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marbling solid electric guitar bodies

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  • Doug & Carol Hunt
    I m new to the group and marbling. I haven t marbled anything in a long time, and as I recall, a school teacher used thinned water colors floated on paint
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 15, 2008
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      I'm new to the group and marbling. I haven't marbled anything in a
      long time, and as I recall, a school teacher used thinned water colors
      floated on paint thinner/mineral spirits...it had that distinctive odor.

      Anyway, I'm interested in marbling a solid electric guitar body. I've
      seen a couple videos on-line with thickened water in a trash can, and
      the primed/alum-ed body slowly dipped in.

      I don't know what questions to ask at this point. I haven't got any
      bodies prepped to the point of being ready to dip. I have read that
      screw holes should be filled with wax so water doesn't enter and swell
      the wood surrounding the hole.

      I guess I am curious to know, if I use Ceramcoat paint 1) do the
      colors behave differently in the size, or pretty much the same, if
      differently, what should I be on the look-out for? 2) will solid,
      opaque color also be raised on the surface, or in other words, can I
      get opaque color without the color being raised up on the surface?

      Thanks,

      Doug Hunt
    • irisnevins
      I am a big fan of Ceram Coat but not all the colors work well for marbling. I have only used them on Carrageenan size. I don t use them often, but best to find
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 15, 2008
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        I am a big fan of Ceram Coat but not all the colors work well for marbling. I have only used them on Carrageenan size. I don't use them often, but best to find a basic red/yellow/blue/black/white that work and mix from them. I honestly don't remember which exact stock numbers or shades worked, and with commercial paints it's next to meaningless anyway, since they like to tweak the formulas so often.

        I would use carrageenan, and float as much of the paints on the surface, swirl them up, it will be hard to make combed patterns etc. and have them come out well if dipping. then lower the body in but with a back and forth motion that will create a more ripple effect. Keep the moves small, subtle. Test this with scrap wood first.

        You can also use hobby enamels in the same way, on plain water, but act fast, they dry very very quickly. I find those work better if you paint the object with white enamel first, if you want more contrast. No alum needed this way. There is something called Magic Dip that doesn't dry as quickly, it's actually pretty good for this sort of thing. I don't know if it is still made though. I have done a number of wood objects with it, no alum needed either. It's like an enamel but doesn't dry as fast. You could try latex paints for houses too.

        Just try everything. I fear with acrylics, you may not get the bright look you may want on wood... then again maybe you want it subtle. acrylics will need a size bath, enamels, plain water.

        Iris Nevins
        www.marblingpaper.com
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Doug & Carol Hunt<mailto:douglas_hunt@...>
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, October 15, 2008 8:51 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] marbling solid electric guitar bodies


        I'm new to the group and marbling. I haven't marbled anything in a
        long time, and as I recall, a school teacher used thinned water colors
        floated on paint thinner/mineral spirits...it had that distinctive odor.

        Anyway, I'm interested in marbling a solid electric guitar body. I've
        seen a couple videos on-line with thickened water in a trash can, and
        the primed/alum-ed body slowly dipped in.

        I don't know what questions to ask at this point. I haven't got any
        bodies prepped to the point of being ready to dip. I have read that
        screw holes should be filled with wax so water doesn't enter and swell
        the wood surrounding the hole.

        I guess I am curious to know, if I use Ceramcoat paint 1) do the
        colors behave differently in the size, or pretty much the same, if
        differently, what should I be on the look-out for? 2) will solid,
        opaque color also be raised on the surface, or in other words, can I
        get opaque color without the color being raised up on the surface?

        Thanks,

        Doug Hunt



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      • Sue Cole
        I believe what you are remembering is oil paints thinned with mineral spirits then floated on water. They would take better than the acrylics I would think on
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 16, 2008
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          I believe what you are remembering is oil paints thinned with mineral spirits then
          floated on water. They would take better than the acrylics I would think on wood, but
          like Iris said , test different things on some scrap wood first.
          Sue
        • esmalesk
          Doug, Here s a good article on marbling woodturnings that could apply to your guitar bodies. We had one of the people in our turning club demonstrate this
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 17, 2008
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            Doug,
            Here's a good article on marbling woodturnings that could apply to
            your guitar bodies. We had one of the people in our turning club
            demonstrate this method and it turned out well.

            http://www.mceline-artisan.com/article.html

            ED
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