing your own paints
        from dry pigments. They sell to master restorers who repair old and valuable
        oil paintings and have to mix the paint to match exactly. I'm sure they
        could help you with watercolor paints as well.

        Hope this helps,

        d.guffey

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Sue Cole" <akartisan@...>
        To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:43 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] pigment paints


        > are you talking about the pigments in powdered form? You would need to
        > mix
        > a binder with them, I would think before you can dilute them. For
        > watercolors, for instance, you would mix them with gum arabic to make a
        > paste first, then further dilute them from there. You would probably be
        > adding the wax to make your own pastels (sticks)
        >
        > Daniel Smith is one source: http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-G-284-030
        > I'm sure you could call and talk to one of their people for help. there's
        > another place in San Francisco, but I can't think of their name just now.
        > Some people, like Peggy Skycraft and Galen Berry, add extra pigment to
        > their
        > red acrylic to make it appear redder in the marbling process.
        >

        >


        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



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      • Joe
        Thanks to you and everyone else who has posted some help on here. Thank you all
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 23, 2010
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          Thanks to you and everyone else who has posted some help on here.
          Thank you all

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:
          >
          > are you talking about the pigments in powdered form? You would need to mix
          > a binder with them, I would think before you can dilute them. For
          > watercolors, for instance, you would mix them with gum arabic to make a
          > paste first, then further dilute them from there. You would probably be
          > adding the wax to make your own pastels (sticks)
          >
          > Daniel Smith is one source: http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-G-284-030
          > I'm sure you could call and talk to one of their people for help. there's
          > another place in San Francisco, but I can't think of their name just now.
          > Some people, like Peggy Skycraft and Galen Berry, add extra pigment to their
          > red acrylic to make it appear redder in the marbling process.
          >
          > Otherwise, this is some information I had saved for my watercolor students:
          >
          > * *
          >
          > **More than you will ever want to know about art supplies and other related
          > subjects:
          >
          > *http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/wmap.html*
          >
          > *http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/waterfs.html pigment page*
          >
          > *http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/water.html watercolor page*
          >
          > Hope this is what you were asking about.
          > Sue
          >
          > For the rest of you, here's a link I had saved:
          >
          >
          > http://waterpaintings.net/
          >
          > Alexis America � marbling that looks like ocean waves.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I save all my notes in Word documents so I don't have to remember what email
          > it was in.
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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