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Francis Bacon's and Johann Beckmann's accounts

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  • Jake Benson
    Greetings everyone, I ve just uploaded a PDF version of Francis Bacon s account of marbling from his Sylva Sylvarum. The images were made available courtesy
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 6, 2008
      Greetings everyone,

      I've just uploaded a PDF version of Francis Bacon's account of marbling
      from his Sylva Sylvarum. The images were made available courtesy of Mr.
      Bruce Bradley, Librarian for the History of Science at the Linda Hall
      Library in Kansas City Missouri. Special thanks to Elinor Eisemann for
      making the request for the images. The file can be downloaded from the
      group web site, in the files section, inside of the Historical Marbling
      Accounts folder.
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/files/Historical%20Marbling%20Ac\
      counts/>

      I have added a text transcription from a later edition in the footnote
      of which I've also provided a link to the account of Johann Beckmann,
      whose Beiträge zur Geschichte der Erfindungen (1780-1805) also gives
      an account. This work was translated into English and can be viewed on
      Googlebooks. Unfortunately, the German version does not seem to be
      available at this time.

      Click here learn more about Bacon.
      <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon>

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon

      and for Beckmann. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Beckmann>

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Beckmann

      Enjoy!

      Jake Benson



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Renato
      Thank you Jake and Elinor for posting that! I just want let you know that Francis Bacon s Sylva Sylvarum images (the whole book) can be viewed with great
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
        Thank you Jake and Elinor for posting that!
        I just want let you know that Francis Bacon's 'Sylva Sylvarum' images
        (the whole book) can be viewed with great resolution at European
        Cultural Heritage Online.

        http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/home

        The texts are quite the same as the ECHO volume of Sylva Sylvarum is
        from 1669 and the one in your post is from 1628.

        Bacon's account of 'Chamoletting of paper' is here:
        http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?
        pn=190&ws=3&mode=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%
        2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpageimg

        If the link doesn't work search for Sylva Sylvarum and go to page 190
        which is the image relate to the book's page 156

        There, you can also find the whole Athanasius Kircher's 'Ars magna
        lucis et umbrae' (1646) including his acccount of 'Chartae Turcico
        more pingendae ratio'.

        Page 814:
        http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?
        pn=939&ws=2&mode=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%
        2Feinstein_exhibition%2Fsources%2F5G6UYVGT%2Fpageimg

        And 815:
        http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?
        url=/mpiwg/online/permanent/einstein_exhibition/sources/5G6UYVGT/pagei
        mg&pn=940&ws=2&mode=imagepath

        If the links turns out bad, you can search for 'Ars magna lucis et
        umbrae' then go to page 939 and 940 which is the image number related
        to page 814 and 815 of the book.

        Unfortunately it is printed in...LATIN! Does anyone have it
        translated?

        All the best,
        Renato Crepaldi

        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Jake Benson" <jemiljan@...> wrote:
        >
        > Greetings everyone,
        >
        > I've just uploaded a PDF version of Francis Bacon's account of
        marbling
        > from his Sylva Sylvarum. The images were made available courtesy
        of Mr.
        > Bruce Bradley, Librarian for the History of Science at the Linda
        Hall
        > Library in Kansas City Missouri. Special thanks to Elinor Eisemann
        for
        > making the request for the images. The file can be downloaded from
        the
        > group web site, in the files section, inside of the Historical
        Marbling
        > Accounts folder.
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/files/Historical%20Marbling%
        20Ac\
        > counts/>
        >
        > I have added a text transcription from a later edition in the
        footnote
        > of which I've also provided a link to the account of Johann
        Beckmann,
        > whose Beiträge zur Geschichte der Erfindungen (1780-1805) also gives
        > an account. This work was translated into English and can be
        viewed on
        > Googlebooks. Unfortunately, the German version does not seem to be
        > available at this time.
        >
        > Click here learn more about Bacon.
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon>
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon
        >
        > and for Beckmann. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Beckmann>
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Beckmann
        >
        > Enjoy!
        >
        > Jake Benson
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Antonio Vélez Celemín
        Thanks to Jake and Elinor to post this links. And to Renato, for the interesting ECHO web. I have a spanish translation of the text by Kircher. With the help
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
          Thanks to Jake and Elinor to post this links.



          And to Renato, for the interesting ECHO web.



          I have a spanish translation of the text by Kircher. With the help of the google engine, I have traslated it into English. I hope that the many errors that this method has, will give a certain "latin charm" to this old text.



          Excuse my audacity.



          Antonio





          The mode to dye the paper in Turkish custom.

          You must immerse tragacanth gum in pure rainwater for three whole days until they formed a white liquid. Then this fluid is filtered and put in a tank of the size of the sheets of paper, but of two or three fingers deep. You must ensure that the fluid used is neither too thick nor too diluted, therefore if it is very dense, colors will not expand properly, and when it is not sufficiently dense the colors will not retain loyalty the figures made.


          As much the colors are lighter, they will be more suitable. The lacquer for red, Indo, as they call the color blue, seem to be the more suitable colors. If you mix some white to the Indo it loses its excessive depth. You can use orpiment for yellow, and white lead for white, albeit they are heavy in nature, if you don't find lighter colors. Colors must be crushed in small quantities on a marble table and must be mixed with water, egg white, bile and oil, which they call petrol, and stored in small pots, not too dry, not too much liquid, but fairly balanced. Efforts should be made to deposit them with a brush in the liquid prepared in advance so that the drops spilled will spread evenly over the surface of the liquid. If this does not happen, you must add a little of bile and mix it until the desired result.

          The colors have to be spilled one by one without a particular order, except that one the experience should teach is the best. When the surface becomes covered completely by the colors, you must stop dump them. In addition, another indication of this is when the colors appear tight with each other, and could be seen with his natural brilliance, nor diluted nor off. However, it is not uncommon for a color that occurs, by its very nature, or by the effect of excess bile that has been mixed with it, to loose its lustre. If the liquid is loaded with too much color, or when the colors sink to the bottom and ruin the liquid, they will not respond well when you'll make drills with a pen or a comb, and they will show less smooth lines and less defined, on what it depends the entire splendor and beauty of this painting.

          Thus, once the colors are discharges and the surface of the liquid is full of color drops like a marble, if what you want is to paint the paper so that represents a marble, then you must introduce gradually in the water a sheet of paper starting by one of its edges until you reach the opposite. Slide slightly across the color, which tends to remain in the area of the ends of the paper, to the sides of the container pressing it with a finger until it would be impregnated in the paper, unrecording anything. Finally, you pick the paper from the edge, which will be removed gradually from the surface of the liquid and will be dried flat. But if what you want is not to paint a marble, but other figures such as tourbillons, feathers, or similar, then sliding again and again, up and down, with a pen, cut all the drops from one side of the container to the opposite , calmly. Once this is done, you will pass a bristle's comb regularly, from the top of the container, to the bottom, to cross transversely the lines of colors that will be cutted perpendicularly and will represent leaves or feathers; finally, with the help of a pen you can make circles or spirals or other irregular lines, as many as you please.

          Moreover, the execution of this work requires an experienced craftsman, because if the colors remain long in the liquid or whether the rest of the colors are left to sink gradually, this will break the liquid. How much the liquid can last only can be ensured with certainty depending on the experience. If it looks ruined by the colors and very muddy, then discard it and make another again, after carefully cleaning the container.

          Anyone observing carefully the manner described will find undoubtedly open the door for other infinite varieties, but I leave these for the investigation of the curious reader.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Renato
          To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, April 07, 2008 8:02 PM
          Subject: [Marbling] Re: Francis Bacon's and Johann Beckmann's accounts


          Thank you Jake and Elinor for posting that!
          I just want let you know that Francis Bacon's 'Sylva Sylvarum' images
          (the whole book) can be viewed with great resolution at European
          Cultural Heritage Online.

          http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/home

          The texts are quite the same as the ECHO volume of Sylva Sylvarum is
          from 1669 and the one in your post is from 1628.

          Bacon's account of 'Chamoletting of paper' is here:
          http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?
          pn=190&ws=3&mode=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%
          2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpageimg

          If the link doesn't work search for Sylva Sylvarum and go to page 190
          which is the image relate to the book's page 156

          There, you can also find the whole Athanasius Kircher's 'Ars magna
          lucis et umbrae' (1646) including his acccount of 'Chartae Turcico
          more pingendae ratio'.

          Page 814:
          http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?
          pn=939&ws=2&mode=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%
          2Feinstein_exhibition%2Fsources%2F5G6UYVGT%2Fpageimg

          And 815:
          http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?
          url=/mpiwg/online/permanent/einstein_exhibition/sources/5G6UYVGT/pagei
          mg&pn=940&ws=2&mode=imagepath

          If the links turns out bad, you can search for 'Ars magna lucis et
          umbrae' then go to page 939 and 940 which is the image number related
          to page 814 and 815 of the book.

          Unfortunately it is printed in...LATIN! Does anyone have it
          translated?

          All the best,
          Renato Crepaldi

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Jake Benson" <jemiljan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Greetings everyone,
          >
          > I've just uploaded a PDF version of Francis Bacon's account of
          marbling
          > from his Sylva Sylvarum. The images were made available courtesy
          of Mr.
          > Bruce Bradley, Librarian for the History of Science at the Linda
          Hall
          > Library in Kansas City Missouri. Special thanks to Elinor Eisemann
          for
          > making the request for the images. The file can be downloaded from
          the
          > group web site, in the files section, inside of the Historical
          Marbling
          > Accounts folder.
          > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/files/Historical%20Marbling%
          20Ac\
          > counts/>
          >
          > I have added a text transcription from a later edition in the
          footnote
          > of which I've also provided a link to the account of Johann
          Beckmann,
          > whose Beiträge zur Geschichte der Erfindungen (1780-1805) also gives
          > an account. This work was translated into English and can be
          viewed on
          > Googlebooks. Unfortunately, the German version does not seem to be
          > available at this time.
          >
          > Click here learn more about Bacon.
          > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon>
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon
          >
          > and for Beckmann. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Beckmann>
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Beckmann
          >
          > Enjoy!
          >
          > Jake Benson
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jake Benson
          Thanks for posting this valuable resource, Renato! Unfortunately your direct links didn;t come through. I find taht for very long links, you must use the
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
            Thanks for posting this valuable resource, Renato!

            Unfortunately your direct links didn;t come through. I find taht for
            very long links, you must use the "Rich Text Editor" message window on
            the group web site. Even if you add angle brakets, the links do not
            alwyas come through intact.

            Here are the direct links again:

            <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?pn=190&ws=3&mo\
            de=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpa\
            geimg>
            <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?pn=190&ws=3&mo\
            de=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpa\
            geimg> Bacon's account of 'Chamoletting of paper'.
            <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?pn=190&ws=3&mo\
            de=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpa\
            geimg>

            Athanasius Kircher's acccount of "Chartae Turcico more pingendae ratio".
            Page 814:
            <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?url=/mpiwg/onl\
            ine/permanent/einstein_exhibition/sources/5G6UYVGT/pageimg&pn=939&ws=2&m\
            ode=imagepath>
            Page 815:
            <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?url=/mpiwg/onl\
            ine/permanent/einstein_exhibition/sources/5G6UYVGT/pageimg&pn=940&ws=2&m\
            ode=imagepath>

            > Unfortunately it is printed in...LATIN! Does anyone have it
            > translated?

            Thanks to Antonio for his impromptu translation; however, an English
            translation was published by Charles Adams in 1947:

            Adams, Charles M. "Some notes on the art of marbling paper in the
            seventeenth century." Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 51
            (1947), pp. 411�422.

            Also, Albert Haemmerle translated into German; however, I forget if
            Doizy and Ipert published it in French.

            I have a copy of Adam's article, but it is not scanned and I will not
            have time to get to that until classes are over. Does anyone on this
            list possibly have scanned images or digital copy? I would very much
            like to add that to our group files.

            thanks again,

            Jake





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jake Benson
            Thanks for posting this valuable resource, Renato! Unfortunately your direct links didn;t come through. I find taht for very long links, you must use the
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
              Thanks for posting this valuable resource, Renato!

              Unfortunately your direct links didn;t come through. I find taht for
              very long links, you must use the "Rich Text Editor" message window on
              the group web site. Even if you add angle brakets, the links do not
              alwyas come through intact.

              Here are the direct links again:

              <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?pn=190&ws=3&mo\
              de=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpa\
              geimg>
              <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?pn=190&ws=3&mo\
              de=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpa\
              geimg> Bacon's account of 'Chamoletting of paper'.
              <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?pn=190&ws=3&mo\
              de=imagepath&url=%2Fmpiwg%2Fonline%2Fpermanent%2Flibrary%2FWX8HY2V2%2Fpa\
              geimg>

              Athanasius Kircher's acccount of "Chartae Turcico more pingendae ratio".
              Page 814:
              <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?url=/mpiwg/onl\
              ine/permanent/einstein_exhibition/sources/5G6UYVGT/pageimg&pn=939&ws=2&m\
              ode=imagepath>
              Page 815:
              <http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/ECHOdocuView/ECHOzogiLib?url=/mpiwg/onl\
              ine/permanent/einstein_exhibition/sources/5G6UYVGT/pageimg&pn=940&ws=2&m\
              ode=imagepath>

              > Unfortunately it is printed in...LATIN! Does anyone have it
              > translated?

              Thanks to Antonio for his impromptu translation; however, an English
              translation was published by Charles Adams in 1947:

              Adams, Charles M. "Some notes on the art of marbling paper in the
              seventeenth century." Bulletin of the New York Public Library, 51
              (1947), pp. 411�422.

              Also, Albert Haemmerle translated into German; however, I forget if
              Doizy and Ipert published it in French.

              I have a copy of Adam's article, but it is not scanned and I will not
              have time to get to that until classes are over. Does anyone on this
              list possibly have scanned images or digital copy? I would very much
              like to add that to our group files.

              thanks again,

              Jake





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jake Benson
              Well, so much for Fixed Links ! m not sure how I did it, but I see that I somehow managed to paste the link to Bacon s account three times. Well, at least
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
                Well, so much for "Fixed Links"! 'm not sure how I did it, but I see
                that I somehow managed to paste the link to Bacon's account three
                times. Well, at least they work.

                In any case, the Rich Text Editor does work very well for ensuring
                that long hyperlinks come through intact. I encourage everyone to try
                using it.

                Jake
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