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Re: [Marbling] marbling with ceramcoat paints?

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  • irisnevins
    Hi.... I love Ceramcoat, but you really need to test a basic red, yellow, blue, black and white if you want it. Mix other colors from these for less variables
    Message 1 of 2 , May 19, 2009
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      Hi.... I love Ceramcoat, but you really need to test a basic red, yellow, blue, black and white if you want it. Mix other colors from these for less variables in the problems. Like any commercial paint some colors work better than others, others not at all, and to make you even crazier, the ingredients from batch to batch of the same color can change a bit from time to time. Add the weather and whatever else to that and you could easily go mad!

      Water... well I was never told I couldn't use the hard water where I live, being self taught, I just adapted fine to it. If marbling wood I wouldn't thin it down unless it was very gooey. I haven't used it for a good while so can't report on the state of all the colors and how they act in Ceramcoat, but overall it was a very nice and cooperative paint. If you have problems I would then try distilled water as a test to rule out if the water was causing trouble. I don't think it will. The only difference I find with the hard water is that you may need a tad more carrageenan (I assume you are using that?) than with soft to reach the same viscosity.
      Iris Nevins
      www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Doug & Carol Hunt<mailto:douglas_hunt@...>
      To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2009 1:42 PM
      Subject: [Marbling] marbling with ceramcoat paints?


      I joined months ago and have not had much opportunity to follow posts or participate. I am a novice at marbling. I am building a solid-body electric guitar and want to dip the body.

      As the guitar will have gold hardware, I thought muted yellows (not bright sun yellow or school bus yellow) and golds even light sand colors would look good, maybe a little streak of charcoal gray or a little swirl of red mixed in to keep it interesting.

      I have several practice guitar bodies I've made along the journey, that I plan to seal, and plug holes with beeswax, and dip for practice once I commit to mixing up a giant batch of carrageenan.

      Any hints or tips for success? Does the purity of the water make a difference in the quality of the outcome? Water is pretty hard around here in the midwest, left untreated it turns chromed brass fixtures to green, and leaves brown rust stains on porcelain in short order. Should the ceramcoat paint be thinned? I understand different colors behave a bit differently...any hints on using yellows primarily?

      Thanks in advance,

      Doug




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