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Re:Marbling newbie

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  • Sue Cole
    where to start? Yes Peggy Skycrafts s dvd is a good one. There are only 2 that I know of. Hers and Mimi Schleicher - they cover similar but different
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 19, 2009
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      where to start? Yes Peggy Skycrafts's dvd is a good one. There
      are only 2 that I know of. Hers and Mimi Schleicher - they cover
      similar but different aspects and I would recommend both of them.
      Some people on here complained that the sound was poor of
      Peggy's dvd, but I didn't have any problems with mine. Here is the
      link for Mimi's: http://www.marbling.com/ also, she is very helpful if
      you call her after seeing the dvd. It is a copy of their video.

      Both dvds are very thorough and do a good job of explaining. I
      have no one here locally who marbles, so had to teach myself most
      of the things I do. I did have one one day class with someone two
      years ago who used watercolors on carageen on paper, then I tried
      sumigashi, then went into the rest of my experiments.

      When I got started I bought those and every book I could find.
      Dianne Maurer's books are especially good also.

      For skimming the tanks, most people either use a piece of
      newspaper or a thin stick of wood, about 1/4 by 2 - 3 inches wide,
      like a flat trim, then wipe that off. I learned that one from Galen
      Berry in Oklahoma.

      The bath or gel or size, whatever you want to call it, does not have
      to stay clean to use it, just the surface of it. There are lots of videos
      on youtube to watch. Just put marbling or ebru in the search box.
      My favorite is this one of two australian women who use oil colors to
      marble huge pieces of silk and cloth.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54OILOfT1bs it also has
      wonderful music by singing bowl. You will see several others to
      watch to the right of it. Some are bad - from craft shows, but most
      are good ones. Ebru is the turkish version, and as far as I know, it
      means "cloud painting" There are several fascinating ones to watch
      on that. There are also lots from italy.

      I tell people marbling is addicting, because each one is one of a
      kind and sometimes they look different wet than dry. I have been
      making marbled silk scarves, bandannas and cloth. I have a
      tremor, so am not as successful at the combed designs, so I do
      more what I call "free form" designs and people have really liked
      them.

      Also look up Moth Marblers or Iris Nevins or Galen Berry for other
      fine examples of marbling. Also this person does clothing:
      http://www.silksbylucia.com/ click on the link for the process of
      marbling and that shows how she and I do scarves.
      HTH
      Sue
      Fairbanks, AK

      I'm sure other people will respond as well. Also, as you said, look
      through the archives.
    • Bill Colvard
      Thank you all for the responses on and off list. I will respond to all of you individually later today. It s a tremendous amount of help. Right now, I am going
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 21, 2009
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        Thank you all for the responses on and off list. I will respond to all of you individually later today. It's a tremendous amount of help. Right now, I am going to the studio to try some things out. Oh, some of you wanted to know what I was using to better help. I must confess that since I wasn't sure I would like marbling, I invested the grand sum of $13.99 for the Jacquard Mini Marbling Kit from Dharma. It comes with methyl cel, alum and 6 1/2 oz. dropper bottles of Versatex Marbling colors. I'm guessing they're acrylic.

        Only the red and white floated and spread straight out of the bottle. The others didn't really sink. They just didn't spread. I thought ok. Dots are cool too. But no, when I started combing and moving the red and white, then they sank. After I had squirted lots of them. Hence the dirty trayful. And of course, I messed with them too much so that I couldn't tell what was on surface and what was on bottom. I did get one good print. Well, it wasn't good but good enough to keep me interested. And determined to do better. I am testing on 11" x 11" silk habotai hankies. I have lots of them left over from a childrens art festival where I taught silk painting to the kids. When looking for a suitable tray, it was surprisingly hard to find something over 12" wide. I ended up with a storage bin that's about 12 x 18". That's why I have so much left over ink. I'm marbling a square in a rectangle.

        So I learned that I should do a sheet of paper the size of the extra to take up some of that ink . Now it's better. Off to try some more.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sue Cole
        most people build their own trays to the size of what they are marbling. For the scarves and bandannas and cloth, I built individual tanks for each size. I
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 22, 2009
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          most people build their own trays to the size of what they are marbling. For the scarves and bandannas and cloth, I built individual tanks for each size. I used leftover paneling for the backs, and 1 x4's I think it is for the sides, then lined them with a double layer of heavy visqueen. For the paper, I found these photo box frames at Michaels which are perfect because they are all clear plastic withsides that are about 1" deep. Unfortunately, the largest size is 16 x 20, so for the larger sizes, I built a tank.

          There are more expensive tanks that you can buy made out of plastic or wood, sometimes you see them on ebay, but I couldn't afford them. I believe they are about $50 and they are for paper. Mimi uses one in her film and explains how to make one.

          You need to thin down the paint enough so that it will float and every pigment is a little different. It's about equal parts of water, but some need more, some need less. The colors I have the hadest time with on fabric are black and red - getting them to LOOK black or red, because they come out paler on the cloth, partly because the cloth absorbs some oof the paint, the same way watercolor paper absorbs some of the paint when you are painting on it, at least that's what I have observed.

          Maybe someone has a better explanation. I've been able to get some nice blacks on silk and cotton, but it seems to be the luck of the draw. Sometimes they come out black, other times they come out grey, same with the red. The reds tend to come out as orange or pink on the fabric. They look red on the PAPER, which I do at the end of the tank, so that's the frustrating part to me that I'm still trying to overcome.

          Sue


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • marines bengoa
          hi,   Regarding black, red and any other color: Has anybody tried to mix extra fine powdered pigments with the paint?    Does it dissolves? Does it add
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 22, 2009
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            hi,
             
            Regarding black, red and any other color: Has anybody tried to mix extra fine powdered pigments with the paint? 
             
            Does it dissolves? Does it add intensity to the color? What kind of pigment and brand is best for fabric marbling?  Please comment. 

            --- On Tue, 9/22/09, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:


            From: Sue Cole <akartisan@...>
            Subject: [Marbling] Re:Marbling newbie
            To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 10:49 AM


             



            most people build their own trays to the size of what they are marbling. For the scarves and bandannas and cloth, I built individual tanks for each size. I used leftover paneling for the backs, and 1 x4's I think it is for the sides, then lined them with a double layer of heavy visqueen. For the paper, I found these photo box frames at Michaels which are perfect because they are all clear plastic withsides that are about 1" deep. Unfortunately, the largest size is 16 x 20, so for the larger sizes, I built a tank.

            There are more expensive tanks that you can buy made out of plastic or wood, sometimes you see them on ebay, but I couldn't afford them. I believe they are about $50 and they are for paper. Mimi uses one in her film and explains how to make one.

            You need to thin down the paint enough so that it will float and every pigment is a little different. It's about equal parts of water, but some need more, some need less. The colors I have the hadest time with on fabric are black and red - getting them to LOOK black or red, because they come out paler on the cloth, partly because the cloth absorbs some oof the paint, the same way watercolor paper absorbs some of the paint when you are painting on it, at least that's what I have observed.

            Maybe someone has a better explanation. I've been able to get some nice blacks on silk and cotton, but it seems to be the luck of the draw. Sometimes they come out black, other times they come out grey, same with the red. The reds tend to come out as orange or pink on the fabric. They look red on the PAPER, which I do at the end of the tank, so that's the frustrating part to me that I'm still trying to overcome.

            Sue

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • zozo7bra
            The Peggy Skycraft video is excellent. One of my bibles is A book by Dianne Maurer: The Ultimate Marbling Handbook; This one is hard to find. You can find at
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 22, 2009
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              The Peggy Skycraft video is excellent.
              One of my bibles is A book by Dianne Maurer: The Ultimate Marbling Handbook; This one is hard to find. You can find at least 1 copy here: http://www.colophonbookarts.com/video.html (Worth the price)

              Iris Nevins: Traditional Marbling available here - http://www.marblingpaper.com/marbling3.html. (A gem)

              Iris is very helpful on this forum and very generous with information

              Marbling is fun enjoy yourself.
              M

              --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "BillyC" <bill@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello,
              Is the Peggy Skycroft video that Dharma sells good? Has anyone seen it?
              > Thanks for any help. It is useful and educational just reading through the archives.
              > Bill Colvard
              > bill@...
              > www.CoutureDesignGroup.com
              >
            • Sue Cole
              Peggy Skycraft add powdered pigments to some of her paints to give them more punch and I believe she talks about it on the video. Sue
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 23, 2009
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                Peggy Skycraft add powdered pigments to some of her paints to
                give them more "punch" and I believe she talks about it on the
                video.
                Sue
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