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New to this Group, and Marbling, but not to Handcrafts

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  • Jim Kimpell
    Hello Marblers , My name is Jim Kimpell and I find the art of Marbling fascinating. I have many 18th century books with marbled edges and frontice pieces. I am
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 28, 2009
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      Hello Marblers , My name is Jim Kimpell and I find the art of
      Marbling fascinating. I have many 18th century books with marbled
      edges and frontice pieces. I am a historical Tinsmith & reenactor of
      the Great Lakes Fur Trade era, and also do early French, and Canadian
      interpretations. We recently bought an acreage with a huge barn in
      the heartland of farm country in Iowa, and I am getting my shop set
      up in the loft. I just found out last week that my job of 10 years
      was permanently eliminated, only 2 weeks after we bought the
      acreage,so , with no jobs available in this area, I have decided to
      have a try at working for myself, and raising Heirloom vegatables,
      Dominique chickens, and uor 5 dogs(rescue animals0 and our miniature
      goats.
      I have no marbling equipment yet, and I am hoping to find someone
      that has not used their equipment for awhile that would be willing to
      part with everything and maybe get a good bulk deal. I don't want
      this to sound like begging, but I haven't got alot of extra cash on
      hand at the moment, due to current economy.
      So if anyone knows of equipment, books, materials that can be had,
      please let me know. I make very nice leather covered small trunks and
      a large variety of historical tinware if anyone wants to trade !
      I look forward to learning and sharing much with this group.
    • Norm LeBret
      Hi Jim, Boy, do I understand the downside of having a cush-job that was supposed to be the career leading to retirement! Sorry to learn that happened to you.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 28, 2009
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        Hi Jim,

        Boy, do I understand the downside of having a cush-job that was supposed to be the career leading to retirement! Sorry to learn that happened to you. I was skeptical about the security of working for a big company, way back in the early '70s when Jimmy Ling's empire collapsed and my brother found himself without a job. Since then, I've always looked to self-employment as being the only real security in life. I wish you the best of luck!

        I stumbled onto "marbling" not too long ago, when I saw some work that looked very much like paintings I've been doing for several years. My technique differs because I only use oil paints and a shallow pan filled with water. My interests lay in the physical interaction between pigments, carriers, and substrates. The variation I get with my simple setup is enough to keep me intrigued for a long time. All you have to do is stea... um, borrow one of your wife's shallow cookie pans or something like that.
        Norm

        p.s. you can see examples on my page at Art Scuttlebutt http://www.artscuttlebutt.com/nononorm




        ________________________________
        From: Jim Kimpell <Highhorse@...>
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 10:15:10 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] New to this Group, and Marbling, but not to Handcrafts


        Hello Marblers , My name is Jim Kimpell and I find the art of
        Marbling fascinating. I have many 18th century books with marbled
        edges and frontice pieces. I am a historical Tinsmith & reenactor of
        the Great Lakes Fur Trade era, and also do early French, and Canadian
        interpretations. We recently bought an acreage with a huge barn in
        the heartland of farm country in Iowa, and I am getting my shop set
        up in the loft. I just found out last week that my job of 10 years
        was permanently eliminated, only 2 weeks after we bought the
        acreage,so , with no jobs available in this area, I have decided to
        have a try at working for myself, and raising Heirloom vegatables,
        Dominique chickens, and uor 5 dogs(rescue animals0 and our miniature
        goats.
        I have no marbling equipment yet, and I am hoping to find someone
        that has not used their equipment for awhile that would be willing to
        part with everything and maybe get a good bulk deal. I don't want
        this to sound like begging, but I haven't got alot of extra cash on
        hand at the moment, due to current economy.
        So if anyone knows of equipment, books, materials that can be had,
        please let me know. I make very nice leather covered small trunks and
        a large variety of historical tinware if anyone wants to trade !
        I look forward to learning and sharing much with this group.




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • keith223882
        Hello Jim, Just read your message and I wish you all the luck, sounds like you ve got a great project there in Iowa. Sorry I can t help with any equipment as
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 28, 2009
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          Hello Jim, Just read your message and I wish you all the luck, sounds
          like you've got a great project there in Iowa. Sorry I can't help
          with any equipment as mine is in use 24/7. I am a book-restorer and
          became interested in marbling about 30 years ago and now it's taken
          over my business and I can't produce enough! I do hope you've got the
          market for it out there in the US. I know there's a lot of commercial
          marblers over there. Here in the 'ole UK (North Wales to be precise)
          there's about 18 full-timers and a great many more bookbinders so the
          ratio to keep marblers busy is about right. A lot of my paper goes to
          make lampshades. Bye for now and good luck.

          Regards, Keith Houghton

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Kimpell" <Highhorse@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Marblers , My name is Jim Kimpell and I find the art of
          > Marbling fascinating. I have many 18th century books with marbled
          > edges and frontice pieces. I am a historical Tinsmith & reenactor
          of
          > the Great Lakes Fur Trade era, and also do early French, and
          Canadian
          > interpretations. We recently bought an acreage with a huge barn in
          > the heartland of farm country in Iowa, and I am getting my shop set
          > up in the loft. I just found out last week that my job of 10 years
          > was permanently eliminated, only 2 weeks after we bought the
          > acreage,so , with no jobs available in this area, I have decided to
          > have a try at working for myself, and raising Heirloom vegatables,
          > Dominique chickens, and uor 5 dogs(rescue animals0 and our
          miniature
          > goats.
          > I have no marbling equipment yet, and I am hoping to find someone
          > that has not used their equipment for awhile that would be willing
          to
          > part with everything and maybe get a good bulk deal. I don't want
          > this to sound like begging, but I haven't got alot of extra cash on
          > hand at the moment, due to current economy.
          > So if anyone knows of equipment, books, materials that can be had,
          > please let me know. I make very nice leather covered small trunks
          and
          > a large variety of historical tinware if anyone wants to trade !
          > I look forward to learning and sharing much with this group.
          >
        • Sue Cole
          Content-type: Multipart/Alternative; boundary= Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031 --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031 I built most of my trays from old pieces of
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 29, 2009
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            Content-type: Multipart/Alternative; boundary="Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031"

            --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031
            I built most of my trays from old pieces of paneling that I salvaged that someone had
            thrown out for the bottoms and lathe or 1 x 2's for the sides. Then I lined them with a
            double layer of 6 miil visqueen (clear plastic). I also use clear plastic box frames for
            photos from Michaels Crafts Store, which are perfect. They are in sizes from 5 x 7 to
            16 x 20 and are relatively cheap. I've also used thrown out cookie sheet - jelly roll
            pans if they are not rusted.

            Instead of lining things with plastic, you can also seal all the edges with aquarium
            sealant, then spray paint them white with Krylon or something. I made my own tools
            from corrugated plastic like they use for making signs, then putting pins in them and
            duct taping them.

            This article from Wet Canvas is very good and shows the tools:
            http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/index.php
            I've printed out a lot of things and have them in a notebook to refer to.

            Otherwise, you can buy starter kits of tools for not too much from either
            www.volcanoarts.biz or from Galen Berry at http://marbleart.us/ I also learned a lot
            by myself from looking up marbling on Google and watching videos on youtube, like
            this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54OILOfT1bs&eurl=http://www.f by
            these two marvelous ladies from Australia.

            I've bought almost every book that exists on marbling and 2 dvd's. I've only been
            able to take one lesson from a "real" marbler and have had to learn the rest by
            myself because almost no one here does it. I've become somewhat obssessed by it
            and now make papers and marbled silk scarves.

            Hope this helps,
            Sue

            --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031
            <body>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">I built most of my trays from old
            pieces of paneling that I salvaged that someone had
            thrown out for the bottoms and lathe or 1 x 2's for the sides.  Then I lined them with a
            double layer of 6 miil visqueen (clear plastic).  I also use clear plastic box frames for
            photos from Michaels Crafts Store, which are perfect. They are in sizes from 5 x 7 to
            16 x 20 and are relatively cheap.   I've also used thrown out cookie sheet - jelly roll
            pans if they are not rusted.  </span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><br>
            </div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">Instead of lining things with plastic,
            you can also seal all the edges with aquarium
            sealant, then spray paint them white with Krylon or something.  I made my own tools
            from corrugated plastic like they use for making signs, then putting pins in them and
            duct taping them.  </span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><br>
            </div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">This article from Wet Canvas is very
            good and shows the tools:</span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><a href="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/index.php"><font face="Times New Roman" size=3><span
            style="font-size:12pt"><u>http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/index.php</u></span></font></a><font
            face="Times New Roman" size=3>
             </font></div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Times New Roman" size=3><span style="font-size:12pt">I've printed out
            a lot of things and have them in a notebook to refer to.</span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><br>
            </div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">Otherwise, you can buy starter kits
            of tools for not too much from either
            www.volcanoarts.biz  or from Galen Berry at http://marbleart.us/  I also learned a lot
            by myself from looking up marbling on Google and watching  videos on youtube, like
            this one:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54OILOfT1bs&eurl=http://www.f  by
            these two marvelous ladies from Australia.</span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><br>
            </div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">I've bought almost every book that
            exists on marbling and 2 dvd's.  I've only been
            able to take one lesson from a "real" marbler and have had to learn the rest by
            myself because almost no one here does it.  I've become somewhat obssessed by it
            and now make papers and marbled silk scarves.</span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><br>
            </div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">Hope this helps,</span></font></div>
            <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">Sue</span></font></div>
            </body>

            --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031--
          • Jim Kimpell
            Thank you for the replies and starting points. I am going to order some basics and paper to get my feet wet, and hopefully not covered with paint ! I think I
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 30, 2009
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              Thank you for the replies and starting points. I am going to order
              some basics and paper to get my feet wet, and hopefully not covered
              with paint !
              I think I will build my own tray and I found a set of five combs for
              sale, so I should be trying a bit soon.
              Jim











              --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, Sue Cole <akartisan@...> wrote:
              >
              > Content-type: Multipart/Alternative; boundary="Alt-Boundary-
              31781.401918031"
              >
              > --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031
              > I built most of my trays from old pieces of paneling that I
              salvaged that someone had
              > thrown out for the bottoms and lathe or 1 x 2's for the sides.
              Then I lined them with a
              > double layer of 6 miil visqueen (clear plastic). I also use clear
              plastic box frames for
              > photos from Michaels Crafts Store, which are perfect. They are in
              sizes from 5 x 7 to
              > 16 x 20 and are relatively cheap. I've also used thrown out
              cookie sheet - jelly roll
              > pans if they are not rusted.
              >
              > Instead of lining things with plastic, you can also seal all the
              edges with aquarium
              > sealant, then spray paint them white with Krylon or something. I
              made my own tools
              > from corrugated plastic like they use for making signs, then
              putting pins in them and
              > duct taping them.
              >
              > This article from Wet Canvas is very good and shows the tools:
              > http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/index.php
              > I've printed out a lot of things and have them in a notebook to
              refer to.
              >
              > Otherwise, you can buy starter kits of tools for not too much from
              either
              > www.volcanoarts.biz or from Galen Berry at http://marbleart.us/ I
              also learned a lot
              > by myself from looking up marbling on Google and watching videos
              on youtube, like
              > this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?
              v=54OILOfT1bs&eurl=http://www.f by
              > these two marvelous ladies from Australia.
              >
              > I've bought almost every book that exists on marbling and 2 dvd's.
              I've only been
              > able to take one lesson from a "real" marbler and have had to learn
              the rest by
              > myself because almost no one here does it. I've become somewhat
              obssessed by it
              > and now make papers and marbled silk scarves.
              >
              > Hope this helps,
              > Sue
              >
              > --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031
              > <body>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">I
              built most of my trays from old
              > pieces of paneling that I salvaged that someone had
              > thrown out for the bottoms and lathe or 1 x 2's for the sides.
               Then I lined them with a
              > double layer of 6 miil visqueen (clear plastic).  I also use
              clear plastic box frames for
              > photos from Michaels Crafts Store, which are perfect. They are in
              sizes from 5 x 7 to
              > 16 x 20 and are relatively cheap.   I've also used thrown
              out cookie sheet - jelly roll
              > pans if they are not rusted.  </span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><br>
              > </div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-
              size:10pt">Instead of lining things with plastic,
              > you can also seal all the edges with aquarium
              > sealant, then spray paint them white with Krylon or something.
               I made my own tools
              > from corrugated plastic like they use for making signs, then
              putting pins in them and
              > duct taping them.  </span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><br>
              > </div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-
              size:10pt">This article from Wet Canvas is very
              > good and shows the tools:</span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><a
              href="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/index.php"><font
              face="Times New Roman" size=3><span
              > style="font-
              size:12pt"><u>http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/index.php</u
              ></span></font></a><font
              > face="Times New Roman" size=3>
              >  </font></div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Times New Roman" size=3><span
              style="font-size:12pt">I've printed out
              > a lot of things and have them in a notebook to refer
              to.</span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><br>
              > </div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-
              size:10pt">Otherwise, you can buy starter kits
              > of tools for not too much from either
              > www.volcanoarts.biz  or from Galen Berry at
              http://marbleart.us/  I also learned a lot
              > by myself from looking up marbling on Google and watching
               videos on youtube, like
              > this one:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?
              v=54OILOfT1bs&eurl=http://www.f  by
              > these two marvelous ladies from Australia.</span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><br>
              > </div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-
              size:10pt">I've bought almost every book that
              > exists on marbling and 2 dvd's.  I've only been
              > able to take one lesson from a "real" marbler and have
              had to learn the rest by
              > myself because almost no one here does it.  I've become
              somewhat obssessed by it
              > and now make papers and marbled silk scarves.</span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><br>
              > </div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-
              size:10pt">Hope this helps,</span></font></div>
              > <div align="left"><font face="Arial"><span style="font-
              size:10pt">Sue</span></font></div>
              > </body>
              >
              > --Alt-Boundary-31781.401918031--
              >
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