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Agate papers

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  • Erik Haagensen
    I belive that what is called agate papers in Scandinavia is a kind of decorative papers that was made by a process that was more convenient to automate to
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 30, 2008
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      I belive that what is called "agate papers" in Scandinavia is a kind of
      decorative papers that was made by a process that was more convenient
      to automate to make it cheaper than the hand made marbled papers.

      These kind of papers have many names across languages - some is
      discussed in this message:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/message/4436

      I have uploaded some examples in this album:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/photos/album/1593690060/pic/list


      Does anyone know details that could describe the process of making
      these papers ???
    • Erik Haagensen
      Susanne Krause is not able to post replies to the group - so I promised her to post her answer to my message. ... Hi Erik, Yahoo says they cannot accept my
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 2, 2008
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        Susanne Krause is not able to post replies to the group - so I promised
        her to post her answer to my message.

        Here it is:
        ----------------------

        Hi Erik,


        Yahoo says they cannot accept my posting, why I do not know, but I
        thought you'd like an answer to your question nevertheless:


        Agate papers are a sub group of Sprinkled Papers. They are/were indeed
        made predominantly in an industrial or semi-industrial process. The
        technique is no secret: a sheet is brushed in the basic colour and
        immediately afterwards sprinkled, i.e. while the first colour is still
        wet; this accounts for the soft fringes around every sprinkle.


        To make full format sheets in predictable quality is quite another
        thing, though. The 'open' time is very short as all the sprinkles must
        land in the wet basic colour at more or less the same time.
        Predictably, the work has to be done at lightning speed. You need also
        to find the right tools, colourants and additives to make sure that all
        the sprinkles are of more or less the same size and form, dry quickly
        while keeping their shape and spread evenly. The room's climate has to
        be just so. The usually glazed surface was usually achieved in a
        mechanical process.


        So you see it's the perfect thing for (19th century) industrial
        production: quick, cheap, glossy. They are still produced and still on
        big sheets (70x100) of deplorable quality and still glossy and still
        abominably cheap at EUR 2,11 netto per sheet (as in the current
        catalogue of one of the big German bookbindind suppliers).
        For comparison: I'm hand making something like agate papers for
        restoration, meaning on certified base paper with pH neutral colourants
        and a protective brushing on top. Being no machine but a human paper
        decorator, to achieve the desired effects I have to go the long way and
        put the sheets to dry three times between steps. I'm selling at EUR
        9,40 netto per sheet in 50x70, and it is definitely not the sort I'm
        having the best gain with.


        As to nomenclature. Agate papers is the correct term. But as each
        producer wants their customers to come back they invented the most
        colourful trade names, so don't let yourself be deceived by another
        term for the same paper!


        Kind regards,


        Susanne

        ........................................................................
        ...........................
        Susanne Krause
        HAMBURGER BUNTPAPIER
        und
        BUNTPAPIERVERLAG

        Wittenbergener Weg 32
        22559 Hamburg
        Deutschland
        Telefon 0049-40-81 77 06
        Mail: studio@...
        http://www.hamburgerbuntpapier.de
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